The Dems Debate: Round One

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts), one of the Democratic presidential candidates, earlier this year. Photo by Gage Skidmore.

Watching the first round of the Democratic Party’s convoluted, unwieldy presidential debate from futuristic Miami on Wednesday, June 26, kept bringing me around to the always sage-like statement that “All politics is local,” attributed most often to the late Democratic Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill (a legendary practitioner of the art and dealings of politics if there ever was one).

The debate was the opening salvo of the 2019-20 presidential election campaign on the Democratic side, not discounting the time when Donald Trump said, “I do solemnly swear,” at his inauguration and every day since then, including his official announcement on June 18, also in Florida, that he was running for reelection.

Round one of the Democratic Party debate, to be followed by another tonight, June 27, was hosted by the folks at NBC, with some of its stellar stars as moderators, inquisitors and, at times, cattle herders.

The spectacle — and it was a spectacle — was illuminating, confusing and entirely a part of the times we live in, in which politics has invaded our daily lives like a broke, insinuating family member who refuses to leave, promises to do the chores and pay rent and does neither.

In that sense, the old adage that politics is local — in the sense that politics occurs not just on Capitol Hill and in other domed places but in town halls, courthouses, shabby offices and taverns (or Starbucks, these days) — seems still true. It has a very democratic, American feel to it, that all governing is important, whether at the school board, municipal, one-cop-town level or in the White House and the halls of Congress.

That adage, in the times we live in and as practiced by the president we have and the elected officials we have elected, has been turned upside down. All politics isn’t local; rather politics and its practice have become a way of life, and a part of our life in ways that seem often ritualistic, pervasive and impossible to avoid and resist, a daily elephant in the room.

That’s why this debate and future ones are emblematic of the body politic, if you will, reflecting how daily life infects and ignites daily politics. Almost every mass shooting or multiple-fatality gun event ignites marches and debates about gun control. Every forest fire, flood, earthquake, hurricane and destructive tornado invites and ignites debates about climate change. The daily outbursts of charges of sexual assaults among the famous and not-so-famous ignite heated debates about gender and identity.

Issues like income disparity, housing availability, rich and poor, taxation, government regulation and its uses, corruption, pay-to-play, gun violence, education, the cost of medicines and health care are lived out in stress and hope, despair and reflection, in our daily lives, and become political issues at campaign rallies. They also became topics at the debate, as opposed to such things as the size of someone’s hands.

President Trump’s major innovation as candidate and president has been his constant and so far unmatched use of Twitter to both great political reward for him, and the rise of divisiveness in the country.

Politics, not for the first time, has become theater, sometimes painful to watch. Locally, we can see it in the mounting and imperiling troubles now faced by Ward 2 Council member Jack Evans, the longest-serving elected member of the District Council. We could see it in the sudden near-implosion of the Virginia state government hierarchy, almost buried in racial issues.

Now that we have reached the opening rounds of the election campaigns, we should look at the first debate as an example of how not to do this event, on the part of the sponsors (NBC, MSNBC and Telemundo) and some of the candidates. The debates have been split into two nights, two levels of candidates, attention to which has been shifted mostly to round two, when Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders (who should really trademark the phrase “free for all”) will face off, perhaps pugnaciously, perhaps not, against each other and another eight candidates.

So far, some 20 candidates — after due tossing and turning and sleepless nights — have decided that, yes, they can, as President Barack Obama did, become president in the interest of mankind.

Most commentators have agreed that Elizabeth Warren, steadfastly and resoundingly progressive and articulate, had the best of it on the first night, although, strangely enough, questioners did not direct much at her during the immigration phase of the night, which was heavily resonant with the hurtful story of an immigrant father and his baby drowning trying to make it across the river.

President Trump, on his way for a meeting to Japan, found time to tweet that the debate was “boring,” right around the time the story of the tragedy was being discussed in the debate. He called the whole affair an unprofessional disaster on the part of NBC, what with a second-half mic glitch making for an embarrassing moment, to say the least.

You could argue that the debate exposed some divisions in the Democratic party: all in, or not, on health care for all, for instance, and how to do that; impeachment or not; how to thwart Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell; the prevention of the loss of Roe v. Wade.

You could also argue that the Democratic Party revealed some of its best and most appealing parts, if you are interested in and believe in diversity, political acumen, articulation, talent and faith in the democratic process. Surely, they fought, and some harder than others, and with sharper knives. But let’s look: three formidable women, including the only candidate with military experience, African Americans and Hispanics, old and youngish, experience and not so much, Americans all.

Family, friends to pay respects to Anthony Dickerson, health care advocate on Space Coast

CLOSE

What happens during a stress test? Courtesy of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System

Friends and family will pay final respects this week to retired Capt. Anthony Dickerson, one of the nation’s first black physician assistants, who was known for his quiet work to help scores of patients  on the Space Coast.

He was 72.

Dickerson, a decorated veteran who served in the Air Force, died June 21 after a lengthy illness.

“He was a gracious guy who provided medical services to individuals who didn’t have health care. He helped people navigate the health-care system,” said Dewitt Scott, a New York City resident, and also a physician assistant.

“There would be times that he’d call us to help buy medicine for senior citizens. He was an advocate.” 

Scott joined with Dickerson and others to form a group of African-American physician assistants called the “Legends.”

The concept of physician assistants, developed at Duke University, was a move to improve health care in the United States in the wake of a shortage of primary care doctors in the 1960s and early ’70s.

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Dickerson was born in Jacksonville and was one of 11 siblings. He finished high school and joined the Air Force, where he continued his love of sports, playing baseball and boxing.

He took up medical training and was a medic during the Vietnam War era and later was promoted to supervising emergency rooms.

He attended the University of Nebraska, where he received a master’s of science degree and became one of the nation’s first black Air Force physician assistants, family members said.

In 1986, Dickerson moved to Melbourne, where he was stationed at Patrick Air Force Base.

He married Barbara J. Gates in 1972, one of the original Freedom Riders who helped draw attention to racial segregation in the South and a longtime community activist in Brevard County.

The two met in the Philippines, with Dickerson following her to Los Angeles. The couple, married 47 years, worked to help others in Brevard.

More: Rajiv Chandra helped establish Brevard’s reputation for cardiology care

Dickerson retired from the Air Force in 1991 and went to work as a partner at a medical practice with the late Dr. Rajiv Chandra, specializing in cardiology and geriatrics. His family life remained important, his son Sean Dickerson said.  

“He loved to watch and attend sporting events, loved good music, to travel, to barbecue … he was known for hosting many people from all walks of life with his famous crab boils. They were all family and friends to him,” son Sean Dickerson said.

Dickerson is survived by his wife and two sons, Sean and Dwayne.

