DuVernay, ‘black-ish,’ ‘Power’ win NAACP Image Awards

DuVernay, ‘black-ish,’ ‘Power’ win NAACP Image Awards

Los Angeles — A jubilant Ava DuVernay was named entertainer of the year at an NAACP Image Awards ceremony that focused on the black community’s power to create change.

DuVernay lauded other black artists from the stage as she accepted her award Monday night, naming writers and directors such as Shonda Rhimes, Gina Prince-Bythewood, Kenya Barris and “Black Panther” Ryan Coogler.

“This is our time,” DuVernay said. “We can say we were here when all this gorgeous art was happening, and that we supported it — that we lifted each other up, that we did as Dr. King said we would do: Live the dream. We’re the dream.”

Anthony Anderson hosted the ceremony at the Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California, on what would have been Martin Luther King Jr.’s 89th birthday. While his politically tinged monologue poked fun at the presidential administration and Omarosa Manigault, others used their time onstage to encourage more civic involvement and the fight for social justice.

Producer Will Packer took a dig at President Donald Trump’s recent comments about immigration as the producer accepted an award for “Girls Trip,” which won for outstanding film.

“Sisters, especially the ones from Haiti and Africa, we love you as your brothers,” he said.

Kerry Washington, Tracee Ellis Ross, Laverne Cox, Jurnee Smollet-Bell, Lena Waithe and Angela Robinson set the tone for the evening when they emerged onstage holding hands to dramatically issue a get-out-the-vote call.

The six women declared support for the Time’s Up initiative to stop sexual harassment and gender discrimination and urged viewers to speak up at the polls as well.

“The midterms are a perfect moment for us to use our voices,” Robinson said. “If we can take back a senate seat in Alabama…”

“Then we have the ability to shift the imbalance of power,” Smollet-Bell said.

Barris’ show “black-ish” was the night’s big winner. The ABC hit was named best comedy series and took acting honors for stars Ross and Anderson.

“It’s an extraordinary thing to be able to show what a beautiful black family looks like on television,” Ross said as the cast accepted the comedy series honor.

“Power” was named best drama series, and star Omari Hardwick won for dramatic actor.

Other winners included “Gifted” actress Octavia Spencer and “Empire” star Taraji P. Henson, who were both absent, and Daniel Kaluuya, who won for his leading role in “Get Out.”

The British actor was clearly delighted at his victory.

“I don’t think you’re allowed to beat Denzel Washington in acting competitions,” said Kaluuya, who bested Washington for the prize. The 28-year-old actor thanked his mom and “Get Out” writer-director Jordan Peele.

“So many people didn’t believe in me, and you did, and you made all of us feel included,” Kaluuya said. “Thank you so much for letting us be seen.”

NAACP president Derrik Johnson asked viewers to text in their pledge to vote in 2018 before presenting the President’s Award to Danny Glover.

Glover was recognized for his professional and philanthropic contributions, particularly his work with the United Nations and his advocacy for labor unions.

Glover spoke specifically of a Nissan plant in Canton, Mississippi, where 80 percent of employees are black, that has yet to organize.

“Civil rights and labor rights have always been one and the same,” he said.

The special awards provided some of the night’s most poignant moments.

Halle Berry talked about the significance of presenting the NAACP Image Awards on Martin Luther King Jr. day.

“We need to take heed to his eloquent words: ‘Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter,’” she said. “Today is an affirmation that we will never ever, ever, ever be silent again.”

She presented the Music Makes a Difference award to Charlie Wilson, who talked about his road from addiction and homelessness to musical success and philanthropy.

He said he prayed and promised that if he could survive the streets, he would return to serve others. Wilson said Monday that he has been sober for 22 years and is focused on helping homeless addicts.

Labor organizer William Lucy received the Chairman’s Award for his more than 40 years of service. Beyond his union leadership, Lucy was also an activist who fought apartheid in South Africa.

