Charlotte Center City Partners Announces More Weekend Initiatives Invitation to safely rediscover and commit to the innovative small businesses, vibrant cultural institutions, and beloved places

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Moira Quinn

704-363-1298

mquinn@charlottecentercity.org

Adam Rhew

704-891-4396

arhew@charlottecentercity.org

Weekend of November 20, 2020

Show UP for Uptown

UptownCharlotte.com

CHARLOTTE (November 18, 2020)— A “walking theatrical mystery” throughout Uptown, an Art Pop sTREEt Gallery from Truist and Lowes, your favorite “Elf” on the screen, free entertainment, Street Eats outside of some of your favorite restaurants, adult beverages in Victoria Yards, plus free or $1 parking…and Panthers Game Day AGAIN! It’s all happening in Uptown Charlotte this weekend

This is an open invitation to all to #ShowUpForUptown as we add new and exciting activities this weekend. These continuing and new initiatives from Charlotte Center City Partners, Blumenthal Performing Arts, the City, CRVA and others are in support of retail and hospitality businesses and restaurants in Uptown and will happen every weekend through year-end.

Every weekend, we are closing specific blocks of Tryon Street with a phased approach starting with the block between 5th and 6th Streets from Friday at 5:00pm through Sunday at 9:00pm. Cross streets will remain open. We are activating other spaces with cool events and amplifying events put on by our partners. You can find details at UPTownCharlotte.com and below:

Friday, November 20

Movies at Victoria Yards: Elf

Free! Registration required: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/movies-at-victoria-yards-elf-tickets-127865953509

Victoria Yards – 7th and Tryon – 408 N. Tryon Street (see parking information below)

6:30pm Live music, food trucks and Resident Culture with adult beverages!! (limited to 21 and up)

8:00pm – movie begins

Socially distanced seating, masks required and COVID screening questionnaire upon admittance. We take your safety seriously!

Friday November 20 – December 13

Art Heist – A True Crime Immersive Theatre Experience

Grab your coat and get ready for an immersive true crime experience!!! This is an outdoor “walking theatrical”, where groups of 35 walk a route, meeting up with actors along the way to receive clues that allow them to ultimately “solve” an art theft. Put on by Blumenthal Performing Arts, this movable mystery takes the masked and socially distanced audience along a route throughout Uptown, with mysterious stops and characters along the way! Opens on the 20th and runs through December 13. Go to Blumenthal Performing Arts for tickets to your mysterious evening out!

November 21-December 20

Art Pop sTREEt Gallery

Truist Plaza

Charlotte Center City Partners in partnership with Art Pop Street Gallery and Lowe’s is creating a holiday art installation in Uptown Charlotte. Local and regional artists will transform the Truist Plaza into a holiday winter wonderland of uniquely decorated Christmas trees. Lowe’s has provided the pre-lit Christmas trees and assorted decorations for the artists to use in their creations. The art installation will be on display from November 21st – December 20th.

“ArtPop Street Gallery is thrilled to partner with our friends again at Center City Partners to promote and commission local artists to bring joy to Uptown through decorating trees for the holidays.

Stop by, visit and engage with the artists! Fill your heart with holiday cheer.

Local artists of Charlotte, the Triad and Atlanta regions will be creating traditional as well as uniquely decorated trees for all to enjoy!” – Wendy Hickey, Executive Director, ArtPop Street Gallery

Saturday, November 21

Saturday fun at Victoria Yards

7th and Tryon – 408 N. Tryon Street

Noon – 5:00pm

Enjoy live music, food trucks and cold brews from Resident Culture

Must be 21 and up

Thursday, November 19 – Saturday, November 21

Middle C Jazz Club Anniversary Celebration of Stevie Wonder

300 S. Brevard Street

A jazz celebration of stevie wonder presented by Noel Freidline. Middle C Jazz One Year Anniversary Show Featuring Noel Freidline, Maria Howell, Adam McKnight, Juan Rollan, Zach Page, & Justin Varnes.

Friday – Sunday

Street Eats – We are participating in the City’s Street Eats program by closing specific blocks of Tryon St. in Uptown, and by placing tables in the sidewalks and curb lanes. This allows restaurants to have additional outdoor seating. We are partnering with the new Uptown-focused Intown Delivery Service, to allow restaurants outside of those specific blocks to have food delivered.

