NFL Hall of Famer Alan Page exhibits slavery artifacts in time for Super Bowl

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — An iron collar that kept slaves in bondage. A branding iron that marked human beings as someone’s property. A photograph of black babies captioned as “alligator bait.” A fine china plate with gold lettering that says, “KKK ‘God Give Us Men.'”

They’re among the artifacts of slavery and segregation collected by NFL Hall of Famer and retired Minnesota Supreme Court Justice Alan Page and his wife, Diane Sims Page. They went on display this month in time for Super Bowl visitors and the thousands of other people expected to flock to downtown Minneapolis for the festivities. The exhibit, “TESTIFY: Americana from Slavery to Today,” runs through Feb. 6 at the Minneapolis Central Library.

While a sign at the entrance warns that some items inside might be disturbing, there are also messages of hope and promise. There’s a banner that was held by a mourner in 1865, when a funeral train took President Abraham Lincoln’s body home to Illinois. The banner reads, “Our Country Shall Be One Country!” Page said it moved him to tears when he first saw it.

“For me it transports me back to that time and that place,” Alan Page said.

Signs that once enforced segregation in the South hang from a wall down the center of the gallery. They designated restrooms as “white” or “colored,” and marked the “colored waiting room” at train and bus stations. Just across from it is an assembly of vibrant pictures by black artists, showing how African-Americans reclaimed control over their own narrative. Diane Page said the contrast between the “oppressive and expressive” is deliberate.

Alan Page, a feared member of the Vikings’ Purple People Eaters defensive line in the 1970s, played in all four of their Super Bowl appearances. He’s one of only two defensive players ever voted the NFL MVP. He also became the first black justice on the Minnesota Supreme Court, serving 22 years until he hit the mandatory retirement age of 70 in 2015.

The Pages timed the exhibit to coincide with the Super Bowl on Feb. 4 in Minneapolis, but he noted that it also comes “at this time when white supremacy is raising its ugly head” in ways that he thought he would never see again.

“We hope the exhibit will challenge people by seeing what took place in the past, and challenge them in ways that will cause them to think about taking action, not only to prevent them from happening again, but to end the effects of that past, the effects that still linger today,” he said.

It’s one thing to see a picture of an artifact from that era; it’s another to actually stand in front of it, said Lois Langer Thompson, director of the Hennepin County Library system. She said the library’s location on the Nicollet Mall pedestrian zone, the site of a 10-day fan festival with free concerts and other attractions, makes it convenient for visitors to stop by and see the exhibit — and warm up.

Diane Page started the collection about 30 years ago after a friend pointed out that missing amid the sleek decor and a couple of Andy Warhols on the walls of their home were any pieces of African-American art or cultural items to educate the four Page children about their heritage. Eventually, the couple would visit antique stores and work with dealers to fill their home, and his Supreme Court chambers, with artifacts from slavery and the Jim Crow era.

“These items represent facts,” he said. “Not somebody’s opinion about what happened. Not somebody’s view about what did or didn’t occur, but actual facts. … They help me understand where we are today. The disparities in education, our criminal justice system. For me the message I get is that we haven’t come to grips with the discrimination that comes, that came with those facts. We haven’t addressed the present effects of that past history, the present effects of that past discrimination.”

Daughter Georgi Page-Smith took the lead in assembling the more than 100 items on display in the exhibit, which includes a “testification station,” made from her father’s stand-up desk from his chambers, where visitors are invited to write their impressions in a leather-bound book.

“We knew it would be very emotional,” she said. “So we wanted to create an area where people could just stop for a minute, and do a little processing, and then reflect back to us.”

As part of the exhibit, Alan Page will give a talk Wednesday called “TESTIFY: It’s Not About the Flag or the Anthem, It’s About Justice.” He said the controversy over players kneeling during the national anthem misses the point.

“That debate about the anthem and the flag is the reddest of red herrings. The point is that we have injustice. And the question is: what are we going to do about that? Protesting draws attention to that injustice, but it’s a tactic. It’s not a program to end injustice. And so one of the things I also hope to do is encourage those who would be inclined to protest to take the next step, and take some concrete actions beyond merely drawing attention to the problem, and being involved in steps to eliminate it.”

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RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Could General Electric Be Dropped From the Dow?

More from Julie Davis and Michael Shear of the NYT:

He said he would bring Republicans and Democrats together around a $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan to “give us the safe, fast, reliable and modern infrastructure our economy needs and our people deserve.”

Mr. Trump offered few details on his infrastructure proposal. A report by McKinsey & Company says that a comprehensive fix would cost $1.8 trillion, while the American Society of Civil Engineers put the price tag at $2 trillion.

All but $200 billion is supposed to come from private investors, but lawmakers are skeptical. Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas, told reporters, “You tell me how we pay for it, and I’ll tell you what we can do.”

“Leveraging private dollars is a good start,” he added, “but we got a lot of work to do.”

Don’t forget immigration

Congress has until Feb. 8 to agree on government funding, and Democrats say they still want a deal to protect the young immigrants known as Dreamers. The White House’s immigration proposal isn’t sitting well with them — nor with some House Republicans. Meanwhile, businesses are preparing for the worst if legal protections for the Dreamers expire in March.

The Washington flyaround

• As the national deficit approaches $1 trillion, both parties are expressing concern — while pushing to increase spending. (NYT)

• The Justice Department and the F.B.I. are bracing for the release of a secret memo alleging improprieties in the surveillance of a Trump campaign aide. (NYT)

• What companies are doing with their tax savings. (NYT)

• The head of the C.D.C., Brenda Fitzgerald, bought shares in Japan Tobacco despite leading an agency charged with reducing tobacco use. (Politico)

• Expect populist politics to stick around, Eduardo Porter writes in his latest Economic Scene column. (NYT)

• Todd Ricketts, the Chicago billionaire, will replace Steve Wynn as the Republican National Committee’s finance chairman. (WaPo)

• The Treasury Department’s list of Russian oligarchs was compiled primarily from Forbes’s list of global billionaires. (Forbes)

Boeing is powering the Dow again.

Shares of Boeing are up 6.3 percent after the company’s earnings easily beat expectations.

The aerospace company reported a profit of $3.06 a share excluding the tax gain. Analysts had expected $2.90 a share. Revenue jumped 8.9 percent to $25.4 billion. Analysts had forecast $24.7 billion in sales.

Boeing’s rally Wednesday has accounted for about 50 percent of the Dow Jones industrial average’s 250 point gain in early trading.

Boeing’s 12 percent rally over the past year has powered the Dow’s run to record highs. Earlier this month when the Dow surpassed 26000 just eight days after topping 25000, Boeing accounted for about a third of the index’s 1,000-point gain.

Photo

Credit Associated Press

Can Buffett, Bezos and Dimon transform health care?

Warren Buffett has called the U.S. health care system “a hungry tapeworm on the American economy” because of its ever-growing costs. So his Berkshire Hathaway has teamed up with Amazon and JPMorgan Chase to create a new — and as of now largely undefined — health care provider.

Our colleague Peter Eavis had four questions about the initiative:

• What is it, beyond the thin description of an independent company “free from profit-making incentives and constraints”?