A wake will take place 5 to 7 p.m. Friday at Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church in Palm Bay. A celebration of life with full military honors will take place 11 a.m. Saturday at the church.

Contact Gallop at 321-242-3642, jdgallop@floridatoday.com and Twitter @JDGallop

Read or Share this story: https://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/local/2019/06/27/anthony-dickerson-dead-72-1-1st-african-american-physician-assistants/1584475001/

Crowding at the African American Museum is the result of poor layout more than popularity


In the crowded history galleries of the NMAAHC, you may find yourself reading over the shoulders of other visitors. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
Features reporter

June 27 at 11:15 AM

If you’re among the many who saw the craziness around the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture and thought, “Maybe I’ll wait until the crowds are a little thinner,” I have good news and bad. The good: As the museum approaches its third birthday, it’s not the sardine can it was during its first year. The bad: It’s still insanely crowded, especially during prime hours.

I’m a little surprised the museum still feels so packed. Don’t get me wrong — it’s a fantastic museum, more than worthy of all the buzz. But it’s also a big museum, with 105,000 square feet of exhibit space and 517,198 visitors during the first four months of this year. Compare that with the National Portrait Gallery, which has considerably less exhibit space (57,000 square feet) and more visitors (553,116 in the same four months) — and no timed tickets or long lines.

You might argue (correctly) that portraits tend to be flat, while the NMAAHC displays some enormous, three-dimensional pieces of history, including an entire prison guard tower. (Also, the Portrait Gallery’s interior courtyard probably acts as a pressure valve when crowds get thick.) However, I suspect the layout of the NMAAHC is the biggest culprit in its continuing congestion.

Visits to NMAAHC begin with bottleneck after bottleneck: There’s just one escalator to get to the one glass elevator to get to the beginning of the history exhibit. Then, you’re funneled into a series of narrow rooms that cover the origins of slavery and its transition from being a temporary condition to one that was lifelong and linked to another poisonous construct: race. The bottom floor’s claustrophobic spaces are perhaps meant to echo the nightmarish experience of slave ships, but they also make it tough to take in the thoughtfully presented and succinctly explained history on offer.

The history exhibits become roomier after the timeline reaches the American Revolution — a welcome respite, though it doesn’t make thematic sense. After all, while many white folks probably breathed a sigh of relief when the British retreated, the situation was as bad as ever for most enslaved people. The American Revolution exhibit also represents a rare bit of muddled storytelling in the mostly clear-eyed museum, as it never addresses the obvious question: If the British had won, might slavery have ended sooner in America? Scholars generally hate counterfactuals, but I, for one, would love to hear what NMAAHC historians have to say about this one.

When I visited the NMAAHC a few times during its first year, crowds remained dense all the way through the history levels, and only thinned out around the cultural exhibits — which showcase African Americans’ achievements in music, sports and the visual arts, among other areas. The visual arts part of the museum is particularly nice, with high ceilings and views of the Mall. The art also provides a breath of fresh air. It’s a shame so many people stop short and end up missing showstoppers like BK Adams’ “Blue Horse,” a joyous assemblage of a sculpture, or “Grand Dame Queenie,” a characteristically vivid portrait by Baltimore’s Amy Sherald.

On a recent Friday morning, crowding wasn’t a problem. For the first time, I was able to check out the history displays without having to read over my fellow visitors’ shoulders.

Perhaps that’s how I found a surprising quote from Thomas Jefferson that I had never noticed before: “Nature has given to our black brethren, talents equal to those of the other colors of men, and that the appearance of a want of them is owing merely to the degraded condition.” If Jefferson understood that, how on God’s green earth did he justify slavery? As it turns out, the museum left out the beginning (and the end) of the sentence, which was taken from a letter Jefferson wrote to the black intellectual Benjamin Banneker. “No body wishes more than I do to see such proofs as you exhibit, that …,” the sentence begins (and then ends with “of their existence”). It seems that Jefferson was admitting that Banneker was a smart guy while also implying that he was the exception to the rule. Now that’s the equivocating, flattering Jefferson I know and don’t particularly love.

Despite the crowds, and the occasional truncated quote, the NMAAHC always manages to get across its overarching view of American history as a long slog that ultimately bends toward freedom and equality. This is a hopeful storyline, one that allows us to rejoice in America’s promise even in the face of glaring failures. But as we celebrate the Fourth of July once again, I can’t help but wonder when we will extend the idea of inalienable rights to a huge group of people who have been largely left out of the discussion since Jefferson put quill to parchment: namely, those not lucky enough to have been born here.

More reviews by the Staycationer

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In Case You Missed It: Top Moments From Dem Debate Night 1

They tried to grab the spotlight, offered policies, interrupted each other and mostly steered clear of President Donald Trump (although the biggest applause line was directed right at Trump). The Democratic contest to beat Trump next year ramped up on Wednesday with the first of two debates among the large field of candidates.

Ten candidates took the stage in Miami, and another 10 will Thursday night in match-ups hosted by NBC, MSNBC and Telemundo

The field is large and the 10 Democrats struggled to break out. Here are some of the top moments during the two hours of questions.

REMAKING THE AMERICAN ECONOMY
The first question went to Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and it was on one of her top issues: the economy. With 71 percent of Americans saying the economy is doing well, 60 percent of them Democrats, are the significant changes she calls for risky?

“Who is this economy really working for?” she asked. “It’s doing great for a thinner and thinner slice at the top.”

The economy is doing great for giant drug companies, not for Americans who needed prescriptions filled, for those who want to invest in private prisons, not for African Americans and Latinx whose families are being torn apart, and giant oil companies, not for Americans hurt by climate change, she said.

“When you’ve got a government, when you’ve got an economy, that does great for those with money but isn’t doing great for everybody else. That is corruption pure and simple. We need to call it out, we need to attack it head on and we need to make structural change in our government, in our economy and in our country.”

The economy is the top issue for all Americans regardless of political affiliation, at 33%, according to Emerson College Polling.

Warren was the only candidate in Wednesday’s debate who is polling in the double digits. She has made a name for herself for comprehensive plans that would remake the economy, from eliminating student debt to increasing taxes on corporations and the wealthiest Americans.

Elizabeth Warren: ‘Economy Doing Great for Those With Money’Elizabeth Warren: 'Economy Doing Great for Those With Money'

BILINGUAL CANDIDATES
Former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke was the first, speaking Spanish as he addressed the need for an economy that works for everyone. A short while later, Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey did the same.

“When people come to this country they do not leave their human rights at the border,” he then said in English.

The Hispanic population in the United States stood at 57.5 million in 2016, making it the country’s largest ethnic or racial minority, according to the Census Bureau. Hispanics constituted 17.8 percent of the country.

And in his closing statement, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro — the only Latino candidate in the field — added that he would say, “Adiós to Donald Trump.” Adiós was its own trending item afterward on Twitter. 

