The Gallery Below’s fascinating and eclectic Black Art Matters exhibit comes to a close

click to enlarge Black Art Matters Closing Reception, 6-10 p.m., The Gallery Below, 718B N. Weber St., $5, facebook.com/thegallerybelow. - NATHAN TONER PHOTOGRAPHY

  • Nathan Toner Photography
  • Black Art Matters Closing Reception, 6-10 p.m., The Gallery Below, 718B N. Weber St., $5, facebook.com/thegallerybelow.

For Black History Month, The Gallery Below chose to present a truly fascinating and eclectic exhibition of art created by black artists. The gallery walls may soon empty of the photography, paintings, drawings and more that have been enriching the space all month, but not before the exhibition goes out with a bang. Join the gallery for a closing reception in partnership with Poetry719’s Colorado Springs Black Voices Matter open mic. Local poets, musicians, dancers and more will take the stage, with refreshments and revelry both inside and outside the gallery.

Black Art Matters

@ The Gallery Below

718B N. Weber St.

Downtown

Colorado Springs, CO

When: Through Feb. 28

347/961-4789

Art Exhibits and Open Mic

‘); popup.append(”); var closer = jQuery(”); popup.append(closer); /** * Create an overlay to anchor the popup to the map. */ var overlay = new ol.Overlay({ element: popup.get(0), autoPan: true, autoPanAnimation: { duration: 250 } }); map.addOverlay(overlay); /** * Add a click handler to hide the overlay. * @return {boolean} Don’t follow the href. */ closer.click(function(e) { overlay.setPosition(undefined); e.target.blur(); return false; }); function updateInfoBox(overlay, event) { var map = event.map; var pixel = map.getEventPixel(event.originalEvent); var features = map.getFeaturesAtPixel(pixel, {hitTolerance: 20}); if (overlay && features) { var feature = features[0]; var content = jQuery(overlay.getElement()).find(‘.popup-content’); const id = feature.get(‘id’); const url = feature.get(‘url’); const name = feature.get(‘name’); const teaser = feature.get(‘teaser’); const address = feature.get(‘address’); const addresssupplement = feature.get(‘addresssupplement’); const city = feature.get(‘city’); const state = feature.get(‘state’); const postalcode = feature.get(‘postalcode’); const phone = feature.get(‘phone’); const neighborhoodgroup = feature.get(‘neighborhoodgroup’); const neighborhood = feature.get(‘neighborhood’); const category = feature.get(‘category’); var info = jQuery(“”); info.append(‘

‘ + name + ‘

‘); (teaser) && info.append(‘‘); var details = jQuery(‘‘); (addresssupplement) ? details.append(‘‘ + address + ‘‘ + ‘ ‘ + addresssupplement + ‘‘) : details.append(‘‘ + address + ‘‘); details.append(‘ ‘ + city + ‘, ‘ + ‘‘ + state + ‘ ‘ + ‘‘ + postalcode + ‘‘); (phone) && details.append(‘ ‘ + phone + ‘‘); (neighborhoodgroup) ? details.append(‘ ‘ + neighborhoodgroup + ‘: ‘ + ‘‘ + neighborhood + ‘‘) : details.append(‘ ‘ + neighborhood + ‘‘); details.append(‘ ‘ + category + ‘‘); info.append(details); /* div.details */ info.append(‘ view listing‘); content.html(info.html()); overlay.setPosition(event.coordinate); } else { overlay.setPosition(undefined); } return; } map.on(‘singleclick’, function(evt) { if (evt.dragging) { overlay.setPosition(undefined); return; } updateInfoBox(overlay, evt); }); });

Black Art Matters Exhibition Closing Party

@ The Gallery Below

718B N. Weber St.

Downtown

Colorado Springs, CO

When: Sat., Feb. 23, 8-10 p.m.

