The Best Things To Do in Seattle This Month: February 2024


Jump to: Comedy | Community | Film | Food & Drink | Holidays | Live Music | Performance | Readings & Talks | Visual Art






Remind








List





Vir Das may not be a household name in the States, but the Bollywood star is India’s biggest English-speaking stand-up comedian—the first from the South Asian country to have a Netflix special. In fact, he has four, and was also hailed by Variety as a “Top 10 Comic to Watch.” Get a taste of his charismatic brand of comedy in his lockdown show, Outside In, before heading to the Seattle stop of his brand-new tour. JW
Moore Theatre, Belltown (Fri Feb 2)





Remind








List





“Never has she ever read a newspaper,” but batshit Broad City angel Ilana Glazer will still head to Seattle to spread the good news. (What’s the good news? That she still exists and she’s still hilarious. Try to keep up.) Ilana has been voicing the plucky deuteragonist on Netflix’s Green Eggs and Ham for the last few years, a role that feels somehow perfect for her. I’m hoping she shares the details on her toy collection and love of sandwiches. LC
Moore Theatre, Belltown (Thurs Feb 8)





Remind








List





With shows like Reservation Dogs and writers like Tommy Orange on the rise, Native arts and performances are getting some overdue shine. This evening of laughs spotlights Native comedy greats like Miguel Fierro, Oakland-based stand-up Jackie Keliiaa, Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma member Adrianne Chalepah, and queer trans comic Howie Echo-Hawk—expect a night of stereotype-shirking laughs and thoughts on the land back movement. LC
Neptune Theatre, University District (Mon Feb 19)





Remind








List





With the Better Half Marathon, it’s easier than ever to take the next step (and then the next, and then another one, ad nauseam) in any relationship. Enter in one of four categories: bromance, besties, lovers, and lonely hearts, and choose from 5K, 10K, and half marathon races. If you’re really trying to show someone you can’t do it without them, sign up for the half marathon relay. Entry includes a running hoodie, race photos, and a hot post-race meal (nothing says sexy like sweatily scarfing down oatmeal together). My sister, a runner who completed her first half marathon last year, tells me My Better Half is supposed to be a “great race” because the course is “along the water and downhill, and also the medal is cute.” SL
Seward Park, Seward Park (Sun Feb 11)





Remind








List





Love is in the air—or is that plant fragrance? If topiaries tickle your fancy and flowers float your boat (so to speak), head on over to a weekend full of blooming displays at the Northwest Flower & Garden Festival. You can check out over 20 display gardens built around the theme “I Heart Spring,” and browse the marketplace for a new plant baby (or a dozen) to take home. With over 90 seminars and talks from gardening specialists, I’m hoping to finally learn how not to kill every living thing I bring into my place. SL
Seattle Convention Center, Downtown (Feb 14–18)





Remind








List





It doesn’t matter if you’re a gamer, sci-fi nerd, anime fan, fantasy fairy, or cosplay artist, Emerald City Comic Con is for you! Don’t miss this jam-packed weekend of panels, meet-and-greets, cosplay, comics, fanfic, and screenings. This welcoming con offers youngling lightsaber training, furry meetups, and panels on topics like mental health in pop culture and LGBTQ+ representation in the superhero world. Celebrity guests include America’s favorite ass (Chris Evans), James Hong of EEAAO and Kung Fu Panda fame, the first female (and 13th overall) Doctor Jodie Whittaker, LOTR buds Elijah Wood and Sean Astin, and many more. Good news for Twilight fans (Washington pride!), four of the actors who played members of the Cullen family will make appearances. SL
Seattle Convention Center, Downtown (Feb 29–Mar 3)





Remind








List





Kick off Black History Month in the grooviest way possible with the Afrofuturist masterpiece Space Is The Place, which sees space prophet Sun Ra and the whole Intergalactic Solar Arkestra return to Earth (Oakland, to be exact) after a cosmic trip to prep Black people for an impending apocalypse through teleportation tunes. Their music aims to transport listeners to a “planetary paradise away from violence and racial prejudices”—if you haven’t seen the sci-fi classic yet, make this the year you fix that. LC
Central Cinema, Central District (Feb 2–7)