Beto O’Rourke Answers Questions in English and SpanishBeto O'Rourke Answers Questions in English and Spanish

AN AFRICAN AMERICAN SON
In such a crowded field, the Democrats need to stand out. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tried one way, interrupting the other candidates a number of times.

And then on the question of guns, he went for another: as the only candidate on the stage raising a black son, with whom he has had to have direct conversations with about police.

De Blasio has raised the topic before, telling New Yorkers about warning his son, Dante, about the dangers he might face in encounters with police. De Blasio’s wife, Chirlane McCray, is African-American.

While many reacted well to his comments, the leaders of the police union took them as a sign of disrespect.

Bill de Blasio Discusses Gun Violence, Mentions Biracial SonBill de Blasio Discusses Gun Violence, Mentions Biracial Son

IRAN’S NUCLEAR THREAT
Booker, of New Jersey, tried another tactic. When all of the candidates were asked to raise their hand if they’d sign the Iran nuclear deal today, Booker was the only one to keep his hands down.

Booker said he supported the deal, which was signed by former President Barack Obama but rejected by Trump, who claimed it would not stop Iran from developing a nuclear bomb. But if he had an opportunity to leverage a better deal, he said, he would take it.

And by keeping his hand down, he ensured he’d get a little more face time during the crowded debate.

TWO TEXANS TALKING OVER EACH OTHER
Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke went head to head in a battle over immigration.

But their differences were small compared to the gulf between the Democrats and Trump. Castro wants crossing into the United States to be decriminalized for everyone while O’Rourke would keep it as a misdemeanor for non-asylum seekers.

HOT MIC INTERRUPTION
An unplanned break came after Chuck Todd asked Warren a question about gun control. Instead of her answer, the audience heard from the previous moderators, Lester Holt and Savannah Guthrie.

“We are hearing our colleague’s audio,” Todd said. “If the control room could turn off the mics.”

The problem persisted.

MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow joked that they had prepared for everything, but “we didn’t prepare for this.”

NBC cut to an extra commercial break while the technical problem was fixed.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT HEALTH INSURANCE
Lester Holt asked the candidates who would abolish their private insurance in favor of a government-run plan.

Only de Blasio and Warren raised their hands and Warren promoted Sen. Bernie Sanders’ Medicare-for-All proposal.

“Yes, I’m with Bernie on Medicare for all,” Warren said. When families in the United States go broke, one of the top reasons is medical costs, she said. And those families often have health care insurance.

“Health care is a basic human right,” she said.

De Blasio jumped in as O’Rourke said he would not abolish private insurance. When O’Rourke said that he thought the choice was fundamental to get everyone insured, de Blasio insisted that private insurance was not working for tens of millions of Americans.

“How can you defend a system that’s not working?” de Blasio asked.

THE COUNTRY’S GREATEST THREAT
What is the biggest threat to the United States?

The answered ranged from China to Iran to Russia to nuclear proliferation to climate change.

But Washington Gov. Jay Inslee’s answer delivered the biggest applause of the night: Donald Trump.

What’s the Biggest Geo-Political Threat to the US? Democratic Candidates AnswerWhat's the Biggest Geo-Political Threat to the US? Democratic Candidates Answer

Highlights from the first night of primary debates

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Story Continued Below

— Candidates battled over immigration and health care during the opening panel of the first Democratic primary debate — with another round coming tonight.

— Saving its most consequential decisions for the final day of its term, the Supreme Court is expected to rule this morning on cases involving partisan gerrymandering and a citizenship question on the census.

— Kentucky state House Minority Leader Rocky Adkins, the conservative Democrat who finished a surprising second in the state’s gubernatorial primary earlier this year, said he’s been asked to run against Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell next year and didn’t rule it out.

Good Thursday morning. Everyone ready for night two? Email me at zmontellaro@politico.com or DM me at @ZachMontellaro.

Email the Campaign Pro team at sshepard@politico.com, dstrauss@politico.com, jarkin@politico.com and lbarron-lopez@politico.com. Follow them on Twitter: @POLITICO_Steve, @DanielStrauss4, @JamesArkin and @lbarronlopez.

POLITICO’s 2020: The Issues is the most comprehensive guide anywhere to the issues shaping the Democratic presidential primary, driven by dozens of expert journalists in the nation’s most robust newsroom covering policy and politics.

Days until the Mississippi gubernatorial primary election: 39

Days until the NC-03 and NC-09 general elections: 75

Days until the Louisiana gubernatorial primary election: 107

Days until the Kentucky, Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia general elections: 131

Days until the 2020 election: 495

DEBATE NIGHT — Debate, night one, is in the books. Ten Democrats tussled on stage in Miami, and 10 more will go later tonight (tonight’s round starts at 9 p.m., and you can stream it from NBC News; the POLITICO livechat starts at 8:30 p.m.). We’re not going to declare a winner of the first night — read HuffPost’s Ariel Edwards-Levy on why that’s foolhardy — but here are some moments that stood out (and check out Campaign Pro’s Steve Shepard‘s awards and demerits for the night).

— There were plenty of policy disagreements. Candidates dug in on health care and immigration in the opening hour of the debate. Perhaps the biggest divide came on health care, where Sen. Elizabeth Warren and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio both offered they’d abolish private health insurance in favor of a government-run plan, and the rest of the field did not. Warren gave a full-throated defense of Medicare for All, while former Rep. John Delaney presented why he believed private insurance should stay. There was a Texas showdown on immigration as well: Former HUD Secretary Julián Castro pushed former Rep. Beto O’Rourke on immigration, and why O’Rourke did not support repealing Section 1325 (Vox’s Dara Lind has a good explanation on what that is). Reps. Tulsi Gabbard and Tim Ryan sparred on the military’s role on the world stage in perhaps the most heated moment of the night.

— Democrats care about reaching a diverse electorate, and that was best illustrated by Sen. Cory Booker’s performance (who, according to a tracker from The Washington Post, got the most speaking time). Booker was one of three candidates who spoke in Spanish from the debate stage (Castro and O’Rourke were the other two), and he talked about the rights of trans Americans on stage, tying it to the struggle for civil rights that black Americans still fight for today. Ryan used his time to try to call attention to the “forgotten community” that he represents.

— The real GOP boogeyman is … maybe McConnell? Make no mistake: President Donald Trump’s policies loomed large over the debate — but candidates seemed largely focused on making an affirmative case for themselves rather than teeing off on the president. However, candidates largely ducked and dodged a question on how they’d handle a Senate run by McConnell if the Democrats do not take back the upper chamber. That’s a serious question; a McConnell-led Senate could present serious roadblocks to any of the best-laid plans a Democratic president has.