  • Street Eats hours are Friday at 5pm until Sunday at 9pm

  • 204 North, SIP and The Asbury are participating in the Street Eats Program with extended patios.

  • The block will have picnic tables and special lighting for an inviting experience

  • Center City Ambassadors will be on hand to answer questions and provide hospitality 

  • Food Trucks are scheduled throughout the weekend.

Street Closure – Tryon Street between 5th and 6th streets will be closed from Friday at 12pm and until Sunday at 10pm

Programming – We are providing free outdoor programming in and around the closed blocks. The programming includes street performers and musical entertainment.

Discounted Parking and Ride Transit – We are also pleased to announce partnerships with Bank of America, Truist and Cousins for almost 4,000 free and $1 parking spaces in Uptown from Friday at 5:00 P.M. until Sunday at 9:00 P.M. in support of this initiative for Uptown. Cars must enter decks after 5:00 P.M. on Friday and vacate by Sunday at 9:00 P.M to qualify for this special flat-rate pricing. The decks are:

  • Seventh Street Station – Free

  • Fifth Third Center – $1.00

  • Truist (formerly Hearst) Parking Deck – $1.00

As always, public transit is a great option. Check RideTransit.org for schedules.

7th Street Public Market – Freshlist has made it easier to check off your Thanksgiving shopping list. Preorder your Turkey and Pies now to pick up at the Market on November 24th. And Jimmy Pearls, our popup dinner concept, will be extending hours! Starting November 12th they will be open for lunch Thursdays 11:30-2pm or preorder for Friday & Saturday night pick up between 4-7pm. For a decade, locally owned restaurants and retailers in the 7th Street Public Market have created an urban Public Market vibe. Weather permitting, the Market will have a special pop-up Sidewalk Markets on Saturdays from 11:00 A.M. until 4:00 P.M. The indoor Market is open Thursday – Sunday from 10:00 A.M until 5:00 P.M. with coffee, breakfast/lunch/dinner, juice, fruit specialties, salads, wine by the bottle and glass, beer on weekends, Italian specialties, salads and desserts, as well as special retail finds, specialty popcorn. Try out the new curbside pickup and delivery Uptown. There are two new businesses to check out: Good Earth Essentials and Momo Station. For more info, visit 7thstreetpublicmarket.com.

Night Out at Mint Museum Uptown

Friday, November 20

6:00pm – 9:00pm

Plan a Friday night out at Mint Museum Uptown complete with art, live music, and a cash bar. Enjoy live music and a cash bar at Mint Museum Uptown from 6 PM to 9 PM every Friday night. Pre Vox Trio will perform on the Van Allen terrace on November 20. Be sure to reserve your timed ticket in advance.

Inter|Sectionality: Diaspora Art from the Creole City

Harvey B. Gantt Center for African- American Arts + Culture

Now – January 2021

Gallery admission

A bold, multi-regional, multi- disciplinary curatorial collaboration and exploration of the emergence of the “Creole City” as a local, regional and global phenomenon. This collaboration provides a lens through which communities and community leaders internationally can begin to better understand themselves, their diversities and their unlimited possibilities.

Free Self-guided Tours in Uptown

https://uptowncharlotte.com/post/walk-this-way-free-self-guided-tours-through-uptown-charlotte

Cool Globes “Hot Ideas for a Cooler Planet”- Installed at the end of June, the globes are displayed along N. Tryon from Trade to 11th. Public art with a purpose, Cool Globes are designed to educate and inspire on solutions to climate change, with each globe illustrating individual steps we can each take.

There are a total of 35 globe-trotting globes in Charlotte, 7 of which are designed by local Charlotte artists: Max Dowdle, Britt Flood, Norma Gely, Rosalie Grubb, Jackie London, Rosalia Weiner, and the students at Trinity Episcopal School. The Cool Globes Charlotte exhibit was made possible with the support of Discovery Place, Trane Technologies and the City of Charlotte.