He dedicated his award to the Memphis sanitation workers who went on strike in 1968, several of whom were in the audience at the Image Awards. King spoke to the striking employees the night before he was assassinated.

Another arresting moment in the show came during singer Andra Day’s chilling performance of Billie Holiday’s “Strange Fruit.” Rapper Common joined her for their song “Stand Up for Something,” and the whole audience rose to its feet.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Read or Share this story: http://detne.ws/2EJoiHc

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Oil paintings by Birger Sandzen (1871-1946) and wonderful art glass pieces will come up for bid Feb. 24 at Woody Auction

One of four paintings in the auction by Swedish-born American artist Birger Sandzen.

Woody Auction will celebrate the grand opening of its new Douglass gallery with a major antique and fine art auction on Saturday, Feb. 24, in Douglass, Kansas.

The February 24th grand opening will be the first of many auctions to be showcased in our new facility. Like in all our past auctions, everything will be sold without reserve to the highest bidder.”

— Jason Woody

DOUGLASS, KS, UNITED STATES, January 17, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ — DOUGLASS, Kan. – Woody Auction will celebrate the grand opening of its new Douglass gallery with a major antique and fine art auction on Saturday, February 24th, one that will be highlighted by several original artworks by the renowned Swedish-born Kansas painter Birger Sandzén (1871-1946), plus outstanding collections of Royal Bayreuth, Daum, Galle, Tiffany, Pairpoint, pattern glass, and furniture.

The new showroom is located at 130 East Third Street in Douglass, located just south and east of Wichita, not far from Interstate 35 and Hwy. 5/Kellogg Rd. “The February 24th grand opening will be the first of many quality auctions to be showcased in our new facility,” said Jason Woody of Woody Auction. “Like in all our past auctions, everything will be sold without reserve to the highest bidder.”

All four of the original Sandzén paintings are fresh to the market, not offered to the public in over 50 years. The McCaslin Royal Bayreuth collection of 132 items out of Indiana features many of the rarest animal forms available. A private collection from Illinois will present a great selection of Daum, Galle, Tiffany, Pairpoint, pattern glass and additional quality art glass. The period furniture collection features Meeks, Wooton, Hunzinger and more. Also sold will be bronze statues, lovely brides baskets, and more.

Birger Sandzén was born in Blidsberg, Sweden, in 1871. He studied art in Stockholm and Paris early on, before coming to Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas in 1894, to teach languages and assist in the art and vocal music departments. He remained at Bethany for the remainder of his career, becoming the principal art instructor in 1899 and retiring in 1946. He painted right up until his death, in 1954.
During his lifetime Sandzén completed more than 2,600 oil paintings and 500 watercolors. He created 207 lithographs, 94 block prints and 27 drypoints which, when the editions are totaled, amount to over 33,000 prints. He was also a skilled draftsman, filling over 80 sketchbooks. He exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Sweden and today his works are found in many museums worldwide.

The centerpiece artwork in the group of four Sandzén paintings in the sale is Cedars and Rocks, a vivid and colorful oil on canvas landscape rendering of Manitou Springs, Colo., dated 1922. The 36 inch by 48 inch painting was professionally cleaned by WCCFA in Denver in 2015 and is housed in its original frame. “It’s also the finest artwork we’ve ever had the privilege to bring to auction,” Mr. Woody said.

The other paintings are Lake in the Rockies, a 26 inch by 22 inch oil on canvas using very thick paint with high ridges (the meringue technique), in the original frame, dated 1921; Horses in Wyoming, a 20 inch by 24 inch oil on board, a subject for another painting, circa 1930; and an untitled oil on board (various references have indicated Glimpse of Mountain Lake), 36 inches by 48 inches, circa 1938.

Collectors of Royal Bayreuth are in for a treat. Lots will include a 6 ¼ inch tall unmarked candlestick holder depicting a full figure fox in a colorful dinner jacket; a 4 ¾ inch tall turtle lemonade pitcher with blue mark; a 7 ¼ inch tall Santa Claus lemonade pitcher with blue mark; a 6 ½ inch tall snake water pitcher of excellent quality, rare with a blue mark; and an unmarked 8 ¼ inch tall squirrel water pitcher.