— Biden who? Conspicuously absent from the conversation was former Vice President Joe Biden. No one brought up the poll leader by name in the first debate (he’s on night two), and nobody really even implicitly critiqued him.

— Ten candidates on stage is tough. Crosstalk reigned on Monday night, with candidates jockeying to get a chunk of the limited time available. It is an unenviable position for the debate moderators to trying to corral a rowdy stage — but they’ll have to do it again tonight. And with that many candidates on stage, some issues got less time, notably climate change.

THE CASH DASH — The DNC is hosting a lunchtime fundraiser today in Miami, as bigwigs flocked to the city for the debate. “The fundraiser, according to a knowledgeable party source, is expected to bring in ‘multiple hundreds of thousands of dollars,’ but officials are tamping down expectations because South Florida’s sizable donor community often leaves town in the summer to beat the heat,” POLITICO’s Maggie Severns and Marc Caputo reported.

THE COUNTERPROGRAMMING —Trump’s campaign also made an incredibly expensive digital ad buy on debate day. “The campaign purchased what’s known as the masthead on YouTube, the space at the top of the site’s main page. It’s an ad buy that can cost as much as $1 million for 24 hours of reaching every person who visits the video-sharing site,” NPR’s Tamara Keith wrote. Bully Pulpit Interactive’s Daniel Hoffmann told Keith that as many as 80 million people see masthead ads in one day.

FIX YOUR SITES — A report for a nonprofit that advocates for the blind found that none of the presidential candidates’ websites “were compliant with the ADA” and fully accessible to the blind and visually impaired. The Miami Lighthouse for the Blind said a few campaigns reached out after the report’s publication to find out how to update their respective sites.

OFF THE STAGE — Montana Gov. Steve Bullock participated in a televised town hall on WHO-TV in Des Moines after he didn’t make the cut for the debates. Earlier Wednesday, Bullock was endorsed by Story County, Iowa Democratic chair Jan Bauer, a high profile endorsement in the state, per POLITICO’s Natasha Korecki.

STAFFING UP — Rep. Seth Moulton hired Jesse Colvin as his deputy national finance director, Jewish Insider’s Ben Jacobs reported. Colvin ran (and lost) in MD-01 in 2018.

LAST DAY OF SCHOOL — Today is the last day of the Supreme Court’s session, and it’ll be a doozy for election nerds. The high court is expected to rule today on two big issues: partisan gerrymandering and the citizenship question on the census, and decisions will be handed down starting at 10 a.m. There are two cases on partisan gerrymandering in front of the court: Rucho v. Common Cause, which is about gerrymanders in North Carolina favoring Republicans, and Lamone v. Benisek, which is about Democratic gerrymandering in Maryland. What to watch: Will the Supreme Court put any guardrails on gerrymandering, or will the next round of redistricting be a free-for-all?

The citizenship question will be decided in Department of Commerce v. New York. The case has taken a major turn this week, where the Department of Justice urged the Supreme Court to definitively rule on the legality of adding a citizenship question to the census. Some lower courts have ruled against the question. In addition, activists have recently gained access to files from a deceased GOP redistricting expert that showed he may have played a role in getting the question added, another twist.

THE SENATE MAP — Adkins, a Democrat, said he’s been asked about running against McConnell in 2020, the Lexington Herald-Leader’s Daniel Desrochers reported. Adkins, who finished second in the Democratic gubernatorial primary this year, did not rule out a run: “I’m not looking in any direction, I’m keeping my options open.”

— Republican businessman Dave Lindstrom, who played defensive end for the Kansas City Chiefs, plans to launch a Senate bid in Kansas today, The Associated Press’ John Hanna reported. Lindstrom joins state Treasurer Jake LaTurner as the only Republican officially in the race to succeed retiring Sen. Pat Roberts, though a handful of other GOP officials are considering the race, namely Rep. Roger Marshall, state Attorney General Derek Schmidt, former Gov. Jeff Colyer, state Senate President Susan Wagle and former Secretary of State Kris Kobach.

— A new poll for the Alabama GOP Senate primary has the race wide open, with no clear leader. The poll from Cygnal has former Auburn coach Tommy Tuberville in first with 29 percent, followed by Rep. Bradley Byrne’s 21 percent. Roy Moore is at 13 percent, Secretary of State John Merrill is at 12 percent and state Rep. Arnold Mooney is at 2 percent (612 likely GOP voters, June 22-23).

THE HOUSE MAP — Former Rep. Lynn Jenkins (R-Kan.) is advising Republican Sara Hart Weir, who is considering a challenge to Democratic Rep. Sharice Davids in KS-03, The Kansas City Star’s Bryan Lowry reported. Jenkins’ “company will serve as Weir’s general campaign consultant if the Mission Republican runs for the seat, said Jared Suhn, another Republican strategist who is advising Weir.” Meanwhile, former state GOP chair Amanda Adkins is also considering a run in the district. Both Weir and Adkins has met with the NRCC, Lowry reported.

— Kate Schroder, a Democrat and a health-care executive, is expected to announce a challenge to GOP Rep. Steve Chabot in OH-01 soon, the Cincinnati Business Courier’s Chris Wetterich reported.

TIME FOR BACKUP — Iowa Values, a conservative nonprofit, is trying to boost Sen. Joni Ernst ahead of an expected competitive reelection fight next year. The group’s plan “includes a six-figure investment in digital advertising and a canvassing effort with the goal of knocking on 150,000 doors through the summer and fall,” Campaign Pro’s James Arkin reported. “The organization’s board includes former Rep. Tom Tauke, Johnston Mayor Paula Dierenfeld, and political strategist Sara Fagen, who previously worked on President George W. Bush’s campaigns and as a political director in his administration.”

PRIMARY PROBLEMS — Progressive groups are adding New York City Democratic Rep. Gregory Meeks to their primary target list after Tiffany Cabán, a fellow progressive, has held on to a narrow lead in the Democratic primary for Queens district attorney, BuzzFeed News’ Kadia Goba reported. Local activists signaled they wanted to target Meeks, and several progressive groups — like Brand New Congress and Justice Democrats — have been critical of him. Here’s more on the Queens DA race from The New York Times’ Jeffery Mays and Jan Ransom (the race is still too close to call, but Cabán has about a 1,100 vote lead as of Wednesday night).

ENDORSEMENT CORNER — Americans for Prosperity Action endorsed Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.), its firth endorsement of the cycle.

CODA — QUOTE OF THE DAY: “Instead of downing a shot, do a downward dog.” — Marianne Williamson’s press team in an email to reporters, suggesting they skip debate-related drinking games.