347/961-4789

Price: $5

Art Events

‘); popup.append(”); var closer = jQuery(”); popup.append(closer); /** * Create an overlay to anchor the popup to the map. */ var overlay = new ol.Overlay({ element: popup.get(0), autoPan: true, autoPanAnimation: { duration: 250 } }); map.addOverlay(overlay); /** * Add a click handler to hide the overlay. * @return {boolean} Don’t follow the href. */ closer.click(function(e) { overlay.setPosition(undefined); e.target.blur(); return false; }); function updateInfoBox(overlay, event) { var map = event.map; var pixel = map.getEventPixel(event.originalEvent); var features = map.getFeaturesAtPixel(pixel, {hitTolerance: 20}); if (overlay && features) { var feature = features[0]; var content = jQuery(overlay.getElement()).find(‘.popup-content’); const id = feature.get(‘id’); const url = feature.get(‘url’); const name = feature.get(‘name’); const teaser = feature.get(‘teaser’); const address = feature.get(‘address’); const addresssupplement = feature.get(‘addresssupplement’); const city = feature.get(‘city’); const state = feature.get(‘state’); const postalcode = feature.get(‘postalcode’); const phone = feature.get(‘phone’); const neighborhoodgroup = feature.get(‘neighborhoodgroup’); const neighborhood = feature.get(‘neighborhood’); const category = feature.get(‘category’); var info = jQuery(“”); info.append(‘

‘ + name + ‘

‘); (teaser) && info.append(‘‘); var details = jQuery(‘‘); (addresssupplement) ? details.append(‘‘ + address + ‘‘ + ‘ ‘ + addresssupplement + ‘‘) : details.append(‘‘ + address + ‘‘); details.append(‘ ‘ + city + ‘, ‘ + ‘‘ + state + ‘ ‘ + ‘‘ + postalcode + ‘‘); (phone) && details.append(‘ ‘ + phone + ‘‘); (neighborhoodgroup) ? details.append(‘ ‘ + neighborhoodgroup + ‘: ‘ + ‘‘ + neighborhood + ‘‘) : details.append(‘ ‘ + neighborhood + ‘‘); details.append(‘ ‘ + category + ‘‘); info.append(details); /* div.details */ info.append(‘ view listing‘); content.html(info.html()); overlay.setPosition(event.coordinate); } else { overlay.setPosition(undefined); } return; } map.on(‘singleclick’, function(evt) { if (evt.dragging) { overlay.setPosition(undefined); return; } updateInfoBox(overlay, evt); }); });

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

New Space for Black Students Opens for the Spring Semester

From left to right: A’Nisa Megginson, Harmony Hemmings-Pallay and Hunter Major, curators of the “I Too, Am Divine” exhibit. (Photo by Emily Mason)

Chatter fills the fourth floor of the Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life as people settle on couches around a wooden structure covered in light pink plastic blossoms. Curators refer to it as “the altar,” and it’s affixed with a poster reading, “I, Too, Am Divine,” the name of the exhibition celebrating black spiritualism.

The space was filled with laughter and music as people enjoyed authentic Cajun cuisine — home-cooked by one of the event curators — and Ethiopian dishes ordered in. The night began with speeches from two of the curators and a performance of “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” otherwise known as the black national anthem.

The exhibition will run during the rest of spring semester and feature pieces by black artists at NYU, hand selected by the three curators, A’Nisa Megginson, Hunter Major and Harmony Hemmings-Pallay. The idea was to give black students a space to safely explore their spirituality and blackness through art and discussion.

“We’ve never seen a space on this campus that intentionally integrates both [blackness and spirituality] together,” Major said. “I think that blackness doesn’t fit into one religion or spiritual identity at all so we’re trying to create a space that’s not just a room but a movement and a connection between people.”

Over the course of the semester, the curators plan to host various events in the venue including discussions, teach-ins and tours. The physical space is accompanied by a digital campaign spanning across Instagram, Twitter and soon YouTube. The campaign will feature live streams, photos and interviews with black faculty on campus, as well as prominent black figures outside of the NYU community.

“I wanted to cater to conversations that had to be cut short because the event ends and the Kimmel building closes at 11 p.m.,” Major said. “Social media is a space where people can stay in touch and engage in a lot of different ways.”

One of the main hopes for the opening event and the exhibition as a whole is to provide a space for black students and faculty on campus to get to know each other. Tisch first-year Brittany Alexander, an artist that contributed to the exhibition, was especially looking forward to this aspect of the exhibition.