Charlotte Joy Rides, Made Possible by Blue Cross and Blue Shield – As part of this activation, the bike share system Charlotteans have loved and trusted since 2012 has launched a new and improved bike experience called Charlotte Joy Rides. There is now a fleet of 343 e-assist bicycles and the addition of 4 docking stations throughout Center City, bringing the system total to 33 stations. The bikes are all painted as art bikes by seven of Charlotte’s best muralists. And, as part of this re-launch, Charlotte Joy Rides is providing simplified, introductory pricing:

  • Flash Pass: $5 for 30 minutes

  • Joy Pass: $30 All Day (no docking required in a 24-hour period)

  • Monthly and Annual Memberships: $50 per month or $150 per year

  • All bikes must be docked at the end of your chosen ride

The Flash and Joy Passes are available at any Charlotte Joy Rides kiosk, on our mobile app or website. Subscriptions (monthly or annual memberships) are available on the app or website, CharlotteJoyRides.com. Charlotte Joy Rides is accessible to all. Passes will be made available on an as-needed basis to anyone who would like to use the system but cannot afford the fees.

Website – We are also utilizing our new website UptownCharlotte.com to give you a one-stop option to find dining, entertainment and things to do all in one place.

These are clearly unique times. They require intentionality, creativity, listening, and action. Our team has been working on a multifaceted plan to support the residents and businesses that are foundational to this place and its character…while positioning Center City and specifically Uptown, to thrive in the recovery. We’re making it easy to Show UP for Uptown.

The face and personality of Uptown is driven by small businesses, smart entrepreneurs and by so many in the world of hospitality who have faced tough choices throughout this pandemic. Those tough choices continue. But we continue to believe that our thriving Uptown community offers Charlotte the recipe for restoration and economic recovery. Our goal is to provide an opportunity for everyone to #ShowUPForUptown.

About Charlotte Center City Partners

Charlotte Center City Partners envisions and implements strategies and actions to drive the economic, social and cultural development of Charlotte’s Center City. The organization envisions a Center City in Charlotte that is viable, livable, memorable, and sustainable, with modern infrastructure, a tapestry of unique neighborhoods, and a diversity of thriving businesses. For more information, please visit www.charlottecentercity.org www.UptownCharlotte.com RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Mass COVID-19 vaccination gets a dry run in Louisiana parking lot

NEW YORK — A COVID-19 vaccine may be months from reaching millions of Americans. Getting all those shots into arms will be a monumental task. Shreveport, La., is getting ready now.

The city recently completed a test run, one of about a dozen across the state. Health officials there organized the community’s first-ever drive-thu flu shot clinic in the massive parking lot of the Louisiana state fairgrounds.

Drivers rolled down their windows and rolled up their sleeves as they pulled up to tents for the largest vaccination event the regional health department has ever hosted. Cheerful and fast-working nurses jabbed them with vaccines. Within about five minutes, people were on their way, exiting the parking lot while passing a row of food stands selling corn dogs, roasted nuts and lemonade.

In the near future, that’s just the way officials hope it will go for a COVID-19 vaccine. A poor state that’s seen its share of hurricanes, floods and tornadoes, Louisiana is trying to get out front of the challenge. The state’s health department decided early on to run test clinics in each of its nine public-health regions, using this winter’s flu shot as practice to eventually distribute millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses.

“Unlike with testing, we have the luxury to have four to five months to plan,” said Frank Welch, a doctor who is Louisiana’s immunization director.

Still, the pressure is on. The worst pandemic to ravage the country in a century is raging out of control and hospitals are filling up across the country as winter approaches. Fortunately, formulas from Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE as well as Moderna Inc. have displayed stunning efficacy in early test results, with initial shipments perhaps just weeks away.

But even in the best case scenario of a timely vaccine approval, state governments will struggle to get the rampaging virus under control. And they must do so amid a chaotic transfer of presidential power and a lack of clear policy guidance. Making matters more challenging is the lack of confidence many Americans have in the safety of a vaccine. Only about half of adults say they would get a COVID-19 vaccine if one were available, according to a September survey from the Pew Research Center.

Louisiana has an ambitious plan to vaccinate its nearly 5 million residents. The first doses will be limited, most likely, to a few health-care workers. Louisiana has a high number of infections and deaths as a percentage of its population. About 212,000 people have fallen ill with the novel coronavirus and more than 6,200 have died.

Shreveport leans Democratic, with surrounding Caddo Parish having voted for Joe Biden in the presidential election. Mayor Adrian Perkins calls it the most conservative Democratic parish in the entire state. Mask wearing and social distancing have been a hard sell. Now, like places everywhere in the U.S., the novel coronavirus has upended lives and routines.

The state fairgrounds are just off Interstate 49, which runs along the west side of the city, a predominantly Black area. Nationally, Black Americans have suffered disproportionately. Cases of the novel coronavirus are 2.6 times higher among Black Americans compared with Whites, and deaths are 2.1 times higher, according to the CDC.