Fresh Fest heading back to Pittsburgh for its second year

WEBVTT POSITIVE MESSAGE. >> IT’S JUST A WAY TO START A CONVERSATION. MIKE: A BEER FEST KICKS OFF THIS WEEKEND, BUT IT WON’T BE YOUR AVERAGE EVENT. PITTSBURGH NOW PLAYING HOST TO THE FIRST EVER AFRICAN-AMERICAN BEER FESTIVAL. >> AMERICA RIGHT NOW IS MADE UP OF ABOUT 13% BLACK PEOPLE, BUT ONLY LESS THAN 1% OWN ANY BREWERIES, WHATSOEVER IN AMERICA, SO, WE JUST WANT TO– WE WANT TO INTRODUCE THE BLACK COMMUNITY TO THE BEER INDUSTRY, PROVID ACCESS, OPPORTUNITY, TO THE COMMUNITY SO THAT THEY ALSO CAN HAVE A PART OF A BILLION DOLLAR INDUSTRY. MIKE: FRESH FEST 2018 WILL FEATURE AFRICAN-AMERICAN BREWERS FROM ALL ACROSS THE COUNTRY AND ALSO SOME OF THE TOP LOCAL BREWERIES, COLLABORATING WITH ARTISTS AND ENTREPRENEURS. >> SOMETIMES YOU CAN LEARN A LOT ABOUT PEOPLE WHEN YOU CREATE SOMETHING TOGETHER. SO WE FELT LIKE THE BEER, CREATING THE BEER TOGETHER. THAT WOULD BE A GREAT WAY TO START CONVERSATION, GET PEOPLE TALKING AND PERHAPS MAYBE DO BUSINESS LATER ON AT SOME POINT IN THE FUTURE. >> BEER ISN’T THE ONLY THING ON THE MENU. THERE WILL ALSO BE GOODIES FROM FOOD FAVORITES SUCH AS BLOW FISH BARBECUE. LEON’S CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT AND SWEET TREAT’S FROM LEONA’S. MUSIC FROM LOCAL ARTISTS, BY RON NASH AND JOHNNIE GOODE WHO HASBEEN PLAYING ALONG SIDE LADY GAGA, COACH ELLA AND THE JOANNE TOUR. >> TO SEE THE ATTENTION IT’S GOTTEN AND TO SUPPORT SOMETHING LIKE THIS, THE FIRST OF ITS KIND HAPPENING RIGHT HERE IN PITTSBURGH I THINK IS AMAZING. >> PITTSBURGH’S ACTION NEWS 4 CAUGHT UP WITH THE MAYOR OF WILKINSBURG TODAY AT A FARMER’S MARKET EVENT AND SHE’S A COLLABORATOR OF FRESH FEST AND MANY HAVE THE IDEA OF HAVING A BREWERY THERE SOME DAY. >> MAYBE IF IT’S NOT BLACK-OWNED THERE WILL BE A CONVERSATION WITH THE BREWER HOW TO BE A GOOD NEIGHBOR AS OPPOSED TO HOW TO DISPLACE THE PEOPLE IN THAT COMMUNITY. MIKE: FRESH FEST 2018 WILL BE HOSTED AT NOVA PLACE AND ALLOY 26 THI

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Fresh Fest heading back to Pittsburgh for its second year

One year after their first event, Fresh Fest returns with another festival full of African-American owned breweries and breweries collaborating with African-American artists and entrepreneurs.The beer festival will take place Saturday, Aug. 10, at Nova Place and runs from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m, with earlier admission for VIP mentions.Fresh Fest will not only offer unlimited pours of craft beers, ciders and spirits, but also live music, art and food vendors. Flow Band, Devan Rue, Elias Khouri, BBGuns, Starship Mantis and Nappy Roots are set to play during the event, as well as various DJs.The weekend also features symposiums on Friday, Aug. 9, and a brewer’s brunch on Sunday, Aug. 11.For more information on the events and tickets, visit https://freshfestbeerfest.com/.

One year after their first event, Fresh Fest returns with another festival full of African-American owned breweries and breweries collaborating with African-American artists and entrepreneurs.

The beer festival will take place Saturday, Aug. 10, at Nova Place and runs from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m, with earlier admission for VIP mentions.

Advertisement

Fresh Fest will not only offer unlimited pours of craft beers, ciders and spirits, but also live music, art and food vendors.

Flow Band, Devan Rue, Elias Khouri, BBGuns, Starship Mantis and Nappy Roots are set to play during the event, as well as various DJs.

The weekend also features symposiums on Friday, Aug. 9, and a brewer’s brunch on Sunday, Aug. 11.

For more information on the events and tickets, visit https://freshfestbeerfest.com/.

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The seven funniest moments at the Democrats’ first debate

Last night saw the expression “clown car” gain considerable justification as a description of the Democrats’ presidential field. It was “9 candidates with no shot at anything and the tenth, the first fake Native American candidate,” in Daniel Greenfield’s apt description of the farce.  But there were moments of hilarity that punctuated the tedium, so it was not a total loss for those who subjected themselves to the entire broadcast, a marathon competition in pandering to the hard-left activists that shout the loudest on Twitter.

I confess that my secret hope of Robert F. O’Rourke jumping on top of his podium like some Iowa coffee shop counter was dashed, but the humor content was, by the standards of American political theatre, fairly impressive from the standpoint of a conservative.

In descending order of laughter potential:

#7 Bill de Blasio goes full commie

This is humor of the grim humor genre, so it loses points in the hilarity competition, but gains them in the meaningfulness column. The Mayor of New York reflects a growing sentiment among Democrats with his implicit claim to spearhead the re-assignment of wealth from the hands of those who earned it into the hands of those who want it. Bill and his crypto-commie associates know which hands are the wrong ones to have money. “There’s plenty of money… it’s just in the wrong hands”

#6 NBC declares us a bi-lingual country, with moderator asking first-ever Spanish Language question in a US presidential debate

More grim humor. Because Quebec is such a model of the utility of having two language groups hostile to each other (I am old enough to remember when Montreal was the largest city in Canada and the economic capital – a title it lost to Toronto starting the moment Francophone fanatics started kidnapping and killing official they regarded as Anglophone enemies), it was grimly funny (as in strange) to see a debate moderator pose a question in a language most viewers did not understand. This is such a good idea that I recommend MSNBC use Spanish for half of the minutes of each broadcast hour. It should do wonders for their ratings.

#5

#5 Warmist fanatic Jay Inslee’s non-sequitur claim that the filibuster is flooding Miami Beach.

Hey, it’s Democrats, Jake. Don’t expect it to make sense.

#4 Robert F. O’Rourke randomly starts speaking Spanish with a Gringo accent (very appropriate for an Irish-American, but unhelpful in the pandering department)

#3 Cory Booker tells us, “‘We Don’t Talk Enough About Trans Americans, Especially African American Trans Americans’

On behalf of handicapped differently-abled African American trans Americans, I protest this appalling lack of consideration of a minority that is even more persecuted by an America which is so horribly unjust that nobody would ever want to violate our border. We need to spend several minutes every waking hour discussing their plight. Or else we are bad people.