Lamps and lighting will feature a rare and beautiful Jefferson banquet lamp, electrified, displaying a scene of a warrior riding a white stallion while holding a lance and sword, set against an elaborate mosaic style background; and a must-see Galle signed figural table lamp with a French cameo art glass shade having a carved pink and green floral design with elaborate interior floral carved highlights, set on a fine bronze base showing a woman standing and feeding three rabbits, artist signed “F. Gopnik”.

Tiffany Studios will be represented in the sale, including an all original desk lamp with signed “L.C.T. Favrile” decorated art glass shade, signed “Tiffany Studios 417” on a weighted base; and a 5 ½ inch tall Cypriot art glass vase, very rare, exhibiting beautiful colors and signed “L.C. Tiffany Favrile 8324J”.

Daum Nancy will feature a French cameo art glass vase, 4 ¾ inches tall, signed, with gorgeous colors and a fall season décor; and a 28 inch tall signed French cameo art glass vase having a pale lavender background with cameo carved white leaf and blossom overlay. Also sold will be a Wavecrest plaque with 10-inch round portrait of Queen Louisa, with green, cream and pink tones, in a gilt metal frame.

Brides baskets are a huge hit with collectors. One lot certain to get paddles wagging is the 14 ½ inch by 12 inch signed Crown Milano triangular-shaped ruffled bowl with pansy and circular designs, set on an elaborate Barbour #272 figural silverplate stand and featuring three winged cherubs – a beautiful piece.

Bronzes will showcase an original statue, 39 inches tall by 16 inches wide, titled Cerberus, artist signed “Raoul Verlet” (Fr., 1857-1923), from the Ferdinand Barbeditenne foundry in Paris, with great detail and patina; and a 24-inch-tall statue, signed by Edmond Louis Charles Tassel (Fr., 1870-1900), of a young maiden carefully crossing a stream, on a marble base, titled Passage du Ruisseau, dated 1890.

The furniture category will include a pair of original, marked Hunzinger Renaissance Revival chairs with carved female heads, curved wooden sides and ebony highlights and dated 1869, upholstered with tufted pale green floral fabric; and a two-piece Meeks rococo-style parlor set, with a laminated rosewood couch and matching chair in the Stanton Hall pattern, both with red velvet upholstery.

Also sold will be an American Renaissance Revival two-hinge, standard grade patent desk made circa 1874 by Wooton Desk Company (Indianapolis, Ind.), walnut with burl walnut and birds-eye maple highlights; and a late 19th or early 20th century hand-carved Black Forest wooden male dog, 4 ½ inches tall, showing a finely detailed male St. Bernard at rest, attributed to the Swiss carver Walter Mader.

Online bidding will be available around Friday, January 19th, by going to www.liveauctioneers.com/woody-auction-llc. Internet bidders are encouraged to register at least 48 hours in advance of the auction. Absentee bids should be submitted with a written statement indicating the amount of the bid. All absentee bids must be received no later than Thursday, Feb. 22nd. Bids may be fax’d to 316-746-2145, or e-mailed to info@woodyauction.com.

As for lodging, there are three hotels in the area. The Comfort Inn, new to Augusta, KS (316-260-3006); the Holiday Inn Express, in Andover, KS (316-733-8833); and the Hampton Inn, in Derby, KS (316-425-7900) are all within a 15-20 minute drive from the Woody auction facility. Moving forward, Woody Auction will conduct regular auction events in the Douglass location and occasionally at other venues.

Woody Auction is always accepting quality consignments for future sales. To consign an item, an estate, or a collection, you may call them at (316) 747-2694; or you can e-mail them at info@woodyauction.com. To learn more about Woody Auction and the February 24th auction, please visit www.woodyauction.com.