• How big will it be?

• What expertise will these companies bring?

• How will this venture cut costs?

The numbers that matter

$18,764: the average premium for family coverage for employees nationwide, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

30 percent: the current amount of the premium paid for by workers.

5 percent and 7 percent: how much the shares of Anthem and Cigna fell yesterday. (Insurers and prescription benefits managers as a whole took a hit on the news.)

Critics’ corner

• Margot Sanger-Katz and Reed Abelson offer reasons to temper expectations. (Upshot)

• Robert Cyran writes, “Amazon is already perceived as a potential threat to many U.S. businesses. Add other big employers, and the threat is multiplied.” (Breakingviews)

Photo

Credit Thomas White/Reuters

Xerox’s deal is the end of an era

One of the icons of 20th-century corporate America, the long-struggling company will now be controlled by Fujifilm Holdings of Japan.

It’s a complicated transaction

• Xerox will be folded into an existing 55-year-old joint venture.

• Xerox investors will receive a special cash dividend of $9.80 a share and will own 49.9 percent of the combined business, which will be publicly traded.

• The move is expected to save at least $1.7 billion in costs, though Fujifilm will cut 10,000 jobs.

The context: Xerox has struggled over the years with a decline in corporate printing, and it spun out its business services unit last year. Two of its biggest investors, Carl Icahn and Darwin Deason, have pressured the company to explore a deal — including revising or ending the Fujifilm joint venture.

Behind the deal: Fujifilm relied on Mitsubishi UFJ, Morgan Stanley and the law firm Morrison & Foerster. (It is also borrowing from Citigroup and Morgan Stanley.) Xerox took advice from Centerview Partners and the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison.

Thomson Reuters is a huge post-crisis L.B.O.

Blackstone’s $20 billion deal (including debt) for control of the company’s financial and risk division highlights the growing ambitions of private equity firms — and how they need to spend nearly $1 trillion in uninvested capital.

Behind the deal

Blackstone believes that the financial and risk division, which includes Thomson Reuters’s Eikon terminal service, can continue to grow. “We are excited to partner with Thomson Reuters — one of the most trusted companies in financial technology,” Martin Brand of Blackstone said in a statement.

Meanwhile, Thomson Reuters gets a cash infusion as it competes against Bloomberg LP and tries to deal with customers spending less on financial data. Bloomberg pointed out that the company’s controlling Thomson family is essentially retreating to the news business.

Critics’ corner

• Gillian Tan writes, “Despite the $20 billion price tag, the deal seems like a bargain.” (Gadfly)

• Lex writes, “Any spinoff would put paid to the Thomson family’s decade-long hopes for combining a media business with financial services.” (Lex)

Photo

Credit Gene J. Puskar/Associated Press

The tech flyaround

• The trial in Waymo’s lawsuit accusing Uber of stealing its driverless car technology is set to start today. (NYT)

• The Justice Department and the S.E.C. are investigating whether Apple violated securities laws concerning its disclosures about a software update that slowed older iPhone models, according to unidentified sources. (Bloomberg)

• Google’s rivals have complained to European regulators that the search giant is still stymying competition in online shopping, despite an order to change its behavior. (WSJ)

• An app that inadvertently revealed the locations of military personnel is the latest sign that we need better control over our data, writes Zeynep Tufekci, a professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina. (NYT)

• SoftBank’s Vision Fund finally struck a deal to invest $300 million in Wag, the dog-walking start-up. (NYT)

Photo

Credit Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency

Bitcoin keeps on falling

January has been the worst month for the virtual currency in three years, with its price down 30 percent. And it’s because of the very thing that Bitcoin and other digital currencies were supposed to be free from: central authorities and regulators.

• The S.E.C. froze a $600 million initial coin offering yesterday run by AriseBank.

• China has continued to clamp down on Bitcoin mining.

• South Korea is still weighing legal checks on virtual currency trading.

Add in Facebook’s banning of ads for digital money, and mining or trading virtual currencies has become a lot harder.

But not everyone has gotten the memo: The Japanese messaging service Line has plans to open its own virtual currency exchange, while the embattled publisher of Penthouse magazine wants to promote its own adult-entertainment-focused token.

Photo

Credit Charles Krupa/Associated Press

Can Wynn’s board be trusted to investigate its chairman?

As Steve Wynn faces allegations of sexual assault and other misconduct, the board of his casino empire is increasingly coming under scrutiny, too.

The proxy adviser ISS has long criticized the compensation of Mr. Wynn over the years, going so far as to say that the company had an “overall corporate governance profile that ranks among the worst, not the best, of U.S. companies.”

The board said that it was setting up an independent committee to look into the allegations. It will be led by Patricia Mulroy, Wynn’s only female director and a former official at Nevada’s gaming commission.

Meanwhile, investigating Wynn are gaming regulators for Nevada, Massachusetts and Macau.

The misconduct flyaround

• Vice said that its chief digital officer, Mike Germano, would not return to the company after sexual harassment allegations against him prompted an internal investigation. (NYT)

• #MeToo has put pressure on companies, especially financial firms, to disclose information on their work force diversity. (Reuters)

• Hillary Clinton said that she should have fired a 2008 campaign aide after he was accused of sexual harassment. (Facebook)

Revolving door

• Och-Ziff Capital Management has named Rob Shafir, previously the head of Credit Suisse’s American operations, as the successor to Daniel Och, laying to rest questions about its leadership planning. (Och-Ziff)

The Speed Read

• Volkswagen suspended its chief lobbyist on Tuesday amid a growing furor over experiments on monkeys that were meant to promote the virtues of diesel-powered vehicles. (NYT)

• A California woman is suing Walmart, accusing it of racial discrimination because her local store keeps African-American personal care products locked up in a glass case. (NYT)

• David Cameron, the former British prime minister, has courted China’s sovereign wealth fund as a potential investor for his $1 trillion infrastructure fund. (FT)

• Carlos Slim is increasingly at odds with his onetime mentee, AT&T C.E.O. Randall Stephenson. (WSJ)

• Exxon Mobil said that it would triple its oil and gas production in the Permian Basin, which straddles West Texas and New Mexico. (NYT)

• ISS has become the kingmaker in proxy contests between hedge fund activists and their multibillion-dollar prey — an astonishing fact given that ISS is worth less than $1 billion and that it started out as a back-office support system. (Institutional Investor)

• Lex examines whether share buybacks undermine companies’ financial health, juice bonuses and threaten the real economy. (FT)

Want this in your own email inbox? Here’s the sign-up.

You can find live updates throughout the day at nytimes.com/dealbook.

We’d love your feedback. Please email thoughts and suggestions to bizday@nytimes.com.

Continue reading the main story

DealBook Briefing: Could General Electric Be Dropped From the Dow?

More from Julie Davis and Michael Shear of the NYT:

He said he would bring Republicans and Democrats together around a $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan to “give us the safe, fast, reliable and modern infrastructure our economy needs and our people deserve.”

Mr. Trump offered few details on his infrastructure proposal. A report by McKinsey & Company says that a comprehensive fix would cost $1.8 trillion, while the American Society of Civil Engineers put the price tag at $2 trillion.