#2 Julian Castro calls for taxpayer-funded abortions for biological males who are pretending to be women. Because it’s only “justice.”

The words need a little parsing because there may be some attempt to wiggle lout of this absurdity:

 LESTER HOLT: Would your plan cover abortion, Mr. Secretary?”

CASTRO: “Yes, it would. I don’t believe only in reproductive freedom, I believe in reproductive justice. (Cheering and Applause) And, you know, what that means is that just because a woman, or let’s also not forget someone in the trans community, a trans female, is poor, doesn’t mean they shouldn’t have the right to exercise that right to choose. And so I absolutely would cover the right to have an abortion. More than that, everybody in this crowd and watching at home knows that in our country today, a person’s right to choose is under assault in places like Missouri, in Alabama, in Georgia. I would appoint judges to the federal bench that understand the precedent of Roe V. Wade and will respect it, and in addition to that make sure that we fight hard as we transition our health care system to one where everybody can get and exercise that right.”

A “trans female” is a biological male who wishes really, really hard he were a woman, and who goes to self-destructive ends (hormones or even genital mutilation) in order to make the masquerade slightly less ridiculous. For such a person to pretend to get pregnant, the services of an actual womb must be rented, along with an egg acquisition from a biological female.  Under such circumstances, accidental pregnancies are impossible, and any pretend pregnancy comes at considerable cost and effort on the part of more than one person.

#1 Pandering pre-emption: Cory Booker and Elizabeth Warren’s reactions when Robert F. O’Rourke randomly switches to Spanish.

This one wins the crown because it is visual, and because it captures both the pandering nature of the event and the phoniness of all the virtue-signalers. Watching a fake Hispanic worry a fake Indian and pre-empt a fake public housing project resident with a fake friend named T-bone is just fakelicious and captures the essence of the Democratic Party in 2019, You already saw the video of the Gringo-accented Spanish, so this one just gets a screen, cropped for your viewing convenience.

(Grabien screen grab, croppepd)

  

Last night saw the expression “clown car” gain considerable justification as a description of the Democrats’ presidential field. It was “9 candidates with no shot at anything and the tenth, the first fake Native American candidate,” in Daniel Greenfield’s apt description of the farce.  But there were moments of hilarity that punctuated the tedium, so it was not a total loss for those who subjected themselves to the entire broadcast, a marathon competition in pandering to the hard-left activists that shout the loudest on Twitter.

I confess that my secret hope of Robert F. O’Rourke jumping on top of his podium like some Iowa coffee shop counter was dashed, but the humor content was, by the standards of American political theatre, fairly impressive from the standpoint of a conservative.

In descending order of laughter potential:

#7 Bill de Blasio goes full commie

This is humor of the grim humor genre, so it loses points in the hilarity competition, but gains them in the meaningfulness column. The Mayor of New York reflects a growing sentiment among Democrats with his implicit claim to spearhead the re-assignment of wealth from the hands of those who earned it into the hands of those who want it. Bill and his crypto-commie associates know which hands are the wrong ones to have money. “There’s plenty of money… it’s just in the wrong hands”

#6 NBC declares us a bi-lingual country, with moderator asking first-ever Spanish Language question in a US presidential debate

More grim humor. Because Quebec is such a model of the utility of having two language groups hostile to each other (I am old enough to remember when Montreal was the largest city in Canada and the economic capital – a title it lost to Toronto starting the moment Francophone fanatics started kidnapping and killing official they regarded as Anglophone enemies), it was grimly funny (as in strange) to see a debate moderator pose a question in a language most viewers did not understand. This is such a good idea that I recommend MSNBC use Spanish for half of the minutes of each broadcast hour. It should do wonders for their ratings.

#5

#5 Warmist fanatic Jay Inslee’s non-sequitur claim that the filibuster is flooding Miami Beach.

Hey, it’s Democrats, Jake. Don’t expect it to make sense.

#4 Robert F. O’Rourke randomly starts speaking Spanish with a Gringo accent (very appropriate for an Irish-American, but unhelpful in the pandering department)

#3 Cory Booker tells us, “‘We Don’t Talk Enough About Trans Americans, Especially African American Trans Americans’

On behalf of handicapped differently-abled African American trans Americans, I protest this appalling lack of consideration of a minority that is even more persecuted by an America which is so horribly unjust that nobody would ever want to violate our border. We need to spend several minutes every waking hour discussing their plight. Or else we are bad people.

#2 Julian Castro calls for taxpayer-funded abortions for biological males who are pretending to be women. Because it’s only “justice.”

The words need a little parsing because there may be some attempt to wiggle lout of this absurdity:

 LESTER HOLT: Would your plan cover abortion, Mr. Secretary?”

CASTRO: “Yes, it would. I don’t believe only in reproductive freedom, I believe in reproductive justice. (Cheering and Applause) And, you know, what that means is that just because a woman, or let’s also not forget someone in the trans community, a trans female, is poor, doesn’t mean they shouldn’t have the right to exercise that right to choose. And so I absolutely would cover the right to have an abortion. More than that, everybody in this crowd and watching at home knows that in our country today, a person’s right to choose is under assault in places like Missouri, in Alabama, in Georgia. I would appoint judges to the federal bench that understand the precedent of Roe V. Wade and will respect it, and in addition to that make sure that we fight hard as we transition our health care system to one where everybody can get and exercise that right.”

A “trans female” is a biological male who wishes really, really hard he were a woman, and who goes to self-destructive ends (hormones or even genital mutilation) in order to make the masquerade slightly less ridiculous. For such a person to pretend to get pregnant, the services of an actual womb must be rented, along with an egg acquisition from a biological female.  Under such circumstances, accidental pregnancies are impossible, and any pretend pregnancy comes at considerable cost and effort on the part of more than one person.

#1 Pandering pre-emption: Cory Booker and Elizabeth Warren’s reactions when Robert F. O’Rourke randomly switches to Spanish.

This one wins the crown because it is visual, and because it captures both the pandering nature of the event and the phoniness of all the virtue-signalers. Watching a fake Hispanic worry a fake Indian and pre-empt a fake public housing project resident with a fake friend named T-bone is just fakelicious and captures the essence of the Democratic Party in 2019, You already saw the video of the Gringo-accented Spanish, so this one just gets a screen, cropped for your viewing convenience.

(Grabien screen grab, croppepd)

  

Amy Klobuchar had 8 minutes, 16 seconds to speak to America. Here’s how she spent them.

It was actually 8 minutes, 16 seconds (give or take a moment or two) that Minnesota’s senior U.S. senator was speaking uninterrupted during the NBC debate that featured a total of 10 Democratic hopefuls. The event was televised live under the shadow that the next night, Thursday, June 27, would feature yet another 10 Democrats seeking to unseat President Donald Trump — and that event might very well overshadow Wednesday’s, since the top of Thursday’s fight card features Joe Biden vs. Bernie Sanders.