“[I’m excited for] meeting the other artists, seeing how they create their art and what inspires them,” Alexander said. “I’m really excited to talk about that and black spirituality and finally be able to relate to people in my own community about spirituality.”

The opening alone touched some of those in attendance, like Steinhardt senior Maya Mahmud.

“It was so beautiful; I remember singing [“Lift Every Voice and Sing”] in Kwanza,” Mahmud said. “I actually took the lyrics home to put them up. I’d never sung it in a such a public space with people I didn’t know.”

The curators are still accepting and encouraging submissions to the exhibition. The application can be found here:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc5W0X_PbvuG9U_7NYDQkVVcd5uquyDmJbdWmWi2g1wguDfjw/viewform

Email Emily Mason at [email protected].

Advertisement

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Honoring the Black Press: Past and Future

By Tiffany C. Ginyard, AFRO Managing Editor, [email protected]

This week, the AFRO concludes its special Black History Month coverage “Honoring the Black Press: Past and Future.”

In week one, we recognized the legacy of the Black Press over the course of two centuries and the social and political context in which it was born, highlighting places on the timeline where it’s voice have heard the loudest and with the greatest impact.

In week two, we looked at highlights in American history when the Black Press was there to capture the scene, unpack the story, and deliver the truth. We were reminded of the warrior spirit of the Black journalist. We remembered our professional responsibility as well as our obligations to our community.

In week three, we honored our BBWs (Beautiful Black Women) for their relentless commitment to justice and equality through storytelling.

A guiding principle of all journalism is to tell the story without becoming the story. For the Black Press it goes even deeper. While Black journalists retain the required measure of objectivity, we can never divorce ourselves from the reality of our existence on this planet. So, Black journalists must be the truth that we tell.

In this final week, we celebrate how far we’ve come, acknowledge where we are, and make note of what it will take to forge forward.

“From hot type, to cold type, to digital, the AFRO has been at the forefront of the ever-changing media landscape for 126 years,” says Frances “Toni” Draper, publisher and CEO of the AFRO-American Newspapers. “Today, we offer a wide variety of platforms to get the word out, including a robust array of social media products. However, our basic mission of championing our people, our causes, our hope, dreams and aspirations remains strong–likely stronger than it ever was. Black lives have always mattered and continue to matter to us.”

To conclude this series, we talk to Black male journalists, stewards of America’s truth, about how they perceive their individual role in the collective work of the Black Press, the state of the Black Press today, and the future of its reach among its own community.

Dorothy Boulware, former AFRO managing editor contributed to this article.

Anthony Wilson, lead instructor, NABJ Multimedia Short Course, NC A&T University, and

Anchor/Reporter for ABC11 in Greensboro, N.C.

Anthony Wilson (Courtesy Photo)

“As a native Baltimorean who remembers the twice a week publication of the Afro, I’m happy to provide some quotes you might consider useful.

“Going back to the days when Wiley Daniels was the only brother Baltimore viewers could watch anchoring daily, the men and women who sit in those chairs have understood the expectations of news consumers who look like us. We’re role models, of course, but we’re also representing the community’s concerns in editorial meetings while sharing information about openings in our newsrooms.

“Objective reporting is the goal for journalists who are not editorial staff, but many who support Black owned outlets expect them to take sides on issues that concern the African-American community(for example, the constantly evolving Smolett developments).

“That said, to paraphrase a metaphorical observation about relative cause and effect, if the newspaper industry has a cold, the Black press is battling pneumonia.  Ad dollars are shrinking, which affects the salaries journalists can expect from media, and some of them choose to go where the money seems to be. But the tide could be turning now, as so called mainstream media trim staffs with layoffs and early retirement offers and experienced Black journalists consider their options.

“At best, the Black press absolutely continues the mission established back in 1827 by ‘Freedom’s Journal.’ The challenges today are money and access to the potential audience. Those who prefer print media as a primary source for news are aging just as many papers are shrinking, physically and editorially. Some of the businesses that traditionally advertise in print media are hurting, too, and that affects the amounts they spend with the Black press.  And we’re now a couple of generations in with an audience that expects access to news and information online, for free.