All but $200 billion is supposed to come from private investors, but lawmakers are skeptical. Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas, told reporters, “You tell me how we pay for it, and I’ll tell you what we can do.”

“Leveraging private dollars is a good start,” he added, “but we got a lot of work to do.”

Don’t forget immigration

Congress has until Feb. 8 to agree on government funding, and Democrats say they still want a deal to protect the young immigrants known as Dreamers. The White House’s immigration proposal isn’t sitting well with them — nor with some House Republicans. Meanwhile, businesses are preparing for the worst if legal protections for the Dreamers expire in March.

The Washington flyaround

• As the national deficit approaches $1 trillion, both parties are expressing concern — while pushing to increase spending. (NYT)

• The Justice Department and the F.B.I. are bracing for the release of a secret memo alleging improprieties in the surveillance of a Trump campaign aide. (NYT)

• What companies are doing with their tax savings. (NYT)

• The head of the C.D.C., Brenda Fitzgerald, bought shares in Japan Tobacco despite leading an agency charged with reducing tobacco use. (Politico)

• Expect populist politics to stick around, Eduardo Porter writes in his latest Economic Scene column. (NYT)

• Todd Ricketts, the Chicago billionaire, will replace Steve Wynn as the Republican National Committee’s finance chairman. (WaPo)

• The Treasury Department’s list of Russian oligarchs was compiled primarily from Forbes’s list of global billionaires. (Forbes)

Boeing is powering the Dow again.

Shares of Boeing are up 6.3 percent after the company’s earnings easily beat expectations.

The aerospace company reported a profit of $3.06 a share excluding the tax gain. Analysts had expected $2.90 a share. Revenue jumped 8.9 percent to $25.4 billion. Analysts had forecast $24.7 billion in sales.

Boeing’s rally Wednesday has accounted for about 50 percent of the Dow Jones industrial average’s 250 point gain in early trading.

Boeing’s 12 percent rally over the past year has powered the Dow’s run to record highs. Earlier this month when the Dow surpassed 26000 just eight days after topping 25000, Boeing accounted for about a third of the index’s 1,000-point gain.

Photo

Credit Associated Press

Can Buffett, Bezos and Dimon transform health care?

Warren Buffett has called the U.S. health care system “a hungry tapeworm on the American economy” because of its ever-growing costs. So his Berkshire Hathaway has teamed up with Amazon and JPMorgan Chase to create a new — and as of now largely undefined — health care provider.

Our colleague Peter Eavis had four questions about the initiative:

• What is it, beyond the thin description of an independent company “free from profit-making incentives and constraints”?

• How big will it be?

• What expertise will these companies bring?

• How will this venture cut costs?

The numbers that matter

$18,764: the average premium for family coverage for employees nationwide, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

30 percent: the current amount of the premium paid for by workers.

5 percent and 7 percent: how much the shares of Anthem and Cigna fell yesterday. (Insurers and prescription benefits managers as a whole took a hit on the news.)

Critics’ corner

• Margot Sanger-Katz and Reed Abelson offer reasons to temper expectations. (Upshot)

• Robert Cyran writes, “Amazon is already perceived as a potential threat to many U.S. businesses. Add other big employers, and the threat is multiplied.” (Breakingviews)

Photo

Credit Thomas White/Reuters

Xerox’s deal is the end of an era

One of the icons of 20th-century corporate America, the long-struggling company will now be controlled by Fujifilm Holdings of Japan.

It’s a complicated transaction

• Xerox will be folded into an existing 55-year-old joint venture.

• Xerox investors will receive a special cash dividend of $9.80 a share and will own 49.9 percent of the combined business, which will be publicly traded.

• The move is expected to save at least $1.7 billion in costs, though Fujifilm will cut 10,000 jobs.

The context: Xerox has struggled over the years with a decline in corporate printing, and it spun out its business services unit last year. Two of its biggest investors, Carl Icahn and Darwin Deason, have pressured the company to explore a deal — including revising or ending the Fujifilm joint venture.

Behind the deal: Fujifilm relied on Mitsubishi UFJ, Morgan Stanley and the law firm Morrison & Foerster. (It is also borrowing from Citigroup and Morgan Stanley.) Xerox took advice from Centerview Partners and the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison.

Thomson Reuters is a huge post-crisis L.B.O.

Blackstone’s $20 billion deal (including debt) for control of the company’s financial and risk division highlights the growing ambitions of private equity firms — and how they need to spend nearly $1 trillion in uninvested capital.

Behind the deal

Blackstone believes that the financial and risk division, which includes Thomson Reuters’s Eikon terminal service, can continue to grow. “We are excited to partner with Thomson Reuters — one of the most trusted companies in financial technology,” Martin Brand of Blackstone said in a statement.

Meanwhile, Thomson Reuters gets a cash infusion as it competes against Bloomberg LP and tries to deal with customers spending less on financial data. Bloomberg pointed out that the company’s controlling Thomson family is essentially retreating to the news business.

Critics’ corner

• Gillian Tan writes, “Despite the $20 billion price tag, the deal seems like a bargain.” (Gadfly)

• Lex writes, “Any spinoff would put paid to the Thomson family’s decade-long hopes for combining a media business with financial services.” (Lex)

Photo

Credit Gene J. Puskar/Associated Press

The tech flyaround

• The trial in Waymo’s lawsuit accusing Uber of stealing its driverless car technology is set to start today. (NYT)

• The Justice Department and the S.E.C. are investigating whether Apple violated securities laws concerning its disclosures about a software update that slowed older iPhone models, according to unidentified sources. (Bloomberg)

• Google’s rivals have complained to European regulators that the search giant is still stymying competition in online shopping, despite an order to change its behavior. (WSJ)

• An app that inadvertently revealed the locations of military personnel is the latest sign that we need better control over our data, writes Zeynep Tufekci, a professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina. (NYT)

• SoftBank’s Vision Fund finally struck a deal to invest $300 million in Wag, the dog-walking start-up. (NYT)

Photo

Credit Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency

Bitcoin keeps on falling

January has been the worst month for the virtual currency in three years, with its price down 30 percent. And it’s because of the very thing that Bitcoin and other digital currencies were supposed to be free from: central authorities and regulators.

• The S.E.C. froze a $600 million initial coin offering yesterday run by AriseBank.

• China has continued to clamp down on Bitcoin mining.

• South Korea is still weighing legal checks on virtual currency trading.

Add in Facebook’s banning of ads for digital money, and mining or trading virtual currencies has become a lot harder.

But not everyone has gotten the memo: The Japanese messaging service Line has plans to open its own virtual currency exchange, while the embattled publisher of Penthouse magazine wants to promote its own adult-entertainment-focused token.

Photo

Credit Charles Krupa/Associated Press

Can Wynn’s board be trusted to investigate its chairman?

As Steve Wynn faces allegations of sexual assault and other misconduct, the board of his casino empire is increasingly coming under scrutiny, too.

The proxy adviser ISS has long criticized the compensation of Mr. Wynn over the years, going so far as to say that the company had an “overall corporate governance profile that ranks among the worst, not the best, of U.S. companies.”