Like all the candidates, Kobuchar’s 8 minutes and change was actually broken up into chunks that maxed out at just over a minute — the rules of the debate — and the topics weren’t necessarily of her choosing. In all, she had 10 chunks that ranged from 12 seconds to 70 seconds.

Here’s how she spent them.

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Klobuchar was the second to speak in the evening, following U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, with a question about the economy. Klobuchar suggested Warren and other candidates were giving unrealistic hopes by making “promises” about the economy, which she said “wasn’t working for everyone.” She then ticked off several initiatives to make college more affordable that stopped short of widespread free tuition and loan forgiveness.

She supports the “public option” but not a government-run single-payer system, which she equated to “kicking half of America off of their health insurance in four years.” Then she pivoted to pharmaceuticals, criticizing Trump’s promised action as “all foam and no beer.”

Grabbing a 30-second “follow-up” slot as the discussion swung to abortion, Klobuchar made an overture of solidarity with Warren and U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, the only other two women on the stage. “There’s three women up here who have fought pretty hard for a woman’s right to choose,” she said, before adding that she supported Medicare for all as “the way you move to universal health care.”

Among her points: “Immigrants do not diminish America” and “our economy needs immigrants.”

The Iran nuclear deal signed by former President Barack Obama was “imperfect, but it was a good deal at the time,” she said. Then she lit into Trump’s approach, saying “he has made us less safe than we were when he became president. … I don’t think we should conduct foreign policy in our bathrobe at 5 in the morning.”

Asked about how to represent those who want change, as well as gun rights-supporting Democrats, such as those on the Iron Range, she offered her Uncle Dick test: “Does this hurt my Uncle Dick in his deer stand?” She offered a shout-out to Parkland, Fla., student activists and school shooting survivors. The debate was held in Miami.

Asked how she would energize African American voters, Klobuchar listed bills she sponsored to improve education, child care and retirement programs, noted blacks earn less than whites, said she would protect voting rights, and noted her recent work in Congress on criminal justice reform.

In a rapid-fire round, all candidates were asked: What is America’s greatest geopolitical threat?

Her answer: China for the economy, Iran for risk of military confrontation right now.

Late in the debate, Klobuchar briefly grabbed the floor, as many candidates did at various points, to say this on the topic of working with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and the possible impeachment of Trump: “If we do not do something about Russian interference in the election and we let Mitch McConnell stop all the backup paper ballots, then we’re not going to get what we want.”

For her closing statement, Klobuchar said, “Three things to know about me: First, I listen to people, and that’s how I get things done.”

Second: I’m someone that can win and beat Donald Trump. … I have won in the reddest of districts — ones that Donald Trump won by over 20 points.”

Third: “I am not the party establishment candidate. … I don’t make all the promises up here that everyone makes, but I can promise you this: I am going to govern with integrity. I’m going to have your back.”

Julian Castro Wows In First Debate As Dems Fight To Out Liberal Each Other

MIAMI — Ten Democratic candidates wrestled over a slew of drastic policy positions, often vying to out-left each other in the first of two debates hosted by NBC News at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami.

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro managed to outshine Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren, and in a particularly compelling moment called on the rest of the candidates to endorse his plan to decriminalize border crossings. Warren made headlines for pitching the plan this week, but it’s one Castro has been pushing since April. He also beat Warren to calling for impeachment proceedings against President Trump earlier this year, but was overshadowed by her relative prominence in the field.

“The fact that the field is following him is great, that’s victory,” a spokeswoman for the Castro campaign told the Daily Caller. “That’s what we want.” She said being first to the issues shows he is willing to be politically genuine. “This is somebody who is bold, who’s not really political,” she said. (RELATED: Castro Makes Closing Statements In Spanish)

Republicans cast Castro’s plan, backed by Warren, Democratic Sen. Cory Booker and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, as extreme. Republican Rep. Dan Crenshaw said Wednesday their position is proof the Democratic Party is the party of open borders. When former Democratic Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke expressed hesitations about the plan interfering with efforts to detain criminals at the border, Castro jumped in and chided him. “If you did your homework on this issue, you would know that we should repeal this section,” Castro said.

Democratic presidential candidates New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio (L-R), Rep. Tim Ryan (D-OH), former housing secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI), Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, and former Maryland congressman John Delaney take part in the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

It was one of several striking moments in the debate on a range of issues, in which one of the candidates jumped in to establish him or herself as even further to the left of the group on a given position that is already decidedly liberal.

The discussion of the House-passed Equality Act was another one. Democrats in the House voted unanimously in support of the bill, which would enact sweeping changes to the Civil Rights Act, making gender identity a protected class and adding a host of new spaces in which it is illegal to discriminate against any protected class. The bill would require schools to allow transgender athletes to compete with girls and use their locker rooms and bathrooms, for example.

The top Democratic candidates have endorsed the bill, and most of those on stage Wednesday have expressed support for some or all of its tenets. But Booker jumped in at one point and proclaimed that an overhaul of civil rights law is “not enough,” because the country needs to do more about violence against the transgender community. “We do not talk enough about trans Americans, especially African-American trans Americans, and the incredibly high rates of murder right now,” he said. “We don’t talk enough about how many children, about 30 percent of LGBTQ kids, who do not go to school because of fear.”

Castro again pushed the limits of a consensus, boasting on abortion: “I don’t believe only in reproductive freedom, I believe in reproductive justice.” He said it’s important that every American have access to abortion, including transgender women.

While a majority of Americans support Roe v. Wade, polling on abortion has long shown big majorities of the country do not support unlimited access to abortion and support restricting it to the first and second trimesters. (RELATED: Castro Claims Men Can Have Babies During Democratic Debate)

Inslee also vied for the most pro-abortion title, boasting his healthcare plan would force abortion coverage and claiming he is the only one on the stage to have passed a law enabling more access to abortion for women. That prompted Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar to chime in pointedly, “I just want to say, there’s three women up here that have fought pretty hard for a woman’s right to choose.” (RELATED: Inslee Brags About Forcing Abortion Coverage)

MIAMI, FLORIDA – JUNE 26: (L-R) Former housing secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) react during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

On health care more broadly, all of the candidates staked out a position in favor of a universal health care system, and a couple of them went as far as to say they would abolish private health insurance. Former Maryland Democratic Rep. John Delaney was a moderating voice here. He said based on what he’s heard about Medicare pricing, a “Medicare for All” plan would be devastating for hospitals. “We are basically supporting a bill that would have every hospital close,” he said. But his plan, too, would mandate universal health insurance.