# # # #

Jason Woody
Woody Auction
(316) 747-2694
email us here

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

DuVernay, 'black-ish,' 'Power' win at NAACP Image Awards

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A jubilant Ava DuVernay was named entertainer of the year at the NAACP Image Awards ceremony that focused on the black community’s power to create change.

DuVernay lauded other black artists from the stage as she accepted her award Monday night, naming writers and directors such as Shonda Rhimes, Gina Prince-Bythewood, Kenya Barris and “Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler.

“This is our time,” DuVernay said. “We can say we were here when all this gorgeous art was happening, and that we supported it – that we lifted each other up, that we did as Dr. King said we would do: Live the dream. We’re the dream.”

DuVernay directed the films “Middle of Nowhere” and “Selma” and the documentary “13th.” Her adaptation of “A Wrinkle in Time,” starring Oprah Winfrey and Reese Witherspoon, is set for release in March.

Anthony Anderson hosted the ceremony at the Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California, on what would have been Martin Luther King Jr.’s 89th birthday.

While his politically tinged monologue poked fun at the presidential administration and Omarosa Manigault, others used their time onstage to encourage more civic involvement and the fight for social justice.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

NEW SPECIAL VIP PRIVATE TOUR DEEP SEA FISHING AND ISLA MUJERES SNORKELING ADVENTURE FROM CANCUN & RIVIERA MAYA RESORTS

Isla Mujeres awaits you!

ENJOY A FABULOUS VIP PRIVATE TOUR AND AVOID THE HOARDES DEEP SEA FISHING AND EXPLORING ISLA MUJERES. ALL INCLUSIVE FIRST CLASS TOUR (MAX 10 PERSONS)

CANCUN, QUINTANA ROO, MEXICO, January 16, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ — VISITORS TO THE SUNNY VACATION PARADISE IN CANCUN NOW HAVE A “CHANCE” TO “ESACAPE” THE CONFINES OF THEIR ALL INCLUSIVE

HOTEL FOR A FUN FILLED DAY “ON THE WATER” ON A PRIVATE VIP BASIS CHARTERING THEIR OWN PRIVATE 500HP SPEEDBOAT/MINI-YACHT”.

CANCUN WHALE SHARK TOURS ONE OF CANCUN’S PREMIER TOUR OPERATORS IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE NEW VIP PRIVATE TOURS FROM CANCUN

& RIVIERA MAYA RESORTS FOR A GREAT DAY DEEP SEA FISHING COMBINED WITH OUTSTANDING SNORKELING AT VARIOUS SPOTS NEAR ISLA

MUJERES, JUST OFF THE COAST FROM CANCUN.

THE DAY BEGINS WITH A PRIVATE TRANSFER FROM YOUR HOTEL/RESORT TO YOUR WAITING MINI-YACHT ON THE NORTH SHORE OF CANCUN.

THEIR YOUR CAPTAIN NESTOR AND FAMILY WILL BE AT YOUR BECKON & CALL TO ENJOY A HIGHLY PRIVATE EXPERIENCE 2ND TO NONE IN

CANCUN. INSTEAD OF FIGHTING THE CROWDS ON PUBLIC TOURS YOU’LL BE ALL ALONE ON THE TURQUOISE WATERS FISHING FOR YOUR

“CATCH OF THE DAY” AND ENJOYING PRIVATE SNORKELING NEAR ISLA MUJERES. EVERYTHING IS INCLUDED “FIRST CLASS”…. HIGH

QUALITY FISHING GEAR, BAIT, FOOD, BEVERAGES…A GREAT BBQ SHORE LUNCH FOLLOWED BY A SLOW CRUISE THROUGH THE BACK CANALS

OF ISLA MUJERES AS YOU SUN YOURSELF IN ABSOLUTE LUXURY.