Remind








List





Relive your lunchbox-toting years at this annual hybrid festival, which promises a “cine-magical extravaganza for tots, teens, and everyone in between.” Sound corny? WHO CARES?? CFFS has presented an annual lineup of children’s flicks for 19 years and has grown to become the largest film festival on the West Coast dedicated to kids and their families. Get into it—you’re basically guaranteed to see something sweet and life-affirming. This year’s slate includes a youth-juried roundup of over 150 films by international artists, plus affordable “field trips” for educators and their students, cosmic-themed workshops, and more. LC
Northwest Film Forum, Capitol Hill (Feb 2–10)





Remind








List





Life is short. Spend 10 hours of it watching Peter Jackson’s entire Lord of the Rings trilogy, then spend another 10 hours watching his entire Hobbit trilogy. (Don’t say I never gave you any good life advice.) As someone who just read The Hobbit for the first time over Christmas, I’m rather enraptured by J.R.R. Tolkien’s world of talking bears and breakfast-loving little guys like Bilbo, and Middle-earth seems as good a place as any to defrost from a long winter. On February 3, the newly minted SIFF Cinema Downtown will screen the entire LOTR trilogy for diehard Ringers, but you can also catch individual screenings February 2-15. LC
SIFF Cinema Downtown, Belltown (Feb 2–15)





Remind








List





Originating in 2018 as a partnership between the National Nordic Museum and the cultural association Pacific Sámi Searvi, the Sámi Film Festival has blossomed into a hybrid event with extensive in-person and virtual film programming from Sámi (indigenous Northern Scandinavian) cultures. This year’s festival explores the work of “newly released and classic Sámi features, documentaries, and short films” selected by guest curator Liselotte Wajstedt, including an in-person screening of Katja Gauriloff’s Je’vida, the first film in the Skolt Sámi language. LC
National Nordic Museum, Ballard (Feb 8–11)





Remind








List





Dan Savage’s pioneering erotic film fest will premiere an all-new lineup of sexy films featuring all genders and orientations at On the Boards this year. Since 2005, HUMP! has brought inclusive, creative, and kinky films to the big screen—scope out the sex-positive fest in person for a tantalizing treat. This year’s fest features not one but two feature-length lineups—part one includes a feast of “24 brand-spanking-new films” for your eyeballs. It’s worth a venture outside of your sex dungeon, but you can still wear the latex catsuit. LC
On the Boards, Uptown (Feb 8–Mar 2)





Remind








List





For the 18th edition of Port Townsend’s proudly quirky two-day festival, over 20 brewers will flaunt the most esoteric and offbeat beers they have to offer. (Last year’s “Strangest Brew” winner was Double Bluff Brewing’s French Onion Soup beer, made with puréed caramelized onions, to give you an idea of what’s in store.) A steady lineup of local music and food vendors will keep energy levels high, and local glass blower Patrick Forrestal of Port Townsend Glassworks will show off his talents with a live demonstration. JB
American Legion Hall, Port Townsend (Feb 2–3)





Remind








List





Too many Valentine’s Day menus are overwrought and fussy, leaning too heavily on cloying clichés. Not so with L’Oursin’s three-course prix-fixe meal—the charming French bistro presents bright, refreshing, romantic options like a blush-pink chicory and chèvre salad, dry-aged salmon crudo, seared scallops with tarragon velouté, ravioli featuring the appealingly named “winter luxury squash,” passionfruit tarts, and chocolate crèmeux, as well as optional supplements (like foie gras and oysters) and wine pairings. JB
L’Oursin, Central District (Wed Feb 14)





Remind








List





The first of Seattle Center’s 2024 cultural festivals celebrates Tết, or Vietnamese Lunar New Year. A fashion show will feature colorful ao dai, traditional Vietnamese dresses, and the rest of the schedule is jam-packed with art, music, performances, and hands-on experiences that showcase Vietnamese culture. Expect red and yellow everywhere (they’re considered lucky colors) and get excited for lion dances and Vietnamese food from vendors like CÀPHÊTERIA and Cỏ May Bistro. There will also be a health fair providing free services, screenings, and support. SL 
Seattle Center, Uptown (Feb 3–4)