On climate, the candidates mapped out drastic and far left positions. Inslee has built his campaign on combating climate change. His $9 trillion proposal would mandate net-zero carbon emissions for the entire U.S. economy by 2045, which would include transitioning completely to electric cars, carbon zero electricity, and zero carbon pollution in all new commercial and residential buildings — a transformation of the U.S. economy.

Inslee said he would get rid of the Senate filibuster as president, in order to jam his plan through Congress if he has to. It’s an emergency measure, he said, and declared it would “save” Miami from going underwater. He’s not the only candidate delivering drastic climate proposals, just the most detailed. Four of the other candidates — Booker, Warren, Castro and O’Rourke — named climate change as the greatest threat in the final question of the debate.

Nevertheless, the Democratic Party doesn’t seem concerned about alienating moderates, at least not at this stage. A spokesman for Ohio Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan told the Caller he believes the party platform will hold broad appeal. Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez scoffed at the notion that the party might be veering too far left to win the general election.

He brought up abortion as a case in point, saying 75 percent of Americans support Roe v. Wade, and asserting it’s the Republican Party that is in the minority. “The Democratic Party platform speaks to a range of Americans,” he told the Caller.

Hawaii Democratic Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio were also on the stage Wednesday night. NBC will host the second round of debates Thursday, where former Vice President Joe Biden and Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders will face off against the remaining eight candidates, including guru Marianne Williamson and entrepreneur Andrew Yang.

Key Quotes From the First Democratic Presidential Debate

Ten of the Democrats competing for the party’s nomination for the 2020 U.S. presidential election took part in a two-hour debate Wednesday night that included discussion of several topics such as health care, immigration, climate change and how the country should engage with the rest of the world. Here is a key quote from each of the participants as they tried to convince voters they are the person who should compete against President Donald Trump next November:

Democratic presidential hopeful Mayor of New York City Bill de Blasio participates in the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 26, 2019.

Bill de Blasio
“The way that American citizens have been told that immigrants somehow created their misery and their pain and their challenges, for all the American citizens out there who feel you’re falling behind or feel the American dream is not working for you, the immigrants didn’t do that to you. The big corporations did that to you. The 1% did that to you. We need to be the party of working people, and that includes a party of immigrants.”

Democratic presidential hopeful U.S. Senator from New Jersey Cory Booker participates in the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 26, 2019.

Cory Booker
“We’re talking about this as a health care issue, but in communities like mine — low-income communities — it’s an education issue because kids who don’t have health care are not going to succeed in school. It is an issue for jobs and employment because people who do not have good health care do not succeed at work. It’s even a retirement issue because in my community African Americans have a lower life expectancy because of poorer health care. And so where I stand is very clear: Health care, it’s not just a human right, it should be an American right.”

Democratic presidential hopeful former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julian Castro participates in the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign in Miami, June 26, 2019.

Julian Castro
“On Day 1, I would do that executive order that would address metering, and then I would follow that up in my first 100 days with immigration reform that would honor asylum claims, that would put undocumented immigrants — as long as they haven’t committed a serious crime — on a pathway to citizenship. And then we’d get to the root cause of the issue, which is we need a Marshall Plan for Honduras and Guatemala and El Salvador so that people can find safety and opportunity at home instead of coming to the United States to seek it.”

Former US Representative for Maryland John Delaney speaks during the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 26, 2019.

John Delaney
“I do think no one is above the law, and this president — who is lawless — should not be above the law. But I will tell you, Rachel, the one thing when you’re out doing as much campaigning as I’ve done — 400 events, all 99 counties in Iowa — this is not the #1 issue the American people ask us about. It’s not. They want to know what we’re going to do for health care, how we’re going to lower pharmaceutical prices, how we’re going to build infrastructure, what we’re going to do to create jobs in their communities.”

Democratic presidential hopeful Governor of Washington Jay Inslee speaks during the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 26, 2019.

Jay Inslee
“Trudi and I have three grandchildren, we love them all, and when I was thinking about running for president I made a decision. I decided on my last day on Earth I wanted to look them in the eye and tell them I did everything humanly possible to protect them from the ravages of the climate crisis. And I know to a moral certainty that if we do not have the next president who commits to this as the top priority, it will not get done.”

Democratic presidential hopeful U.S. Representative from Hawaii Tulsi Gabbard speaks during the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 26, 2019.

Tulsi Gabbard
“For too long, our leaders have failed us, taking us from one regime-change war to the next, leading us into a new Cold War and arms race, costing us trillions of our hard-earned taxpayer dollars and countless lives. This insanity must end. As president, I will take your hard-earned taxpayer dollars and instead invest those dollars into serving your needs, things like health care, a green economy, good-paying jobs, protecting our environment and so much more.”

Democratic presidential hopeful U.S. Senator from Minnesota Amy Klobuchar speaks during the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 26, 2019.

Amy Klobuchar
“I would make sure that if there is any possibility of conflict — and we’re having this debate in Congress right now — that he comes to Congress for an authorization of military force. I would do that. And this president is literally, every single day, 10 minutes away from going to war, one tweet away from going to war, and I don’t think we should conduct foreign policy in our bathrobe at five in the morning, which is what he does.”

Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke, a former U.S. Representative for Texas’ 16th congressional district, participates in the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign in Miami, June 26, 2019.

Beto O’Rourke
“We would not detain any family fleeing violence, in fact fleeing the deadliest countries on the face of the planet today. We would implement a family case management program so they can be cared for in the community at a fraction of the cost. And then we would rewrite our immigration laws in our own image. Free Dreamers forever from any fear of deportation by making them U.S. citizens here in this country. Invest in solutions in Central America, work with regional stakeholders so there’s no reason to make that 2,000 mile journey to this country.”

Democratic presidential hopeful U.S. Representative from Ohio Tim Ryan speaks during the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 26, 2019.

Tim Ryan
“We have a perception problem with the Democratic Party. We are not connecting to the working class people in the very states that I represent in Ohio, in the industrial Midwest. We’ve lost all connection. We have got to change the center of gravity of the Democratic Party from being coastal and elitist and Ivy League, which is the perception, to somebody from the forgotten communities that have been left behind for the last 30 years, to get those workers back on our side so we can say we’re going to build electric vehicles, we’re going to build solar panels.”

Democratic presidential hopeful Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren participates in the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 26, 2019.

Elizabeth Warren
“I would make certain that every woman has access to the full range of reproductive health care services, and that includes birth control, it includes abortion, it includes everything for a woman. And I want to add on that. It’s not enough for us to expect the courts to protect us. Forty-seven years ago, Roe v. Wade was decided, and we’ve looked to the courts all that time as state after state has undermined Roe, has put in exceptions, has come right up to the edge of taking away protection. We have now an America where most people support Roe v. Wade. We need to make that federal law.”