WHATEVER YOU CATCH YOU CAN KEEP AND/OR YOUR CREW WILL PREPARE FOR YOU INCLUDING THE WORLD’S “FRESHEST”,”TASTIEST”

CEVICHE (THAT FAMOUS FISH SALAD PREPARED WITH FRESHLY CAUGHT FISH FILLETS TENDERLY MARINATED IN FRESH LIME JUICE &

MAYAN SPICES, HAND TOSSED WITH FRESH TOMATO, CILANTRO, ONIONS, & OPTIONAL HABANERO PEPPERS! SERVED ON CRISPY TORTILLA

CHIPS…….IT IS THE BEST & FRESHEST CEVICHE YOU’LL EVER EAT !!!!!!

CAPTAIN NESTOR, CREW, AND FAMILY WILL GIVE YOU A SPECTACULAR DAY YOU’LL WANT TO RECORD ON FILM WITH “LOTTSA” PICTURES

TO ALWAYS REMEMBER THIS DAY AS YOUR BEST TOUR DONE WHILE IN THE TROPICAL PARADISE OF CANCUN!!!

BOOKINGS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE 2018 SEASON AND SPACE IS “LIMITED”

DONT FORGET ABOUT THE UPCOMING “WHALE SHARK” SEASON STARTING JUNE 1. YOUR CHANCE TO ENJOY THE AMAZING ADVENTURE OF

SNORKELING WITH THE OCEANS LARGEST FISH! “THE WHALE SHARK”. CANCUN WHALE SHARK TOURS CANCUN’S #1 ADVENTURE TOUR

OPERATOR HAS TRANSFORMED THE LIVES OF MORE THAN 40,000 ADVENTURE SEEKERS THE PAST 15 YEARS! ITS ALSO SOMETHING NOT TO

BE MISSED!

EVERYTHING YU NEED TO KNOW & TO BOOK IS READY FOR DISCRIMINATING CLIENTS ONLINE WWW.CANCUNWHALESHARKTOURS.COM

RODDRIGO “The Whale Shark Daddy”
Cancun Whale Shark Tours
305-433-7523
email us here

BIRDS EYE DRONE VIEW OF ISLA MUJERES

[embedded content]

Culture Report: Booking Time With ‘The Last Black Man in Barrio Logan’

Ramel Wallace last black man in barrio logan

Ramel Wallace is a musician and artist who’s using “Airbnb Experiences” to educate tourists about black history in Barrio Logan. / Photo by Kinsee Morlan

Home-sharing website Airbnb has rolled out, and recently ramped up, something called “Experiences.”

The new feature allows people to use the Airbnb website to book tours with local hosts. Folks can, for example, “swim like a mermaid” in Chicago, or meditate with a shaman in Bali.

Airbnb’s CEO Brian Chesky has said the purpose of the new feature is to “immerse in the local community” and experience places in a more authentic way.

In San Diego, experiences include hanging out with a local gallery owner in the Gaslamp or learning how to make boba tea in Mira Mesa.

In Barrio Logan, artist and musician Ramel Wallace invites guests to hang out with him and experience the grassroots renaissance happening there through art and food. He then takes his guests back to The Holyfield, his small recording studio on Logan Avenue in Barrio Logan (a space he also rents out via Airbnb Experiences) and shows them “The Last Black Man in Barrio Logan,” a short documentary he made to introduce people to some of the history of the black community in Barrio Logan, which is now known as a mostly Latino neighborhood.

Wallace said his great grandmother lived in a yellow house in Barrio Logan decades ago. Years later, he said, his dad unknowingly ended up in that same house, and Wallace spent some of his youth there. When he found out about the house, he started digging and learning about the black community that used to live in Barrio Logan, and why and when they left.

He’s still in research mode. But so far he’s pinned the exodus of the black community to the 1920s through 1960s. By the late 70s, Wallace said, most black people in San Diego steered clear of Barrio Logan, in part because of the emergence of gangs, but also because of racially discriminatory housing practices that put restrictions on who and where people could buy homes.

“I’m kind of using the whole Airbnb situation to funnel conversations about all that,” Wallace said.