Like most Southern cities, Perkins said, Shreveport is divided into two distinct sections, and the interstate is the proverbial “tracks” that separate them. Signs of economic hardships are apparent all over the west side. Paint peels off some houses, while others are boarded up and are crumbling into ruins.

The more prosperous downtown is struggling, too. Shreveport’s economy, like that of so many communities in the U.S., hinges on defeating the virus. The streets downtown are quiet these days. Workers are at home. Theaters remain closed. Signs in the restaurants and cafes that are open ask people to wear masks.

Casinos, massive employers in the area, are trying to survive. One has already closed for good. At Sam’s Town, plexiglass separates slot machines, with many turned off for social distancing. Next door, Eldorado ends table games early so workers can clean the poker chips at the end of the night. Guests wear masks except to sip their drinks and take drags of their cigarettes. Restaurants are going through similar contortions to remain open and hold on to customers.

The fairgrounds flu-vaccine clinic help show what the state is up against. Cars trickle in more slowly than regional public health director Martha Whyte would like. The day started with a supply of 1,500 shots but only 400 people showed up to get their flu vaccine. Whyte, who is a doctor, still deems the day a success. “I just wish we had more people,” she said.

Perhaps, she speculated, most people already received their flu shots: It’s November and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encouraged people to get vaccinated before the end of October.

Ensuring vaccines are distributed equitably is a priority of the state’s COVID-19 vaccination campaign. Perkins and Whyte agree the fairgrounds offer a good place to reach the most vulnerable residents, even if many won’t be able to drive there on their own. The fairgrounds run along a bus route, which could easily enable walk-up shots.

A more aggressive outreach is also on the drawing board: deploying groups of health workers to homeless shelters, food banks, jails or other venues. The state started using such “strike teams” two years ago to vaccinate at-risk people during outbreaks of hepatitis A. It now uses them for flu shots. Strike teams could also go to homes of people unable to get to doctors’ offices, pharmacies and other medical settings, Welch said.

Clinics and strike teams will work only if people agree to get a shot. Whyte, the regional health director, worries that not enough people are taking the pandemic seriously. She uses her personal experience to educate doubters: Her husband spent two months on a ventilator, nearly dying before receiving convalescent plasma from the region’s first coronavirus patient. Even so, she’s been crudely attacked on social media and once compared to the Soviet Union’s Joseph Stalin.

“People aren’t happy with the restrictions, and they aren’t happy with having to isolate or quarantine, so you sometimes have to tell people things they don’t want to hear,” Whyte said. “All I can do is tell them what this virus is, what it’s going to do and what they need to do in response.”

At the drive-thru clinic, cars were few and widely spaced out as the day wore on, giving nurses from the health department time to sit in lawn chairs and chat, some holding umbrellas to shield themselves from an unseasonably hot sun.

Nurse Dawn Leone’s family had been meeting on Sundays to worship together when someone brought home the virus. Her husband, mother and father were all in the hospital with COVID-19. In total, nine relatives, including Leone, tested positive. Her mother and husband recovered. Her father died.

“Maybe it’s old news and we’re onto other things,” Leone said, “but it’s a real struggle for families.”

Fine Art Shippers Offers Custom Art Framing Services in New York

Fine Art Shippers Offers Custom Art Framing Services in New York – African American News Today – EIN Presswire

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As Daily Cases climb toward 200K, “Trump is Playing Golf” (to the same accompaniment as “Whitey on the Moon”)

From Informed Comment

The G-20 summit, attended virtually by the leaders of the 20 countries with the largest gross domestic products, was orchestrated this year from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. That is a scandal in itself, since the Saudi regime is responsible for the murder of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi in 2018 and an ongoing set of atrocities in Yemen that are near to causing mass starvation in that country. Kevin Liptak at CNN reports that Trump dropped in on the conference virtually from the White House from 8 am to 10 am on Saturday, but that his attention quickly wandered, since he started again posting his unhinged Twitter rants about how the election was stolen from him.

Then at 10 am Trump jumped in his limousine and headed for his golf course in Sterling, Va., skipping an important side conference on “Pandemic Preparedness” in which French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in spoke. Germany has had 13,884 COVID-19 deaths and South Korea has had 503 deaths. The US has had 255,823 deaths. It is a bigger country, but even proportionally the German and South Korean totals are a fraction of those Trump has let die. Some 1,400 Americans are dying of COVID-19 daily, which is, as Dr. Seema Yasmin at CNN points out, like three airliners crashing every single day.