Social media are definitely where today’s Black audience gathers today. We are, and we look for, much more than ratchet video clips and gossip…although the interest in the lifestyles of so called stars remains a consistent driver of online activity and engagement.

We who continue to support our legacy media hope publishers and editorial staff can find the right mix, one that can make the Black press in general and the AFRO in particular a multigenerational, multimedia must read. We can get very real with each other while occupying a mutually agreed comfort zone:  a church, a club, a gym, a hair salon or a barber shop. The former Johnson Publishing brands are struggling with that challenge now, especially after the current owners of Ebony were late with payments to freelance writers. Other members of the Black press have a unique opportunity now to bridge that gap, and continue the necessary work as griots and moderators of the ongoing conversations within the Black community.

Ron Harris, former managing editor of the Howard University News Service and former managing editor of the Afro-American Newspapers.

Ron Harris (Courtesy Photo)

“As an African-American journalist, someone who comes from a community that has dealt with injustice and inequity for its entire existence on this continent, I am extremely attuned to and drawn to changing that reality for African-Americans, other historically oppressed populations and other Americans as well.  Consequently, I have spent my career reporting and writing stories that expose inequities in American society, health care, education, law enforcement, jobs, culture and politics, as well as seeking solutions those problems.

“With a handful of of notable exceptions — a few large newspapers and cable news networks — most media, including the Black press, are in decline and struggling to survive in the face of a new economic paradigm created by technological advances that have shifted how Americans get their information.  However, if the Black press, which to some degree has been in economic decline for decades, aggressively applies innovation to new technology,  this can be a time of invigoration.  In many ways, social media and the web level the playing field for the Black press, allowing it to be more timely as well as provide readers and viewers a broader pallet of information and to focus our attention in a way mainstream media does not.

As for now, Black news outlets have not scratched the surface of the possibilities of social media to engage the African-American community. The key is to broaden its audience. Right now, its audience skews too old.  It has to create a newsroom driven by young journalists under the tutelage of more experienced professionals that will be much more creative and innovative. The ideas and the innovation will come from youth and those willing to embrace new idea and new formats. While not abandoning the valuable lessons of the past, they will divine a new way of delivering the information our community so desperately need.”

Dwayne Wickham, dean of Morgan State University’s Global School of Journalism and Communications

DeWayne Wickham (Courtesy Photo)

“The mission of the American Black Press hasn’t changed much in its 192-year existence. It continues to be that of an advocate for racial equality, racial justice and the uplifting of the black race.

”The current social and digital media platforms, like the penny press was when Freedom’s Journal was first published in 1827, are delivery systems by which news and information are transmitted to people. Throughout history, purveyors of news and information had to master these delivery systems to reach an audience. And I expect the Afro American Newspapers will continue to do this.

“The greater challenge to the Afro American, and other black newspapers, is to maintain the ability to research and report news and information of importance to black folks in a timely fashion. They cannot be an empty vessel and survive for very long. While the challenge of hiring and retaining skilled journalists is not unique to the black-owned newspapers and their digital offshoots, it is a more critical concern for them because of their special mission. So, black newspapers must aggressively pursue black journalists to staff their newsrooms. And they have to continue to do the things that made them an indispensable part of black life in America for more than a century. They must faithfully tell the stories about black folks that most other news organizations underplay, or ignore. They must do more reporting, and less repeating of news.

“And most important, they must continue to speak truth to power.”

Tom Friedman’s Latest Column Proves That Capitalism Was a Mistake

In Tom we distrust. Photo: Sean Zanni/Patrick McMullan via Getty Image

Thomas Friedman is among the most successful political commentators in the world. A global readership devours his books on globalization. America’s premier newspaper prints his every reflection on current affairs. Event planners pay him more for a single speech than the median American household earns in a year. Awards committees shower him in prizes. Presidents seek his counsel.

And yet, there are still some Americans who can say that “we live in a meritocracy” with a straight face.

Forget Friedman’s past apologia for war crimes. Forget his praise of Russian autocracy, and the fresh prince of Riyadh (which is to say, forget “suck on this,” “keep rootin’ for Putin,” and “Arab Spring, Saudi style”). We need not cherry-pick from Friedman’s back catalogue to establish that he is living proof of a systematic market failure in the hot-take economy. An examination of his most recent column will suffice.