The board said that it was setting up an independent committee to look into the allegations. It will be led by Patricia Mulroy, Wynn’s only female director and a former official at Nevada’s gaming commission.

Meanwhile, investigating Wynn are gaming regulators for Nevada, Massachusetts and Macau.

The misconduct flyaround

• Vice said that its chief digital officer, Mike Germano, would not return to the company after sexual harassment allegations against him prompted an internal investigation. (NYT)

• #MeToo has put pressure on companies, especially financial firms, to disclose information on their work force diversity. (Reuters)

• Hillary Clinton said that she should have fired a 2008 campaign aide after he was accused of sexual harassment. (Facebook)

Revolving door

• Och-Ziff Capital Management has named Rob Shafir, previously the head of Credit Suisse’s American operations, as the successor to Daniel Och, laying to rest questions about its leadership planning. (Och-Ziff)

The Speed Read

• Volkswagen suspended its chief lobbyist on Tuesday amid a growing furor over experiments on monkeys that were meant to promote the virtues of diesel-powered vehicles. (NYT)

• A California woman is suing Walmart, accusing it of racial discrimination because her local store keeps African-American personal care products locked up in a glass case. (NYT)

• David Cameron, the former British prime minister, has courted China’s sovereign wealth fund as a potential investor for his $1 trillion infrastructure fund. (FT)

• Carlos Slim is increasingly at odds with his onetime mentee, AT&T C.E.O. Randall Stephenson. (WSJ)

• Exxon Mobil said that it would triple its oil and gas production in the Permian Basin, which straddles West Texas and New Mexico. (NYT)

• ISS has become the kingmaker in proxy contests between hedge fund activists and their multibillion-dollar prey — an astonishing fact given that ISS is worth less than $1 billion and that it started out as a back-office support system. (Institutional Investor)

• Lex examines whether share buybacks undermine companies’ financial health, juice bonuses and threaten the real economy. (FT)

Want this in your own email inbox? Here’s the sign-up.

You can find live updates throughout the day at nytimes.com/dealbook.

We’d love your feedback. Please email thoughts and suggestions to bizday@nytimes.com.

Continue reading the main story

Trump Rides Economic Momentum from Obama

President Donald J. Trump addresses the World Economic Forum at the World Economic Forum Conference Center, Friday, January 26, 2018, in Davos, Switzerland. PHOTO: Shealah Craighead/White House

By Jesse Jackson

(Trice Edney Wire) – As he delivers his first State of the Union address, President Donald Trump is looking for approval. He’ll brag on the economy with a likely focus on his Twitter claim that “because of my policies,” Black unemployment is at its “lowest rate ever recorded.”

He made that claim while responding to Jay-Z’s criticisms and also has declared to African-Americans that “Dems did nothing for you but get your vote.”

Trump is like a man who jumps on a moving train and takes credit for its speed. He claims he inherited a “mess” and transformed it. In fact, Obama inherited the mess — an economy in free fall, losing 700,000 jobs a month. He turned it around. Trump inherited an economy enjoying a record stretch of months with private sector jobs growth.

Black unemployment fell under Obama. In fact, Trump created slightly fewer new jobs in his first year than Obama did in his last. Trump is riding the economic momentum created under Obama. His policies haven’t really taken hold yet. He’s not passed a budget. His posturing on trade hasn’t resulted in new policies yet or reduced our trade deficits.

In touting the unemployment figure, Trump also simply ignores the stark reality facing many African-Americans — and other working people. Too many are working without a living wage, without affordable health care, without affordable mass transit, without overtime, paid vacations, paid family leave and more.

Black unemployment remains virtually twice that of White unemployment — and the headline unemployment figure doesn’t count those who have given up looking for jobs, those who can only find part-time work, those whose wages can’t support a family. In Chicago and other cities, there are neighborhoods with unemployment at 20 percent, poverty at 40 percent and conditions far worse for young African-American men.

That hasn’t changed under Trump. What African-Americans see is a president who is rousing racial divisions, fears and hatreds, from Charlottesville, Virginia, to the slurring of Obama to the insult on Haiti and s—hole countries to the demonizing of immigrants, particularly people of color. What we see is an administration that is systematically rolling back civil rights protections.

It has decimated civil rights offices in the Department of Education, the Department of Labor and elsewhere. The Department of Justice has reversed position on voting rights cases, standing with those in Texas and elsewhere who would suppress the vote.

It has virtually abandoned consent decrees in civil rights cases, weakening its ability to enforce remedies to violations. Trump is packing the courts with right-wing justices who stand with corporations and against the rights of minorities and women. We see an administration that has systematically favored the rich and the corporations over working and poor people. It opposes lifting the minimum wage.

It has slashed enforcement of worker rights, worker safety laws and prosecution of wage theft. It has reversed a long overdue expansion of overtime rights, costing working people literally billions in overtime pay. Most recently, it has proposed allowing restaurant and hotel owners to take over the allocation of tips, a change that would cost some of the lowest paid workers earnings they need to survive.

We see an administration that seeks to slash virtually every program that supports the vulnerable — of all colors and races. Its efforts to repeal Obamacare, rollback Medicaid, cut investment in schools, Pell grants, student loans, training, low-cost housing and more will disproportionately hit people of color. We see an administration that has pushed to expand mass incarceration, instructing prosecutors to seek maximum sentences, ending efforts to reform racist police practices. Trump inherited a justice system that systematically discriminates against people of color. He and his Justice Department will make it worse.

Trump’s long promised and yet unseen plan to rebuild America’s infrastructure offers a true opportunity for good jobs. A major effort will be made to have any legislation that emerges target areas of high unemployment — both rural and urban — and include sums for training so that those left out of the economy can find their way in. By all accounts, Trump wants to spend less and offer private investors big returns. Will he therefore oppose efforts to make the rebuilding inclusive? We shall see. In his presidential campaign, Trump called on African Americans to vote for him, arguing, “What have you got to lose?”

But African-American voters saw someone who had risen by peddling the racist slur about Obama not being American, someone who had profited by peddling division and appealing to fears. They are looking for someone who will help them get an equal shot and move to provide equal justice under the law.

Real full employment helps, because African-Americans are too often the last hired. But there was full employment under slavery. Working Americans — Black, White and brown, of all races and creeds — are looking for a champion. Sorry, Mr. Trump, taking credit for growth that you did not create won’t get it done.

Trump’s Big Promise on Infrastructure

All but $200 billion is supposed to come from private investors, but lawmakers are skeptical. Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas, told reporters, “You tell me how we pay for it, and I’ll tell you what we can do.”

“Leveraging private dollars is a good start,” he added, “but we got a lot of work to do.”

Don’t forget immigration

Congress has until Feb. 8 to agree on government funding, and Democrats say they still want a deal to protect the young immigrants known as Dreamers. The White House’s immigration proposal isn’t sitting well with them — nor with some House Republicans. Meanwhile, businesses are preparing for the worst if legal protections for the Dreamers expire in March.