In the US, where Trump has done almost nothing to stop the pandemic, and in some instances has actively made it worse, there were nearly 200,000 new cases on Friday. South Korea is freaking out about 350 new daily cases. Trump could certainly have learned something from an actually competent leader like Moon Jae-in or Angela Merkel.

The following commentary is inspired by (or, rather, stolen from) Gil Scott-Heron, author of the 1970 Whitey on the Moon, about which Genius.com writes, “In this Gil Scott-Heron piece about the first moon landing, the poet expresses his unhappiness at having his taxes dedicated to bringing ‘whitey’ to the moon while he, and all Black Americans, are held captive in poverty due to racist government policies. He uses his sister Nell’s condition to emphasize the neglect that black people are suffering while white society uses the nation’s wealth to make expensive journeys into space.”

Trump is Playing Golf

A virus killed my grandma Belle.
(and Trump is playing golf)
Her bronchia began to swell
(and Trump is playing golf)
We cannot pay her doctor’s bill.
(and Trump is playing golf)
Since COVID it’s been all downhill.
(while Trump is playing golf.)
The Man’s evicting us tonight.
(’cause Trump is playing golf.)
No heat, no water and no light.
(but Trump is playing golf.)
Why is he gettin’ rid of me?
(’cause Trump is playing golf.)
He’s lookin’ for a rich lessee.
(with Trump playing golf.)
The lockdown cancelled my paycheck,
Virus makin’ me a nervous wreck,
Instacart price is goin’ up,
An’ as if all that sh*t wasn’t enough
The virus killed my grandma Belle.
(with Trump playing golf)
Her bronchia began to swell
and Trump is playing golf
Was all that money I made last year
for Trump to play his golf?
How come I got no health care here?
Hmm! Trump is playing golf
Y’know I just ’bout had my fill
of Trump playing golf.
I think I’ll send these funeral bills
Express mail
to Trump playing golf.

(I declare the satirical lyrics above, “Trump is Playing Golf,” to be Creative Commons, so if anyone has a set of bongos and a good voice, feel free to record them).

Ace Records: “Gil Scott-Heron – Whitey On the Moon (Official Audio)”

[embedded content]

Tale of Two Air Forces: How Tuskegee Airmen bridged the divide

… military history, particularly of African Americans in the U.S. … Airmen were the first African American aviators actually established in … still the standard, with African Americans being given secondary rolls … ‘in your face’ racism, but racism is still there in … RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News

Open Letter To President-Elect Biden – Liberian Daily Observer

… Indian Reservations and African American Communities across America … African American Congressman Clyburn led African Americansracism, banished, forgotten and colonized in Liberia, as well as  African Americans … of Liberia, African American Communities and … RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News

Should men be concerned about prostate cancer?

“When you look at five-year survivals — and that’s a metric that most organizations use to determine prostate cancer aggressiveness — prostate cancer, even in some of the advanced stages, still has nearly 100% five-year survival. And that’s different than the perspective of someone having pancreatic cancer or brain cancer, where the five-year survival is not even 15% at times,” says Dr. Raymond Pak, a Mayo Clinic urologist. “Between five to 10 years, survival for untreated prostate cancer also can approach 100% for certain types of prostate cancer. So I do counsel patients based on that and tell them to put things in perspective. I encourage all my patients to make long-term plans still and to have a positive outlook because the landscape of prostate cancer treatment is also changing, and it’s a dynamic process.”

Early detection often is key to survival. Prostate cancer screening guidelines consider a number of risk factors, including age, race and family history.

“Currently, the American Urologic Association supports screening for men at average risk between the ages of 55 and 69. And then prior to 55, it should really be a shared decision and discussion based on risk factors,” says Dr. Pak. “So what are those risk factors? Men with a family history of prostate cancer is one example. Significant family history would be a first-degree relative, such as a father or brother with prostate cancer, or a more distant relative, but at least two affected distant relatives with prostate cancer. And then any other strong family history of hereditary colon, breast cancers, as well as prostate, of course, should be considered in a younger age group. So between 40 and 55 is that high-risk group that we need to screen for if there’s a strong family history or race. African American men should also be considered to be screened earlier under 55.”