The conversations following the film cover gentrification, racism and other hot-button issues related to socioeconomic inequality, he said.

Wallace used to live in an apartment in Barrio Logan. He rented out the apartment via Airbnb, too, but he said the landlord raised the rent to a price he couldn’t afford, so now he lives in a cheaper place in National City. He tells guests about that, too, and sometimes the conversation veers into the merits of Airbnb itself, and whether the website is fueling gentrification in low-income neighborhoods like Barrio Logan.

Brent Beltran, a community activist who lives in Barrio Logan, thinks Airbnb is causing problems in his neighborhood.

“I’m not opposed to Ramel doing this,” Beltran wrote in a Facebook message. “He’s a long time resident and it’s important to highlight Barrio Logan/Logan Heights’ African American history. But I’m opposed to businesses buying homes in this community for the sole purpose of renting them out as short term vacation rentals.”

Wallace’s Airbnb experience risks propping up black culture as something to sell to outsiders. Tourists are essentially paying to hang out with a black artist and experience an historically underserved community through his eyes. But Wallace said most of his guests so far have been people of color, and often the first thing black people ask is, “Where are all the black people in San Diego?”

Wallace said it opens up a conversation about black culture in San Diego, and where people can find it thriving.

“So ‘The Last Black Man,’ it resonates because, I mean, it fits for Barrio Logan, it fits for San Francisco, it fits for San Diego, it fits for the entire nation and what’s happening on a global scale,” Wallace said.

You’re reading the Culture Report, Voice of San Diego‘s weekly collection of the region’s arts and culture news.

Students Watching ‘Hamilton,’ Arguing About Artists’ Wages, and More

• Michael Andrew Currey is the new executive director of the California Ballet Company. (Times of San Diego)

• Tijuana artist Roberto Romero-Molina has built an immersive multimedia installation that’s on view at the San Diego Art Institute through March 17. Romero-Molina’s solo show opens Saturday and will include listening and coding workshops, concerts and more.

Roberto Romero-Molina

Tijuana artist Roberto Romero-Molina’s installation opens Saturday at the San Diego Art Institute in Balboa Park. / Photo courtesy of the San Diego Art Institute

• I saw “Hamilton” over the weekend and the Broadway musical is as good as everyone says it is. It’s also super expensive, though, which is why programs like this one allowing thousands of local students to see and learn about the play are important. (KPBS)

• “Hamilton” is not the only thing happening in San Diego theater, of course. Union-Tribune theater critic James Hebert uses the wild popularity of “Hamilton” to examine the merits and history of San Diego’s local theater scene so that it matters to more people.

• There’s a conversation unfolding on a Facebook group for San Diego artists that I help moderate about the ethics of asking artists to work for free.

• The Union-Tribune is super excited about the San Diego Symphony’s “It’s About Time” festival taking place until Feb. 11, calling it an “ear-bending, eye-popping, borders-leaping music marathon.”

• San Diego Opera and San Diego State University’s School of Music and Dance have announced a new, shared position between the two organizations. (Opera Wire)

• CityBeat profiles Wick Alexander, a San Diego artist whose work is currently on view at the Athenaeum Music & Arts Library.

• Choreographer Jean Isaacs has created five dances inspired by five different personal family photos. She’s working toward choreographing a full-length performance based on her personal history.

• Encinitas is looking to put public art in all five of its neighborhoods. (Union-Tribune)

• Check out the cool balloon art being made at the New Children’s Museum right now. (Union-Tribune)

San Diego advocates are putting pressure on City Council members to devote hotel tax dollars, as promised, to the arts.

• Researchers are exploring whether music can be used to treat nursing home patients with brain injuries. (KPBS)

• This week’s Plays by Young Writers Festival features professional productions by the winners of the 2017 California Young Playwrights Contest.

• Every time I read one of CityBeat columnist Ryan Bradford’s pieces, I LOL. He’ll be among those local authors reading at a literary event in Barrio Logan on Saturday.