The Washington flyaround

• As the national deficit approaches $1 trillion, both parties are expressing concern — while pushing to increase spending. (NYT)

• The Justice Department and the F.B.I. are bracing for the release of a secret memo alleging improprieties in the surveillance of a Trump campaign aide. (NYT)

• What companies are doing with their tax savings. (NYT)

• The head of the C.D.C., Brenda Fitzgerald, bought shares in Japan Tobacco despite leading an agency charged with reducing tobacco use. (Politico)

• Expect populist politics to stick around, Eduardo Porter writes in his latest Economic Scene column. (NYT)

• Todd Ricketts, the Chicago billionaire, will replace Steve Wynn as the Republican National Committee’s finance chairman. (WaPo)

• The Treasury Department’s list of Russian oligarchs was compiled primarily from Forbes’s list of global billionaires. (Forbes)

Boeing is powering the Dow again.

Shares of Boeing are up 6.3 percent after the company’s earnings easily beat expectations.

The aerospace company reported a profit of $3.06 a share excluding the tax gain. Analysts had expected $2.90 a share. Revenue jumped 8.9 percent to $25.4 billion. Analysts had forecast $24.7 billion in sales.

Boeing’s rally Wednesday has accounted for about 50 percent of the Dow Jones industrial average’s 250 point gain in early trading.

The Boeing’s 12 percent rally over the past year has powered the Dow’s run to record highs. Earlier this month when the Dow surpassed 26000 just eight days after topping 25000, Boeing accounted for about a third of the index’s 1,000-point gain.

Photo

Credit Associated Press

Can Buffett, Bezos and Dimon transform health care?

Warren Buffett has called the U.S. health care system “a hungry tapeworm on the American economy” because of its ever-growing costs. So his Berkshire Hathaway has teamed up with Amazon and JPMorgan Chase to create a new — and as of now largely undefined — health care provider.

Our colleague Peter Eavis had four questions about the initiative:

• What is it, beyond the thin description of an independent company “free from profit-making incentives and constraints”?

• How big will it be?

• What expertise will these companies bring?

• How will this venture cut costs?

The numbers that matter

$18,764: the average premium for family coverage for employees nationwide, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

30 percent: the current amount of the premium paid for by workers.

5 percent and 7 percent: how much the shares of Anthem and Cigna fell yesterday. (Insurers and prescription benefits managers as a whole took a hit on the news.)

Critics’ corner

• Margot Sanger-Katz and Reed Abelson offer reasons to temper expectations. (Upshot)

• Robert Cyran writes, “Amazon is already perceived as a potential threat to many U.S. businesses. Add other big employers, and the threat is multiplied.” (Breakingviews)

Photo

Credit Thomas White/Reuters

Xerox’s deal is the end of an era

One of the icons of 20th-century corporate America, the long-struggling company will now be controlled by Fujifilm Holdings of Japan.

It’s a complicated transaction

• Xerox will be folded into an existing 55-year-old joint venture.

• Xerox investors will receive a special cash dividend of $9.80 a share and will own 49.9 percent of the combined business, which will be publicly traded.

• The move is expected to save at least $1.7 billion in costs, though Fujifilm will cut 10,000 jobs.

The context: Xerox has struggled over the years with a decline in corporate printing, and it spun out its business services unit last year. Two of its biggest investors, Carl Icahn and Darwin Deason, have pressured the company to explore a deal — including revising or ending the Fujifilm joint venture.

Behind the deal: Fujifilm relied on Mitsubishi UFJ, Morgan Stanley and the law firm Morrison & Foerster. (It is also borrowing from Citigroup and Morgan Stanley.) Xerox took advice from Centerview Partners and the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison.

Thomson Reuters is a huge post-crisis L.B.O.

Blackstone’s $20 billion deal (including debt) for control of the company’s financial and risk division highlights the growing ambitions of private equity firms — and how they need to spend nearly $1 trillion in uninvested capital.

Behind the deal

Blackstone believes that the financial and risk division, which includes Thomson Reuters’s Eikon terminal service, can continue to grow. “We are excited to partner with Thomson Reuters — one of the most trusted companies in financial technology,” Martin Brand of Blackstone said in a statement.

Meanwhile, Thomson Reuters gets a cash infusion as it competes against Bloomberg LP and tries to deal with customers spending less on financial data. Bloomberg pointed out that the company’s controlling Thomson family is essentially retreating to the news business.

Critics’ corner

• Gillian Tan writes, “Despite the $20 billion price tag, the deal seems like a bargain.” (Gadfly)

• Lex writes, “Any spinoff would put paid to the Thomson family’s decade-long hopes for combining a media business with financial services.” (Lex)

Photo

Credit Gene J. Puskar/Associated Press

The tech flyaround

• The trial in Waymo’s lawsuit accusing Uber of stealing its driverless car technology is set to start today. (NYT)

• The Justice Department and the S.E.C. are investigating whether Apple violated securities laws concerning its disclosures about a software update that slowed older iPhone models, according to unidentified sources. (Bloomberg)

• Google’s rivals have complained to European regulators that the search giant is still stymying competition in online shopping, despite an order to change its behavior. (WSJ)

• An app that inadvertently revealed the locations of military personnel is the latest sign that we need better control over our data, writes Zeynep Tufekci, a professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina. (NYT)

• SoftBank’s Vision Fund finally struck a deal to invest $300 million in Wag, the dog-walking start-up. (NYT)

Photo

Credit Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency

Bitcoin keeps on falling

January has been the worst month for the virtual currency in three years, with its price down 30 percent. And it’s because of the very thing that Bitcoin and other digital currencies were supposed to be free from: central authorities and regulators.

• The S.E.C. froze a $600 million initial coin offering yesterday run by AriseBank.

• China has continued to clamp down on Bitcoin mining.

• South Korea is still weighing legal checks on virtual currency trading.

Add in Facebook’s banning of ads for digital money, and mining or trading virtual currencies has become a lot harder.

But not everyone has gotten the memo: The Japanese messaging service Line has plans to open its own virtual currency exchange, while the embattled publisher of Penthouse magazine wants to promote its own adult-entertainment-focused token.

Photo

Credit Charles Krupa/Associated Press

Can Wynn’s board be trusted to investigate its chairman?

As Steve Wynn faces allegations of sexual assault and other misconduct, the board of his casino empire is increasingly coming under scrutiny, too.

The proxy adviser ISS has long criticized the compensation of Mr. Wynn over the years, going so far as to say that the company had an “overall corporate governance profile that ranks among the worst, not the best, of U.S. companies.”

The board said that it was setting up an independent committee to look into the allegations. It will be led by Patricia Mulroy, Wynn’s only female director and a former official at Nevada’s gaming commission.

Meanwhile, investigating Wynn are gaming regulators for Nevada, Massachusetts and Macau.