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Prostate cancer screening involves the combination of a prostate exam by a health care provider and a prostate-specific antigen blood test. Unlike some types of cancer, prostate cancer often has no symptoms. And if a man develops symptoms, it usually means the cancer is at an advanced stage.

“Symptoms such as blood in the urine, painful urination, inability to urinate, or pain in the hips and spine ― those can all be very advanced presentations of prostate cancer. So that’s exactly the reason why we screen men actively in the specific age groups, because there are no symptoms whatsoever,” says Dr. Pak.

Low-risk, nonaggressive prostate cancer is the most common type detected. And, in those cases, active surveillance usually is recommended. Your health care provider closely monitors the cancer with tests to see if the cancer is growing or causing symptoms. If the cancer has progressed to a more advanced stage, then treatment options may include surgery, radiation, medications and other therapies.

Mass COVID-19 vaccination gets a dry run in a Louisiana parking lot

In the near future, that’s just the way officials hope it will go for a COVID-19 vaccine. A poor state that’s seen its share of hurricanes, floods and tornadoes, Louisiana is trying to get out front of the challenge.

The state’s health department decided early on to run test clinics in each of its nine public-health regions, using this winter’s flu shot as practice to eventually distribute millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses.

“Unlike with testing, we have the luxury to have four to five months to plan,” said Frank Welch, a doctor who is Louisiana’s immunisation director.

Shreveport, Louisiana recently completed a test run for distributing an eventual coronavirus vaccine, using a community drive-thru clinic for flu shots.

Shreveport, Louisiana recently completed a test run for distributing an eventual coronavirus vaccine, using a community drive-thru clinic for flu shots. Credit:Bloomberg

Still, the pressure is on. The worst pandemic to ravage the country in a century is raging out of control and hospitals are filling up across the country as winter approaches. Fortunately, formulas from Pfizer and BioNTech SE as well as Moderna have displayed stunning efficacy in early test results, with initial shipments perhaps just weeks away.

But even in the best case scenario of a timely vaccine approval, state governments will struggle to get the rampaging virus under control. And they must do so amid a chaotic transfer of presidential power and a lack of clear policy guidance.

Making matters more challenging is the lack of confidence many Americans have in the safety of a vaccine. Only about half of adults say they would get a COVID-19 vaccine if one were available, according to a September survey from the Pew Research Centre.

Dr Martha Whyte organises healthcare workers during a drive-thru flu shot clinic at the Louisiana State Fairgrounds in Shreveport, Louisiana.

Dr Martha Whyte organises healthcare workers during a drive-thru flu shot clinic at the Louisiana State Fairgrounds in Shreveport, Louisiana.Credit:Bloomberg

Louisiana has an ambitious plan to vaccinate its nearly 5 million residents. The first doses will be limited, most likely, to a few health-care workers. Louisiana has a high number of infections and deaths as a percentage of its population. About 212,000 people have fallen ill with the novel coronavirus and more than 6200 have died.

Shreveport leans Democratic, with surrounding Caddo Parish having voted for Joe Biden in the presidential election. Mayor Adrian Perkins calls it the most conservative Democratic parish in the entire state. Mask wearing and social distancing have been a hard sell. Now, like places everywhere in the US, the novel coronavirus has upended lives and routines.

The state fairgrounds are just off Interstate 49, which runs along the west side of the city, a predominantly black area. Nationally, black Americans have suffered disproportionately. Cases of the novel coronavirus are 2.6 times higher among black Americans compared with Whites, and deaths are 2.1 times higher, according to the CDC.

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“People aren’t happy with the restrictions, and they aren’t happy with having to isolate or quarantine, so you sometimes have to tell people things they don’t want to hear,” Whyte said. “All I can do is tell them what this virus is, what it’s going to do and what they need to do in response.”

At the drive-thru clinic, cars were few and widely spaced out as the day wore on, giving nurses from the health department time to sit in lawn chairs and chat, some holding umbrellas to shield themselves from an unseasonably hot sun.

Nurse Dawn Leone’s family had been meeting on Sundays to worship together when someone brought home the virus. Her husband, mother and father were all in the hospital with COVID-19. In total, nine relatives, including Leone, tested positive. Her mother and husband recovered. Her father died.

“Maybe it’s old news and we’re onto other things,” Leone said, “but it’s a real struggle for families.”

AP

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