• Lots of people are expected to show up this weekend for the second annual Women’s March San Diego. (NBC 7)

• Patric Stillman runs a gallery in North Park. Here’s a good Q-and-A with him. (SDVoyager)

• Check out this event that turns Lucha Libre-style Mexican wrestling into performance art.

• See contemporary art by Tijuana artists in a new show opening in San Ysidro.

• This week, VOSD Podcast Network show Cura Caos is recording a live conversation with Nicole Capretz and Ismahan Abdullahi, two community activists who also host the podcast Flip the Script.

• A new skatepark is opening in City Heights this week. And another new skate park — one of the largest in the state — will open in Linda Vista this week, too. (10News)

• A new play in Point Loma explores what it might be like if President Donald Trump builds the new border wall.

Food, Beer, Weed and Booze News

• In a new episode of I Made it in San Diego, Lisa Halverstadt talks to local farmers market guru Brian Beevers.

brian beevers san diego

Entrepreneur Brian Beevers has built several farmer’s markets in the region and is the owner of Simply Local in North Park. / Photo by Adriana Heldiz

• San Diego made it as No. 4 on this list of the country’s top 10 coffee cities. (Traveler)

• San Diego Restaurant Week is happening.

• Two new downtown beer bars are opening here and here. (Eater)

• A new vegan food truck is celebrating its grand opening this week.

• Meat lovers may want to take note of this new Argentinian restaurant downtown. (San Diego Magazine)

• Here’s a good explainer on what you need to know about legal weed. (DoSD)

• Folks from the local cannabis industry want folks to call it “cannabis” rather than pot, weed or anything else. It’s all part of an ongoing effort to normalize cannabis culture in San Diego. (Union-Tribune)

Kinsee Morlan is engagement editor at Voice of San Diego. Email her at kinsee@vosd.org with arts and culture news and tips. Want to recommend this culture newsletter to someone? Share this sign-up link.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Asheville’s black hip-hop artists and venue bookers seek common ground

Around Asheville, local music promoter Duke Finley has earned the name “Party Man” for organizing house and apartment parties over the past decade. But he’s encountered difficulty when it comes to securing shows for local hip-hop artists in the city’s performance spaces.

“I can’t get any venues. I’ve tried. I’ve called and left emails,” Finley says. “[A lot of] the venue owners don’t like hip-hop. Hip-hop, you know, you get all that B.S. — guns, fighting and smoking in their venue. That’s one reason why it’s kind of hard for local acts like myself.”

Finley says an occasional lack of respect for the environment by concertgoers negatively affects hip-hop’s standing among venue bookers, making it less likely for musicians within the genre to get shows. That means fewer gigs for black artists like CJ Harrison, who raps under the name YE. Harrison has had some success: He praises The Boiler Room for giving “everyone in the city” an opportunity to perform and is thankful for Timo’s House and its support of local hip-hop. He says The Orange Peel is also welcoming and that The Grey Eagle recently started working with more area rappers.

“The people who are trying to do better, they’ve got a vision to do something. … Everybody deserves a chance, in my eyes,” Harrison says. “We just want to show our talents, but you’ve got to open the door for me.”

Crowd control

Most of the time, however, Harrison says that door remains shut. He feels that many local venue owners are scared of the crowd that hip-hop attracts, despite the influx of money from entry fees, drink sales and artists’ willingness to provide extra security and meet bookers’ requests. Though fights break out at any style of music show, he says that when one occurs at a hip-hop event, the genre is unfairly discriminated against. Harrison cites a party at the now-closed Olive or Twist a few years ago when an altercation between four or five people ended hip-hop’s presence at the venue.

BUSINESSMEN: Local music promoter Duke “Party Man” Finley, left, and Justin Ferraby, operations manager at The Orange Peel, chat at the venue’s bar. Ferraby says he welcomes emails and calls from local hip-hop artists and is willing to give them a chance. Photo by Cindy Kunst