Madame Mars’ Mystic Society: A Mardi Gras Spectacular



Remind








List





Let them eat king cake! Emerald City Trapeze will channel some Mardi Gras spirit with this blend of magic-conjuring cabaret, flying trapeze, circus, and drag performances, all set to live music within the portal of Madame Mars’s pink-lit, “magnificent parlor.” Show some extra love for the Bayou State by heading to the 21+ show on February 10, which will laissez les bons temps rouler with a moonlit after-party beneath the big top. LC
Emerald City Trapeze Arts, SoDo (Feb 9–10)





Remind








List





Seattle’s largest indoor Night Market celebrates Lunar New Year for the fourth year in a row with an adults-only evening of entertainment, delicious eats, and a makers market. Don’t miss the drunken lion dance or DJs and dance performances from K-POP Seattle, and be sure to explore wares and treats from dozens of AAPI-owned businesses. On our list: slurping hot noods from Oh Dang while browsing delightfully cute creations from Peachy x Noodle. There’s even a bar dedicated to two of Seattle’s favorite things: alcohol and boba—a dream come true! General admission tickets are just $15, but for ten bucks more you can treat yourself to “All Day Happy Hour,” which includes a tote bag, access to the express bar, and two drink tickets. SL
Magnuson Park Hangar 30, Sand Point (Sat Feb 10)





Remind








List





Every year, the Northwest African American Museum hosts a Smithsonian scholar for Black History Month. Don’t miss 2024’s keynote from Dr. Doretha Williams and her family history team on Black ancestry and genealogy. NAAM is always worth a visit, as they showcase African American art, history, and culture in the PNW year-round, including with current exhibitions Positive Frequencies and Oregon Black Pioneers. SL
Northwest African American Museum, Central District (Thurs Feb 15)





Remind








List





There are so many music festivals in the PNW these days, but there’s always been a noticeable lack of soul, funk, and R&B fests. Olympia’s new Funk OFF! festival is looking to fill that gap with three days of live music, dancing, food trucks, and other “merrymaking activities.” Highlights from the lineup, which covers both homegrown and touring talent, include pioneering soul artists George Porter Jr. (of the Meters), New Orleans funk ensemble the Rumble (ft. Chief Joseph Boudreaux Jr.), soulful singer-songwriter Ron Artis II & the Truth, and the Seattle-based prog-funk band Polyrhythmics. AV
Capitol Theater, Olympia (Feb 2–4)





Remind








List





The post-holiday winter months can feel a bit bleak—it’s cold and dark with no twinkling lights to illuminate your neighborhood. That’s why I love a late winter festival—it helps that special December magic live on while forcing you out of hibernation. At Seattle Chamber Music Society’s annual six-day winter program, they will celebrate the fertile musical history of the British Isles with two weekends of music from Britain’s greatest composers of the early 20th century along with works by Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, and other great masters. AV
(Benaroya Hall, Downtown (Feb 2–4)





Remind








List





We all have that one song that transports us to a very specific place and time. For me, it’s the Cold War Kids’ “Hang Me Up To Dry.” The first strum of the distorted guitar pulls me straight back to autumn of 2009, walking around in the rain at the Seattle Center’s Fun Forest (RIP) with my best friend while sipping soy milk lattes and talking shit about our middle school teachers. “Hang Me Up To Dry” is angsty, sweaty, and cacophonous—it’s the mother of all indie sleaze songs. I shrieked when I heard it on the soundtrack of Emerald Fennell’s Y2K period flick Saltburn. The West Coast indie rockers will ride the wave of nostalgia back to Seattle in honor of their 20th bandiversary. Indie pop duo Hovvdy will open. AV
Moore Theatre, Belltown (Sat Feb 3)





Remind








List





With the Cold War Kids, Grouplove, Silverun Pickups, and now the Kills touring, it’s shaping up to be a big month for indie sleaze. Throw on any song by the Kills, new or old, and be transported to a grimy underground club circa 2008 with glitter particles floating through the air and American Apparel disco pants abound. The duo will play songs from their first album in six years, God Games, which guitarist Jamie Hince described as “godless spirituals.” AV
Showbox SoDo, SoDo (Wed Feb 7)