The misconduct flyaround

• Vice said that its chief digital officer, Mike Germano, would not return to the company after sexual harassment allegations against him prompted an internal investigation. (NYT)

• #MeToo has put pressure on companies, especially financial firms, to disclose information on their work force diversity. (Reuters)

• Hillary Clinton said that she should have fired a 2008 campaign aide after he was accused of sexual harassment. (Facebook)

Revolving door

• Och-Ziff Capital Management has named Rob Shafir, previously the head of Credit Suisse’s American operations, as the successor to Daniel Och, laying to rest questions about its leadership planning. (Och-Ziff)

The Speed Read

• Volkswagen suspended its chief lobbyist on Tuesday amid a growing furor over experiments on monkeys that were meant to promote the virtues of diesel-powered vehicles. (NYT)

• A California woman is suing Walmart, accusing it of racial discrimination because her local store keeps African-American personal care products locked up in a glass case. (NYT)

• David Cameron, the former British prime minister, has courted China’s sovereign wealth fund as a potential investor for his $1 trillion infrastructure fund. (FT)

• Carlos Slim is increasingly at odds with his onetime mentee, AT&T C.E.O. Randall Stephenson. (WSJ)

• Exxon Mobil said that it would triple its oil and gas production in the Permian Basin, which straddles West Texas and New Mexico. (NYT)

• ISS has become the kingmaker in proxy contests between hedge fund activists and their multibillion-dollar prey — an astonishing fact given that ISS is worth less than $1 billion and that it started out as a back-office support system. (Institutional Investor)

• Lex examines whether share buybacks undermine companies’ financial health, juice bonuses and threaten the real economy. (FT)

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You can find live updates throughout the day at nytimes.com/dealbook.

We’d love your feedback. Please email thoughts and suggestions to bizday@nytimes.com.

Continue reading the main story

DealBook Briefing: Trump’s Big Promise on Infrastructure

All but $200 billion is supposed to come from private investors, but lawmakers are skeptical. Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas, told reporters, “You tell me how we pay for it, and I’ll tell you what we can do.”

“Leveraging private dollars is a good start,” he added, “but we got a lot of work to do.”

Don’t forget immigration

Congress has until Feb. 8 to agree on government funding, and Democrats say they still want a deal to protect the young immigrants known as Dreamers. The White House’s immigration proposal isn’t sitting well with them — nor with some House Republicans. Meanwhile, businesses are preparing for the worst if legal protections for the Dreamers expire in March.

The Washington flyaround

• As the national deficit approaches $1 trillion, both parties are expressing concern — while pushing to increase spending. (NYT)

• The Justice Department and the F.B.I. are bracing for the release of a secret memo alleging improprieties in the surveillance of a Trump campaign aide. (NYT)

• What companies are doing with their tax savings. (NYT)

• The head of the C.D.C., Brenda Fitzgerald, bought shares in Japan Tobacco despite leading an agency charged with reducing tobacco use. (Politico)

• Expect populist politics to stick around, Eduardo Porter writes in his latest Economic Scene column. (NYT)

• Todd Ricketts, the Chicago billionaire, will replace Steve Wynn as the Republican National Committee’s finance chairman. (WaPo)

• The Treasury Department’s list of Russian oligarchs was compiled primarily from Forbes’s list of global billionaires. (Forbes)

Boeing is powering the Dow again.

Shares of Boeing are up 6.3 percent after the company’s earnings easily beat expectations.

The aerospace company reported a profit of $3.06 a share excluding the tax gain. Analysts had expected $2.90 a share. Revenue jumped 8.9 percent to $25.4 billion. Analysts had forecast $24.7 billion in sales.

Boeing’s rally Wednesday has accounted for about 50 percent of the Dow Jones industrial average’s 250 point gain in early trading.

The Boeing’s 12 percent rally over the past year has powered the Dow’s run to record highs. Earlier this month when the Dow surpassed 26000 just eight days after topping 25000, Boeing accounted for about a third of the index’s 1,000-point gain.

Photo

Credit Associated Press

Can Buffett, Bezos and Dimon transform health care?

Warren Buffett has called the U.S. health care system “a hungry tapeworm on the American economy” because of its ever-growing costs. So his Berkshire Hathaway has teamed up with Amazon and JPMorgan Chase to create a new — and as of now largely undefined — health care provider.

Our colleague Peter Eavis had four questions about the initiative:

• What is it, beyond the thin description of an independent company “free from profit-making incentives and constraints”?

• How big will it be?

• What expertise will these companies bring?

• How will this venture cut costs?

The numbers that matter

$18,764: the average premium for family coverage for employees nationwide, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

30 percent: the current amount of the premium paid for by workers.

5 percent and 7 percent: how much the shares of Anthem and Cigna fell yesterday. (Insurers and prescription benefits managers as a whole took a hit on the news.)

Critics’ corner

• Margot Sanger-Katz and Reed Abelson offer reasons to temper expectations. (Upshot)

• Robert Cyran writes, “Amazon is already perceived as a potential threat to many U.S. businesses. Add other big employers, and the threat is multiplied.” (Breakingviews)

Photo

Credit Thomas White/Reuters

Xerox’s deal is the end of an era

One of the icons of 20th-century corporate America, the long-struggling company will now be controlled by Fujifilm Holdings of Japan.

It’s a complicated transaction

• Xerox will be folded into an existing 55-year-old joint venture.

• Xerox investors will receive a special cash dividend of $9.80 a share and will own 49.9 percent of the combined business, which will be publicly traded.

• The move is expected to save at least $1.7 billion in costs, though Fujifilm will cut 10,000 jobs.

The context: Xerox has struggled over the years with a decline in corporate printing, and it spun out its business services unit last year. Two of its biggest investors, Carl Icahn and Darwin Deason, have pressured the company to explore a deal — including revising or ending the Fujifilm joint venture.

Behind the deal: Fujifilm relied on Mitsubishi UFJ, Morgan Stanley and the law firm Morrison & Foerster. (It is also borrowing from Citigroup and Morgan Stanley.) Xerox took advice from Centerview Partners and the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison.

Thomson Reuters is a huge post-crisis L.B.O.

Blackstone’s $20 billion deal (including debt) for control of the company’s financial and risk division highlights the growing ambitions of private equity firms — and how they need to spend nearly $1 trillion in uninvested capital.

Behind the deal

Blackstone believes that the financial and risk division, which includes Thomson Reuters’s Eikon terminal service, can continue to grow. “We are excited to partner with Thomson Reuters — one of the most trusted companies in financial technology,” Martin Brand of Blackstone said in a statement.

Meanwhile, Thomson Reuters gets a cash infusion as it competes against Bloomberg LP and tries to deal with customers spending less on financial data. Bloomberg pointed out that the company’s controlling Thomson family is essentially retreating to the news business.

Critics’ corner

• Gillian Tan writes, “Despite the $20 billion price tag, the deal seems like a bargain.” (Gadfly)

• Lex writes, “Any spinoff would put paid to the Thomson family’s decade-long hopes for combining a media business with financial services.” (Lex)

Photo

Credit Gene J. Puskar/Associated Press

The tech flyaround

• The trial in Waymo’s lawsuit accusing Uber of stealing its driverless car technology is set to start today. (NYT)

• The Justice Department and the S.E.C. are investigating whether Apple violated securities laws concerning its disclosures about a software update that slowed older iPhone models, according to unidentified sources. (Bloomberg)

• Google’s rivals have complained to European regulators that the search giant is still stymying competition in online shopping, despite an order to change its behavior. (WSJ)

• An app that inadvertently revealed the locations of military personnel is the latest sign that we need better control over our data, writes Zeynep Tufekci, a professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina. (NYT)

• SoftBank’s Vision Fund finally struck a deal to invest $300 million in Wag, the dog-walking start-up. (NYT)

Photo

Credit Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency

Bitcoin keeps on falling

January has been the worst month for the virtual currency in three years, with its price down 30 percent. And it’s because of the very thing that Bitcoin and other digital currencies were supposed to be free from: central authorities and regulators.