National Museum of African American Music Is Getting Closer to Opening In Nashville: Details

A museum, two decades in the making, centering on African-American musicians is finally getting close to opening its doors in downtown Nashville in the coming months. As the National Museum of African American Music inches closer to its $50 million funding goal and construction workers labor away to complete the permanent interactive space, H. Beecher Hicks, III, president and CEO of the NMAAM, is anticipating what’s to come.

The influence that Africans Americans have had throughout the history of American music will be chronicled throughout the space in five permanent and temporary exhibits, and a 200-seat theater. According to plans that were unveiled late last year in the Tennessean, the museum space will occupy 56,000 sq. feet and will include artifacts such as “a leopard-print dress once worn by Whitney Houston to Nat King Cole‘s argyle sweater.” The museum, first conceived of in 2002 and which has hosted events to honor the likes of Nile Rodgers, Patti LaBelle, Charlie Wilson and Kirk Franklin over the last several years, boasts Darius Rucker, CeCe Winans, Keb’Mo and India.Arie as national chairs.

According to Hicks, the permanent exhibits will take visitors from the influence of slavery on American music through present time. It will include “Wade in the Water,” a gallery on religious music that highlights the 1940s-1960s; “Crossroads,” an exhibit on blues and the Great Migration; “Love Supreme,” a gallery on the emergence of jazz; “One Nation Under a Groove,” an exhibit about R&B, funk, techno, disco, go-go and more from the 1960s-1990s/early 2000s; and “The Message,” a space dedicated to hip-hop from its early iterations to today.

Hicks says the museum has met about 75 percent of its fundraising goal and construction on the museum will be completed at the “very end” of 2019 with the museum slated to open either later this year or in early 2020. On Feb. 19, the museum announced it was $1 million closer to its goal thanks to a joint gift from the Regions Foundation and the Mike Curb Foundation.

Next week, the museum expects to release rates and information for members of the community who would like to become “founding members.”

As the museum finalizes its plans, Hicks spoke to Billboard about what to expect.

National Museum of African American Music

A rendering of the interior of the National Museum of African American Music.Courtesy Photo

Billboard: Why Nashville?

H. Beecher Hicks, III: Why not Nashville? Nashville really is America’s music city. We like to say that if you look at it from a little bit of a historical presence, Nashville and Tennessee are like the crossroads of American music. Really, it was born in the South and then at the end of slavery and the beginning of The Great Migration, when our grandparents began to migrate North, whether they were going to Detroit or New York or Los Angeles, they very possibly went through Tennessee. So they left breadcrumbs in Memphis and left breadcrumbs in Nashville and breadcrumbs in Johnson City. Tennessee really, in so many ways, is kind of the crucible center of American music, even though in more modern times it’s been more prominent in other cities. We’re just bringing it back home.

What will the first temporary exhibit be about?

It will be on the Fisk Jubilee Singers and their impact on funding for [Historically Black Colleges and Universities]. In particular, the chorus and glee clubs that are such an important part of the HBCU experience.

You’ve partnered with a few artists, such as Darius Rucker and India.Arie, to get this done. How important were those partnerships for the museum?

We certainly make lots of friends along the way. Like anything else that you’re creating, it’s the one-on-one relationships [that matter]. You kind of get together with folks to kind of see and tell the story. You help them understand what’s in it for them, what’s in it for the culture [and] what’s in it for the community.

Black music has touched every genre of American music. How do you decide what goes into this museum?

We’re very fortunate that we have a skilled staff and a really skilled group of consultants that are working with us. We started out going to ethnomusicologists and music scholars around the country several years ago and asking them to tell us their stories of the music that African Americans have the most impact on around the nation. That was sort of boiled down into a storyline. Then we brought on a senior scholar, a woman by the name of Dr. Portia Maultsby, who is [the lead ethnomusicologist at the museum]. We have since hired a staff of curators who are experts in their own right in blues, jazz and in public history.

H. Beecher Hicks II.Courtesy Photo

AHA News: Why Are Black Women at Higher Risk of Dying From Pregnancy Complications?