Remind








List





My cat Whisper loves the oldies station. Every night, I tune into KIXI (880 AM) and observe his reaction to solid gold classics. Some of his favorites include Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay,” Henry Mancini’s “Moon River,” the Temptations’ “My Girl,” and the Four Tops’ “I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch).” For that reason, I like to imagine an alternate universe where cats are allowed to attend concerts. In that fantasy, Whisper is joined by fellow kitties who share his affinity for Motown. Alas, I may have to attend this concert in his honor. Be grateful that you’re not a feline so that you can witness iconic vocal groups the Temptations and the Four Tops, both of which still have at least one founding member several decades into their careers. AV
Paramount Theatre, Downtown (Sat Feb 10)





Remind








List





Most of us know Leslie Feist for her 2007 twee hit “1234,” which was used to market iPod Nanos to the masses back in the day. But, the Canadian singer-songwriter is so much more than that. In my opinion, her best work came in 2019 with Pleasure. The album showed her range with angsty PJ Harvey-esque wails and delicate harmonies—to this day, it’s my favorite album to listen to while taking a bath (if you’re a bath person, then you know that this is high praise). Last year, Feist returned with her sixth album, Multitudes, which leans into avant-folk with plucked guitars and ethereal layered vocals. Yet another immaculate bath-time record—props to her! AV
Showbox SoDo, SoDo (Fri Feb 16)





Remind








List





In 2022, Jon Batiste won the coveted Grammy for Album of the Year, beating out pop radio heavies like Taylor Swift, Olivia Rodrigo, Lil Nas X, Billie Eilish, and Doja Cat—and for good reason! On his award-winning album WE ARE, Batiste is credited for playing over two dozen instruments along with self-producing, writing, arranging, and composing. He will support his newest output, World Music Radio, which is more radio-ready than ever with pop hooks, hip-hop beats, and A-list features like Lana Del Rey, Lil Wayne, and Seattle’s own Kenny G. AV
Paramount Theatre, Downtown (Sat Feb 17)





Remind








List





With Ticketmaster charging exorbitant prices for big-name concerts, I prayed to the pop gods not to announce any tours that would entice me. So of course, the Queen of Pop herself had to go and announce her Celebration tour. Described in the press release as a career-spanning “one-of-a-kind experience” that pays respects to her career’s birthplace of New York City, Madonna has vowed to give fans “the show they have been waiting for.” Plus, RuPaul’s Drag Race royalty Bob the Drag Queen is opening the show. Goddamnit, I guess I have no choice but to go. I mean what more is there to say? Bitch, it’s Madonna! AV
Climate Pledge Arena, Uptown (Feb 17–18)





Remind








List





Mosh along to Kyoto-based punk quartet Otoboke Beaver’s fast and ferocious anti-love songs from their album Super Champion. The album soars on seething rage and masterful riffs with feminist anthems like “i am not maternal,” “You’re No Hero Shut Up Fuck You Man-Whore,” and “Dirty Old Fart Is Waiting for My Reaction.” They get an A+ for song title creativity. AV
The Crocodile, Belltown (Feb 20–21)





Remind








List





Celebrate the Thin White Duke’s “golden years” with the Seattle Symphony, which will perform a unique interpretation of David Bowie’s emotionally intense final album, Blackstar. The lyrics will be sung by actor/writer/director John Cameron Mitchell, who is best known for creating the cult-classic film and Broadway musical Hedwig and the Angry Inch. If you’ve seen his cover of “Moonage Daydream” in the TV adaptation of Lindy West’s Shrill, then you probably saw this coming. AV
Benaroya Hall, Downtown (Fri Feb 23)





Remind








List





Pop sensation Dorian Electra gained a queer cult following and critical acclaim after the release of their 2019 ’80s-tinged hyperpop debut, Flamboyant. Their newest release, Fanfare, sounds like an absolutely bananas version of Charli XCX’s Vroom Vroom era with elements of metal, hip-hop, and baroque. My favorite lyric on the album? “Fuck it, put it up me like puppet /  Love it, fill me to the brim like bucket / Shove it, Miss Piggy squeal like Muppet” from the track “Puppet.” I’ll let that poetry marinate with you for a moment. Electra will be joined by the electropop duo Frost Children and indie rock project atlgrandma. AV
Neptune Theatre, University District (Fri Feb 23)