• The S.E.C. froze a $600 million initial coin offering yesterday run by AriseBank.

• China has continued to clamp down on Bitcoin mining.

• South Korea is still weighing legal checks on virtual currency trading.

Add in Facebook’s banning of ads for digital money, and mining or trading virtual currencies has become a lot harder.

But not everyone has gotten the memo: The Japanese messaging service Line has plans to open its own virtual currency exchange, while the embattled publisher of Penthouse magazine wants to promote its own adult-entertainment-focused token.

Photo

Credit Charles Krupa/Associated Press

Can Wynn’s board be trusted to investigate its chairman?

As Steve Wynn faces allegations of sexual assault and other misconduct, the board of his casino empire is increasingly coming under scrutiny, too.

The proxy adviser ISS has long criticized the compensation of Mr. Wynn over the years, going so far as to say that the company had an “overall corporate governance profile that ranks among the worst, not the best, of U.S. companies.”

The board said that it was setting up an independent committee to look into the allegations. It will be led by Patricia Mulroy, Wynn’s only female director and a former official at Nevada’s gaming commission.

Meanwhile, investigating Wynn are gaming regulators for Nevada, Massachusetts and Macau.

The misconduct flyaround

• Vice said that its chief digital officer, Mike Germano, would not return to the company after sexual harassment allegations against him prompted an internal investigation. (NYT)

• #MeToo has put pressure on companies, especially financial firms, to disclose information on their work force diversity. (Reuters)

• Hillary Clinton said that she should have fired a 2008 campaign aide after he was accused of sexual harassment. (Facebook)

Revolving door

• Och-Ziff Capital Management has named Rob Shafir, previously the head of Credit Suisse’s American operations, as the successor to Daniel Och, laying to rest questions about its leadership planning. (Och-Ziff)

The Speed Read

• Volkswagen suspended its chief lobbyist on Tuesday amid a growing furor over experiments on monkeys that were meant to promote the virtues of diesel-powered vehicles. (NYT)

• A California woman is suing Walmart, accusing it of racial discrimination because her local store keeps African-American personal care products locked up in a glass case. (NYT)

• David Cameron, the former British prime minister, has courted China’s sovereign wealth fund as a potential investor for his $1 trillion infrastructure fund. (FT)

• Carlos Slim is increasingly at odds with his onetime mentee, AT&T C.E.O. Randall Stephenson. (WSJ)

• Exxon Mobil said that it would triple its oil and gas production in the Permian Basin, which straddles West Texas and New Mexico. (NYT)

• ISS has become the kingmaker in proxy contests between hedge fund activists and their multibillion-dollar prey — an astonishing fact given that ISS is worth less than $1 billion and that it started out as a back-office support system. (Institutional Investor)

• Lex examines whether share buybacks undermine companies’ financial health, juice bonuses and threaten the real economy. (FT)

Want this in your own email inbox? Here’s the sign-up.

You can find live updates throughout the day at nytimes.com/dealbook.

We’d love your feedback. Please email thoughts and suggestions to bizday@nytimes.com.

Continue reading the main story

Move On From Your Life Transition in a Unique Stylish Way with “The Beverly Hills Eulogy”

The Beverly Hills Eulogy arranges private elegant Eulogy Parties in clients’ homes to celebrate life transitions in a fun but healing way.

A Eulogy, also known as Eulogium, is a ritual that has been used throughout history; most often for closure from the loss of a person through death.”

— Annette Marie Westwood

BEVERLY HILLS, CA, U.S.A., January 30, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ — For those experiencing a transition in life, The Beverly Hills Eulogy offers a unique solution to help let go of the past. Clients can celebrate in the privacy of their own home with a stylish, boutique-style Eulogy Party, designed to help bring about closure in a healing, fun and often humorous way.

Founded by the only Transformational Eulogy Specialist in the world and author, Annette Marie Westwood, The Beverly Hills Eulogy is the only service of its kind in existence. Her luxury service also offers professional Life, Divorce or Dating Coaching, along with top-of-the-line Fitness Training, Makeovers, and Stylists.

“The Eulogy Party is intended to help mourn and release the ending of something, and then celebrate what a strong fabulous Flower you are for surviving,” says Westwood. “But far from being a solemn affair, we strive to make it unique, luxurious, and a lot of fun!”
The business is currently much in demand, not surprisingly since Westwood and her team are willing to travel anywhere in the U.S. to provide their services. Eulogy Parties for deceased pets are a popular choice right now, especially in Beverly Hills; however the pet owner must be ready to show they are emotionally ready to move on by having a new pet to introduce at the Eulogy.

“A Eulogy, also known as Eulogium, is a ritual that has been used throughout history; most often for closure from the loss of a person through death,” Westwood explains. “A Eulogy is a speech in high praise of person; we keep that tradition at The Beverly Hills Eulogy. Guests dress in mourning black and bring a gift. And the clients can perform the Eulogy through speech, dance, song, or whatever their talent is. Every Eulogy Party is completely unique, depending on the client’s wishes.”

Westwood has had numerous offers from major production companies to create a reality TV show about her business, which she says might be something to consider in the future. She is also the author of two books relevant to her business: Goodbye to You, and Don’t Go In That Room! Both books are on the topic of dating and divorce.

“I compare dating to horror films in my book “Don’t Go In That Room!” since so many people are having such an awful time dating and everyone is looking for the (BBD) Bigger Better Deal,” she jokes.

In her book, “Goodbye to You: A Girlfriend’s Guide to Wake You Up Before You Go Go Through Divorce,” she uses 80s music analogies to get the reader through divorce with humor, using references to songs that have captured every possible aspect of love.
“From the sad songs that will make you cry, to the ones that will have you dancin’ in the streets, music is some of the best therapy there is.”

Westwood is currently writing her third book about Pet Loss for her clients that have experienced the death of a pet:

“Pet Loss can be more painful than other life transitions because pets love us unconditionally,” she explains. “Unlike most of our friends and family, they are always there for us when we need them.”

About the company:

The Beverly Hills Eulogy organizes private luxury Eulogy Parties in the comfort of clients’ own homes for divorce, breakups, pet loss or other important life transitions. The company offers its services anywhere across the U.S., but only takes on a limited number of exclusive clients in order to ensure their service is of the highest possible standard.

For more information about The Beverly Hills Eulogy, visit the website at http://www.thebeverlyhillseulogy.com

Annette Marie Westwood
The Beverly Hills Eulogy
(323) 452-9771
email us here

Trump attempted a bipartisan State of the Union but didn’t even really look at the Democrats

U.S. President Donald Trump delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. January 30, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts U.S. President Donald Trump delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington Thomson Reuters

  • President Donald Trump said he wanted a bipartisan State of the Union, but he spent most of the speech facing Republicans.
  • Democrats booed Trump at one point over immigration, and they had invited 20 Dreamers, or people who were brought to the country illegaly as children.
  • But the Republicans had his back, standing more than 70 times to applaud.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump said in his speech to Congress on Tuesday that he wanted to extend an “open hand” to work with both parties on issues like immigration but he spent most of the address facing Republicans while seldom glancing at Democrats.