Remind








List





Former Portland Mercury contributor Daniela Serna writes: “As Helado Negro, Roberto Carlos Lange creates shimmering and effervescent synth-pop that inhabits the twilight spaces between cultures. Born in South Florida to Ecuadorian parents and currently based in New York, Lange imbues his music with the heat and bright party sounds of Latin America, and often switches between Spanish and English. It’s crafted with musical dexterity—record samples, loops, synths, and a myriad of live instruments are the building blocks of Lange’s electro-psych-pop dreams.” He will return to Seattle with songs from his new album, PHASOR (out February 9). Written and recorded during lockdown, he describes the album as “an homage to going outside again.” AV
Neptune Theatre, University District (Feb 25)





Remind








List





Chances are good that you’re already familiar with this ethereal story of love, agency, and good versus evil. Swan Lake is a must-see for the uninitiated, and a graceful reminder of ballet’s power for die-hard fans. Crafted “by the light of [theatrical set designer] Ming Cho Lee’s luminous moon,” Kent Stowell’s ultra-dreamy adaptation of the wing-flapping masterpiece envelops viewers in the tale of Prince Siegfried and Odette, Queen of the Swans set to Tchaikovsky’s original score. LC
McCaw Hall, Uptown (Feb 2–11)





Remind








List





Back in 2012, Stranger theater critic Brendan Kiley wrote: “Critics talk about hip-hop theater and hip-hop dance-theater, but artists like Abraham are making that critical frame obsolete, demonstrating that hip-hop is an influence, not a cage,” and the sentiment holds true today. Abraham and his dancers will return to the stage with a new dance-based work that’s “galvanized by Black culture and history.” The New York Times recently reported that Abraham is “known for his use of popular music — recently, he has choreographed substantial works to D’Angelo and James Blake,” so expect some tunes you recognize. LC
Moore Theatre, Belltown (Wed Feb 21)





Remind








List





This series of biographical vignettes traces the life of the American Muslim minister and radical Black human rights activist El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, aka Malcolm X, from his early experiences with white supremacy to his conversion to Islam, ground-shaking activist work, and eventual murder. Pulitzer Prize-winning American composer Anthony Davis (Central Park Five) created an intriguing minimalist and jazz-fused score for the operatic work, which is a co-production with Detroit Opera, Opera Omaha, and the Metropolitan Opera. LC
McCaw Hall, Uptown (Feb 24–Mar 9)





Remind








List





I credit the Iranian American Pushcart Prize winner and poet Kaveh Akbar for sparking my initial interest in poetry—his confessional collection Calling a Wolf a Wolf is totally extraordinary, especially if you or someone you love has lived with addiction. Suffice it to say I’m excited about Akbar’s debut novel, excellently titled Martyr!, which tells the story of a martyr-obsessed, “newly sober orphaned son of Iranian immigrants” who meets a terminally ill painter living at the Brooklyn Museum. He’ll discuss the book with Claire Dederer, whose book Monsters: A Fan’s Dilemma expands on the questions she probed in her 2017 Paris Review essay “What Do We Do with the Art of Monstrous Men?LC
Elliott Bay Book Company, Capitol Hill (Thurs Feb 1)





Remind








List





Self-proclaimed “internet yeller” Ijeoma Oluo is also the author of the New York Times bestseller So You Want To Talk About Race and the follow-up book Mediocre: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America, both of which offered critical perspectives on how to navigate the issues of racism and white male supremacy embedded in American culture. But for those wondering “Okay, what now?” Oluo’s latest book might answer your question. Be A Revolution: How Everyday People Are Fighting Oppression and Changing the World — and How You Can, Too looks closely at how folks are enacting change from within the powerful, garbaggio systems that be. Creating seismic shifts for intersectional racial equity is not only possible, it’s necessary, and Oluo’s got thoughts on how you can find an entry point. In this discussion, Oluo will share “how to take conversations on race and racism out of a place of pure pain and trauma, and into a place of loving action.” LC
Town Hall Seattle, First Hill (Fri Feb 9)





Remind








List





Whether you’re prejudiced against parsnips or biased against beets, local cookbook author Becky Selengut is here to help you gently break down your aversions to veggies that have traditionally gotten the short end of the stick. Her newest release Misunderstood Vegetables is dedicated to this mission, with seasonal recipes like charred chard with spicy chili oil and celery root gratin, sure to convert even the pickiest palates. She’ll chat about the plight of unpopular produce with friend, fellow cookbook author, and Spilled Milk co-host Matthew Amster-Burton, followed by a Q&A and book signing. JB
Book Larder, Fremont (Thurs Feb 22)