In the House of Representatives chamber where Trump delivered his first “State of the Union” speech, Republicans, who sat to Trump’s left, showed their enthusiasm as he touted tax cuts and boasted of the economy’s performance.

From the Republican side of the room, Trump received around 70 standing ovations.

But Democrats, who sat to Trump’s right, were mostly silent. Many wore black, an expression of solidarity with victims of sexual misconduct that added to the funereal mood on their side of the room.

With the mood on the Democratic side of the chamber downbeat from the first few moments of the speech, Trump pivoted to face his fellow Republicans and for the most directed his focus toward them.

Just as the American people are deeply divided, as evidenced by the 2016 presidential election, so was the Congress on Tuesday night on issues like taxes, health care and race.

“Unctuous platitudes,” Democratic Representative Nita Lowey said of Trump’s speech shortly after he left the chamber.

Democrats booed and hissed as Trump vowed to limit the ability of immigrants to sponsor their parents and siblings to move to the United States.

Republicans roared in approval when Trump proclaimed progress in weakening Obamacare, President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law.

Other parts of the speech that were popular with Republicans were his discussions of the tax cuts, the American flag, God and the mining of “beautiful clean coal.”

Democrats had invited as guests more than 20 “Dreamer” immigrants whose parents brought them into the United States illegally when they were children.

Trump urged lawmakers to work toward bipartisan compromises, but pushed a hard line on immigration, insisting on a border wall and other concessions from Democrats as part of any deal to protect the Dreamers.

Congress is trying to enact permanent protections for the young immigrants, possibly next month.

Before the speech, one Republican congressman, Paul Gosar of Arizona, asked U.S. Capitol Police to arrest and deport anyone who could not prove legal residency.

Trump’s own guests included parents of two girls murdered by the Mara Salvatrucha gang, better known as MS-13, whose existence the White House blames mostly on illegal immigration from Central America.

The State of the Union address is an opportunity for presidents to tout achievements and lay out their legislative agenda for the coming year.

This time around, it also was a chance for Democrats to hold Trump’s feet to the fire for a stream of controversies that have marked his presidency.

Many members of the Congressional Black Caucus sported colorful “kente” cloth following claims that Trump, during a private meeting on immigration, used coarse language to denigrate African countries.

Even the falling jobless rate among African Americans divided the chamber. “African-American unemployment stands at the lowest rate ever recorded,” the president proclaimed. Republican lawmakers, who are mainly white, applauded and yelled loudly, while Congressional Black Caucus members, all Democrats, sat stone-faced.

Visiting doctor, disabilities advocate discusses hardships as an African American male in the medical field

Visiting professor and doctor Feranmi Okanlami discussed his work as an advocate for African Americans in the medical field at a keynote lecture hosted by the Human Resources Equity and Inclusion of the School of Medicine and Public Health Tuesday evening.

Born in Nigeria and raised the United States, Okanlami attended Stanford University for his undergraduate degree, later went on to University of Michigan-Ann Arbor for his medical degree and then completed his orthopedic residency at Yale University.

Despite his success as a track and field athlete and a student, he described his experience while studying at Stanford and Michigan as an African American male in the medical field as one filled with constant pressures of doubt and rejection.

UW medical school funds eight organizations dedicated to improving public health in WisconsinThe University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health’s Wisconsin Partnership Program announced Monday nearly $400,000 in grant funding Read…

Okanlami recalls being pushed to do better by the chief of surgery during his first year of residency. The chief knew he would be held to a different standard than his peers.

“Despite my best efforts, I would be told that I am wrong, I will not get the credit I deserve, and I would be viewed as inferior by my peers,” Okanlami said.

During the third year of his residency, he suffered a spinal injury that resulted in paralysis from the chest downward. After surgery and several months of therapy, Okanlami regained some movement in his upper body and began his practice again.

Through this accident and the struggle of being treated and judged by his peers and even his patients, Okanlami used his story to inspire and encourage others by continuing his education. He worked to create a device that helps the accuracy of spinal repair, and went to Notre Dame as a Thesis Advisor for Engineering Science.   

UW professor aims to help caregivers communicate with doctorsIn conjunction with medical organizations and community leaders in Green County, University of Wisconsin professor Paul Smith has developed a Read…

Young African American men lack role models and information about medical school funding, Okanlami said. He hopes that by addressing these problems, more young African American men will be inspired to become physicians.

“My story is about what makes it possible to achieve that dream, despite whatever obstacles are perceived to be the way,” Okanlami said.

ExerciseBikesExpert’s Three Major Website Changes

ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO, UNITED STATES, January 30, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ — With the first month of 2018 nearing its swift and productive end, the time has come for ExerciseBikesExpert.com to take a step back and present its important improvements for the rest of the year. With 2017 being its most successful year yet, the website plans for even greater things at the moment.

If this were to be described in just one word, that would be ‘novelty’. And the best news is that this concept will be enforced in more than one direction to achieve the best results. Here are the three major website changes that have come with 2018 and will continue to unfold throughout the course of the following months.

• More detailed reviews. This new generation of spinner reviews focuses on showcasing all the pros and cons of an indoor bike so that readers who want to invest in one know exactly what they’re dealing with. Besides staples such as Life Fitness Lifecycle GX, the website also plans to constantly provide its public with detailed accounts of the latest products on the market.

• New contributors. After having successfully welcomed Luke Mitchell to the team, EBE aims to keep the flow of unique content coming by always seeking creative contributors that will add their own personal touch to the page. This makes branching out possible and offers a one-of-a-kind voice to each individual post.

• Improved routine tips and ideas. Most importantly, ExerciseBikesExpert knows the importance of a proper spin bike routine, which is why additional tips and ideas are always being discussed by the team and put into action through posts. Furthermore, the site will also take a new direction into even more other fields, such as diets and catered workouts that don’t necessarily involve spinners.

All in all, it is evident now that the accent this year will be put on novelty. While 2017 was focused on developing what the website was already famous for, the new year is a time for thinking outside the box and testing limits.

Thus, if you’re looking for anything from a spin bike review like that of the Schwinn IC2, the Sole Fitness SB700 or any other model, or if you just want to find out something about new diets or routines, EBE is a sure choice in 2018. With a mix of old, tried and tested staples, together with innovative techniques and gear, the future looks bright for the website.

About Exercise Bikes Expert
Kristin, the site’s founder, started ExerciseBikesExpert.com out of a desire to promote a healthy, workout-based lifestyle that will make people more conscious about their fitness and well-being. Its pages are all centered around offering information about indoor cycling, from spin bike reviews to entire detailed routines that will teach anyone to use them.

And if spinning isn’t your thing, then here you will also find info on weight loss, bodybuilding, muscle endurance exercises and plenty of other topics related to the field of fitness. It’s a website for everyone, from all corners of the world, and it can help you get started on the path towards better living.

Luke Samuel Mitchell
ExerciseBikesExpert

email us here