Remind








List





With ten poetry collections, two memoirs, and several plays and children’s books under her belt (not to mention four albums—yep, she’s also an accomplished saxophonist), three-time Poet Laureate of the United States Joy Harjo (a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation) will head to Seattle after winning Yale’s 2023 Bollingen Prize for American Poetry. She’ll chat with self-described “punk-ass sick neurospicy indigiqueer” Arianne True, an alum of the MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts. LC
Town Hall Seattle, First Hill (Tues Feb 27)





Remind








List





Aiming to redefine stereotypes and notions of luxury in Black culture, the group exhibition Black & Boujee challenges the Eurocentric conception of opulence, centers Afrocentric aesthetics, and will likely expand your perceptions on all things expensive. The show is a great reason to visit Bainbridge Island—it’ll showcase works by Black artists and designers working in painting, sculpture, and other mediums to investigate the “complexity of navigating luxury in a society shaped by racial inequalities.” LC
Bainbridge Island Museum of Art, Winslow (Feb 1–20)





Remind








List





The brilliant, genre-transcending Cuban American artist Ana Mendieta died on September 8, 1985 after somehow “falling” from a window amid an argument with her husband, the minimalist artist Carl Andre, who passed away on January 24. Let’s pay Andre homage the right way: By focusing solely on Mendieta and her “earth-body” works, which stand the test of time and are infinitely stronger than anything he ever created. That’s what Colleen RJC Bratton does in Edgeless Burial, which directly references Mendieta’s Siluetas series of ephemeral body tracings created in varying landscapes. Bratton’s drawings “find their roots in the landscapes that birthed them,” including the Puget Sound, the Cascades, and a small farmstead, among other places. Bratton reckons with impermanence, transformation, and the climate crisis in her multimedia time-lapses and “biomorphic” installation, which also reference Washington’s landmark decision to legalize human composting. LC
Gallery 4Culture, Pioneer Square (Feb 1–29)





Remind








List





If you’re already familiar with the Portland art scene, you’ve likely heard the name “Jessica Jackson Hutchins” float around. Jackson Hutchins’s tactile works transform everyday objects into art forms that are both intimately familiar and reverently heightened, and her ambitious, raw, playful style, which runs the gamut from massive sculptural installations to clothing pieces, is easily recognizable. The artist often employs castoff household objects to create her earth-toned, figurative, and vessel-like forms; in 2016, her process expanded to include collage-like window pieces in fused glass, some of which you’ll see in Jessica Jackson Hutchins: Wrecked and Righteous. The exhibition surveys the last 30-ish years of her career in a nonchronological presentation of furniture pieces, relief paintings, and more, plus “wearable food vessels” that will be activated during a special performance. LC
Frye Art Museum, First Hill (Feb 1–May 5)





Remind








List





Sky Hopinka, a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation, descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño people, and 2022 MacArthur Foundation grant awardee, blends English and “Indigenous dialects such as Chinuk Wawa, a revived Chinookan creole of the Pacific Northwest” in his ground-quaking works, which often layer elements of poetry, prose, and image to think carefully about language as a strong cultural force. I was honored to write about Hopinka’s work back in 2019, so this solo exhibition—the artist’s first in the Pacific Northwest—feels especially exciting. Subterranean Ceremonies includes four recent films and new photographs that “focus on personal and political notions of Indigenous homeland,” inspired by transitory landscapes and Hopinka’s own wanderings. LC
Frye Art Museum, First Hill (Feb 17–May 26)





Remind








List





Conceptual artist and activist Hank Willis Thomas blends mixed media with mass-produced, archival, and contemporary images to create photographs, sculptures, and installations that reckon with important questions about the role of art in civic life. LOVERULES, which pulls works spanning 20 years of Thomas’s career from the Jordan D. Schnitzer Family Foundation’s collection, includes some of his most well-known pieces, including the corporate advertising-inspired works Branded and Unbranded: Reflections in Black by Corporate America. Staying curious about advertising and visual culture as creators of “narratives that shape our notion of value in society,” Thomas spotlights the cultural tropes that influence race relations, inequality, and resistance. LC
Henry Art Gallery, University District (Feb 24–Aug 4)

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *