Washington Notebook: Florida voters give Trump slight thumbs-up

  • President Trump's chaotic first 100 days
    President Trump’s chaotic first 100 days
  • 100 days of Trump...How about 100 days of Sean Spicer
    100 days of Trump…How about 100 days of Sean Spicer
  • Trump orders accountability office at VA
    Trump orders accountability office at VA
  • President Trump signs executive order on offshore energy
    President Trump signs executive order on offshore energy
  • NRA eagerly awaits Trump appearance
    NRA eagerly awaits Trump appearance
  • Trump Team vows diplomatic pressure on North Korea
    Trump Team vows diplomatic pressure on North Korea
  • Trump orders investigation into aluminum imports
    Trump orders investigation into aluminum imports
  • Trump backs down from plan to scrap NAFTA
    Trump backs down from plan to scrap NAFTA
  • Trump may try to remove national monuments
    Trump may try to remove national monuments
  • Here’s what you need to know about Donald Trump’s tax plan
    Here’s what you need to know about Donald Trump’s tax plan
  • Trump aims to limit federal role in education
    Trump aims to limit federal role in education
  • Trump has 'no intention' to release tax returns
    Trump has ‘no intention’ to release tax returns
  • President Trump makes bold economic promises
    President Trump makes bold economic promises
  • Here is what Donald Trump may do to Obama's net neutrality laws
    Here is what Donald Trump may do to Obama’s net neutrality laws
  • Trump signs order on farming, vows to build wall
    Trump signs order on farming, vows to build wall
  • Ryan: GOP and Trump on 'Same Page' on Tax Reform
    Ryan: GOP and Trump on ‘Same Page’ on Tax Reform
  • Trump: 'We will confront anti-Semitism'
    Trump: ‘We will confront anti-Semitism’
  • Ivanka Trump defends dad at women's conference
    Ivanka Trump defends dad at women’s conference
  • Trump to meet with farmers to look for ways to boost rural America
    Trump to meet with farmers to look for ways to boost rural America
  • Ivanka Trump heads to Germany
    Ivanka Trump heads to Germany
  • The entire U.S. Senate was just invited to the White House
    The entire U.S. Senate was just invited to the White House
  • President Trump could ban laptops on flights from U.K. to U.S.
    President Trump could ban laptops on flights from U.K. to U.S.
  • Notable Trump tweets in his first 100 days
    Notable Trump tweets in his first 100 days
  • 'Never again.' President Trump's statement about the Holocaust
    ‘Never again.’ President Trump’s statement about the Holocaust
  • Head of investigation into Trump-Russia ties resigns
    Head of investigation into Trump-Russia ties resigns
  • The proposed border project could shut down the government
    The proposed border project could shut down the government
  • Trump phones record-breaking astronaut
    Trump phones record-breaking astronaut
  • Trump's immigration agency wants to kick 50K Haitians out of U.S.
    Trump’s immigration agency wants to kick 50K Haitians out of U.S.
  • Trump awards Purple Heart at military hospital
    Trump awards Purple Heart at military hospital
  • Pence: US to honor refugee deal with Australia
    Pence: US to honor refugee deal with Australia
  • How a single sentence President Trump made enraged South Korea
    How a single sentence President Trump made enraged South Korea
  • Trump sends condolences after deadly Paris attack
    Trump sends condolences after deadly Paris attack
  • Trump meets with Italian prime minister
    Trump meets with Italian prime minister
  • Trump talks health care at joint presser with Italian PM
    Trump talks health care at joint presser with Italian PM
  • We have Trump's 100 day report card
    We have Trump’s 100 day report card
  • Sarah Palin's 'great night at the White House'
    Sarah Palin’s ‘great night at the White House’
  • Trump details the letter he received from Bill Belichick
    Trump details the letter he received from Bill Belichick
  • Trump seeks investigations into steel imports
    Trump seeks investigations into steel imports
  • Gronk offers to help out Sean Spicer at the White House
    Gronk offers to help out Sean Spicer at the White House
  • Trump welcomes Super Bowl champs Patriots to White House
    Trump welcomes Super Bowl champs Patriots to White House
  • President Trump's approval ratings continue to struggle
    President Trump’s approval ratings continue to struggle
  • Trump received millions from energy companies
    Trump received millions from energy companies
  • In his own words: Trump changes course
    In his own words: Trump changes course
  • Trumps signs bill extending VA care
    Trumps signs bill extending VA care
  • President Trump might scrap Iran nuclear deal over terrorism
    President Trump might scrap Iran nuclear deal over terrorism
  • Trump signs order on high-skilled worker visas
    Trump signs order on high-skilled worker visas
  • Tracking Trump's trips to Florida
    Tracking Trump’s trips to Florida
  • The Justice Department wants more illegal immigration prosecutions
    The Justice Department wants more illegal immigration prosecutions
  • Raw: Pres. Trump tours Wisconsin Snap-On factory
    Raw: Pres. Trump tours Wisconsin Snap-On factory
  • WH: Visitor log rules no different under Trump
    WH: Visitor log rules no different under Trump
  • Trump family hosts thousands for Easter Egg Roll
    Trump family hosts thousands for Easter Egg Roll
  • The 2020 Trump campaign is spending big at Trump's businesses
    The 2020 Trump campaign is spending big at Trump’s businesses
  • How did President Trump spend Easter?
    How did President Trump spend Easter?
  • McMaster: Trump 'will take action' to halt any North Korean threat aga
    McMaster: Trump ‘will take action’ to halt any North Korean threat aga
  • Melania and Barron Trump reportedly moving to Washington this summer
    Melania and Barron Trump reportedly moving to Washington this summer
  • Trump uses obscure law to roll back Obama's legacy
    Trump uses obscure law to roll back Obama’s legacy
  • Raw: Thousands attend Tax Day rally in NYC
    Raw: Thousands attend Tax Day rally in NYC
  • Trump White House won't release their visitor logs
    Trump White House won’t release their visitor logs
  • North Korea blames Trump’s ‘aggressive’ tweets for rising tensions
    North Korea blames Trump’s ‘aggressive’ tweets for rising tensions
  • Neil Gorsuch sworn in as Supreme Court justice
    Neil Gorsuch sworn in as Supreme Court justice
  • 'Mother of all bombs' kills dozens of ISIS fighters in Afghanistan
    ‘Mother of all bombs’ kills dozens of ISIS fighters in Afghanistan
  • Trump adopts Obama-era economic policy, abandons campaign promises
    Trump adopts Obama-era economic policy, abandons campaign promises
  • Raw: Trump Arrives at Fla. Resort for Weekend
    Raw: Trump Arrives at Fla. Resort for Weekend
  • Trump and Chinese president shake hands in Fla.
    Trump and Chinese president shake hands in Fla.
  • Trump says Syria attack in 'vital' US interest
    Trump says Syria attack in ‘vital’ US interest
  • Trump administration drops order against anti-Trump Twitter account
    Trump administration drops order against anti-Trump Twitter account
  • Raw: Navy missiles launched at sea toward Syria
    Raw: Navy missiles launched at sea toward Syria
  • Gorsuch wins Senate approval
    Gorsuch wins Senate approval
  • Trump toughens talk on Syria after chemical attack
    Trump toughens talk on Syria after chemical attack
  • Trump defends Bill O'Reilly
    Trump defends Bill O’Reilly
  • Trump welcomes King of Jordan to White House
    Trump welcomes King of Jordan to White House
  • Bannon Removed From National Security Council
    Bannon Removed From National Security Council
  • Trump's approval rating falls to 35%
    Trump’s approval rating falls to 35%
  • Trump vows to cut regulations slowing building
    Trump vows to cut regulations slowing building
  • Trump previews China visit in White House town hall
    Trump previews China visit in White House town hall
  • Melania Trump's portrait released
    Melania Trump’s portrait released
  • Trump donates salary to National Park Service
    Trump donates salary to National Park Service
  • Reports: Jared Kushner makes unannounced trip to Iraq
    Reports: Jared Kushner makes unannounced trip to Iraq
  • Trump promises long friendship with el-Sisi
    Trump promises long friendship with el-Sisi
  • President Trump's latest Twitter storm goes after Clinton...again
    President Trump’s latest Twitter storm goes after Clinton…again
  • Trump slashes foreign aid in 'hard power' budget blueprint
    Trump slashes foreign aid in ‘hard power’ budget blueprint
  • Trump Slams NBC News, 'sleepy eyes' Chuck Todd over Russia stories
    Trump Slams NBC News, ‘sleepy eyes’ Chuck Todd over Russia stories
  • Trump leaves Oval Office before bill signing
    Trump leaves Oval Office before bill signing
  • Trump orders trade overhaul
    Trump orders trade overhaul
  • Attorney: Flynn wants immunity for testimony
    Attorney: Flynn wants immunity for testimony
  • Trump’s Air Force Secretary nominee under fire about consulting
    Trump’s Air Force Secretary nominee under fire about consulting
  • President Trump threatens war on House Freedom Caucus
    President Trump threatens war on House Freedom Caucus
  • Trump's U.S. ambassador to Israel sworn in
    Trump’s U.S. ambassador to Israel sworn in
  • Trump properties tied to alleged Russian mobsters
    Trump properties tied to alleged Russian mobsters
  • Trump joked about Susan B. Anthony, Twitter wasn't pleased
    Trump joked about Susan B. Anthony, Twitter wasn’t pleased
  • Trump hosts senators, spouses at White House
    Trump hosts senators, spouses at White House
  • Ivanka Trump to become an official government employee
    Ivanka Trump to become an official government employee
  • Trump signs order making energy, not climate, a priority
    Trump signs order making energy, not climate, a priority
  • Trump claims presidential immunity from lawsuit
    Trump claims presidential immunity from lawsuit
  • White House staff will not attend White House Correspondents' dinner
    White House staff will not attend White House Correspondents’ dinner
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions wants to defund sanctuary cities
    Attorney General Jeff Sessions wants to defund sanctuary cities
  • Jared Kushner gets new White House role
    Jared Kushner gets new White House role
  • WH: Nothing 'Nefarious' About Kushner's Contacts
    WH: Nothing ‘Nefarious’ About Kushner’s Contacts
  • Ivanka Trump will attend women’s economic summit in Berlin
    Ivanka Trump will attend women’s economic summit in Berlin
  • Trump's wiretapping claim just got more complicated
    Trump’s wiretapping claim just got more complicated
  • Trump: Empowering women a priority
    Trump: Empowering women a priority
  • GOP health care vote pulled at last minute
    GOP health care vote pulled at last minute
  • Trump meets with Congressional Black Caucus
    Trump meets with Congressional Black Caucus
  • WH: Intel chair to brief Trump on 'monitoring'
    WH: Intel chair to brief Trump on ‘monitoring’
  • Trump’s initial reaction to attack near U.K. Parliament
    Trump’s initial reaction to attack near U.K. Parliament
  • Trump's former manager Paul Manafort reportedly pitched plan to benefit Vladimir Putin
    Trump’s former manager Paul Manafort reportedly pitched plan to benefit Vladimir Putin
  • Rex Tillerson says he 'didn't want' secretary of state job
    Rex Tillerson says he ‘didn’t want’ secretary of state job
  • Trump thinks America doesn't know Abraham Lincoln was Republican
    Trump thinks America doesn’t know Abraham Lincoln was Republican
  • No salary, no title, but Ivanka Trump getting a West Wing office
    No salary, no title, but Ivanka Trump getting a West Wing office
  • Trump takes jabs at Colin Kaepernick
    Trump takes jabs at Colin Kaepernick
  • Trump Goes to Ky. for Support on Healthcare Bill
    Trump Goes to Ky. for Support on Healthcare Bill
  • President Trump's approval rating hits new low
    President Trump’s approval rating hits new low
  • Trump meets with Iraq's prime minister
    Trump meets with Iraq’s prime minister
  • President Trump slams intelligence agencies over Russia
    President Trump slams intelligence agencies over Russia
  • White House vows to appeal 'flawed' travel ban ruling
    White House vows to appeal ‘flawed’ travel ban ruling
  • Mnuchin Downplays Divisions at G20 Meeting
    Mnuchin Downplays Divisions at G20 Meeting
  • Trump and Merkel meet in the Oval Office
    Trump and Merkel meet in the Oval Office
  • Trump supports NATO as long as allies pay their fair share
    Trump supports NATO as long as allies pay their fair share
  • Meals on Wheels not specifically identified in Trump's budget
    Meals on Wheels not specifically identified in Trump’s budget
  • Trump: '100 Percent Behind' Health Bill
    Trump: ‘100 Percent Behind’ Health Bill
  • Trump's second travel ban blocked by judge
    Trump’s second travel ban blocked by judge
  • Sean Spicer comments on wiretapping allegations
    Sean Spicer comments on wiretapping allegations
  • Irish PM gives strong immigration message next to Trump
    Irish PM gives strong immigration message next to Trump
  • 'Weak': Trump unhappy with judge's travel ban block
    ‘Weak’: Trump unhappy with judge’s travel ban block
  • Portion of Trump's tax returns released by MSNBC
    Portion of Trump’s tax returns released by MSNBC
  • Donald Trump lashes out at Snoop Dogg's controversial music video
    Donald Trump lashes out at Snoop Dogg’s controversial music video
  • Trump meets with Saudi Deputy Crown Prince
    Trump meets with Saudi Deputy Crown Prince
  • Trump gives CIA expanded authority over drone strikes
    Trump gives CIA expanded authority over drone strikes
  • Trump signs order to streamline executive branch
    Trump signs order to streamline executive branch
  • Trump holds first cabinet meeting, eyeing storm
    Trump holds first cabinet meeting, eyeing storm
  • President Trump to donate salary at the end of the year
    President Trump to donate salary at the end of the year
  • Trump Holds Health Care Listening Session
    Trump Holds Health Care Listening Session
  • 'Troubled Person' Arrested at White House
    ‘Troubled Person’ Arrested at White House
  • WH Press Secretary talks wiretap investigation
    WH Press Secretary talks wiretap investigation
  • Trump: Must Act Now To Stop 'Obamacare Disaster'
    Trump: Must Act Now To Stop ‘Obamacare Disaster’
  • Trump Pledges Help for Community Bankers
    Trump Pledges Help for Community Bankers
  • Spicer: Assange 'undermined' nat'l security
    Spicer: Assange ‘undermined’ nat’l security
  • Tweet and delete? Congress warns Trump he could be breaking the law
    Tweet and delete? Congress warns Trump he could be breaking the law
  • Crowds rally outside White House for women's rights
    Crowds rally outside White House for women’s rights
  • Hawaii sues US over new Trump travel ban
    Hawaii sues US over new Trump travel ban
  • Trump warns of 'bloodbath' for GOP if Obamacare survives
    Trump warns of ‘bloodbath’ for GOP if Obamacare survives
  • Trump: 'Proud' to support house health care bill
    Trump: ‘Proud’ to support house health care bill
  • Trump campaign aide Page was given permission for Moscow trip
    Trump campaign aide Page was given permission for Moscow trip
  • President Trump surprises schoolchildren during White House tour
    President Trump surprises schoolchildren during White House tour
  • Trump slams Obama with false claim on Gitmo detainees
    Trump slams Obama with false claim on Gitmo detainees
  • Fact Check: President Trump accused Obama of releasing Gitmo prisoners
    Fact Check: President Trump accused Obama of releasing Gitmo prisoners
  • Trump surprises White House tourists
    Trump surprises White House tourists
  • Trump administration introduces new travel ban
    Trump administration introduces new travel ban
  • Trump tweets Obama wiretapped him before election
    Trump tweets Obama wiretapped him before election
  • What Trump's new travel ban looks like
    What Trump’s new travel ban looks like
  • Trump tours private school in Florida
    Trump tours private school in Florida
  • Trump wants an investigation of Chuck Schumer
    Trump wants an investigation of Chuck Schumer
  • Carson, Perry sworn in for Housing, Energy posts
    Carson, Perry sworn in for Housing, Energy posts
  • President Trump says ‘it’s time for Americans to get off of welfare’
    President Trump says ‘it’s time for Americans to get off of welfare’
  • Jeff Sessions denies allegations of ties to Russia
    Jeff Sessions denies allegations of ties to Russia
  • Aboard $12.9B Warship, Trump Praises US Navy
    Aboard $12.9B Warship, Trump Praises US Navy
  • Trump to military: We will win again
    Trump to military: We will win again
  • Trump: My job is not to represent the world
    Trump: My job is not to represent the world
  • Trump touts first month accomplishments
    Trump touts first month accomplishments
  • Trump: 'Obligation Is to Serve' US Citizens
    Trump: ‘Obligation Is to Serve’ US Citizens
  • Trump begins speech 'condemning hate'
    Trump begins speech ‘condemning hate’
  • Trump signs wide-ranging bills, executive orders
    Trump signs wide-ranging bills, executive orders
  • President Trump gets honest about grading himself
    President Trump gets honest about grading himself
  • Trump's military spending (and cuts to the arts) in context
    Trump’s military spending (and cuts to the arts) in context
  • Congressional Republicans protect Trump's tax returns
    Congressional Republicans protect Trump’s tax returns
  • Wilbur Ross Sworn In as Commerce Secretary
    Wilbur Ross Sworn In as Commerce Secretary
  • Trump blames Obama for White House leaks
    Trump blames Obama for White House leaks
  • Trump welcomes governors to the White House
    Trump welcomes governors to the White House
  • Trump to skip White House Correspondents' Dinner
    Trump to skip White House Correspondents’ Dinner
  • Trump calls media 'very dishonest people'
    Trump calls media ‘very dishonest people’
  • Trump slams FBI 'leakers' amid Russia investigation
    Trump slams FBI ‘leakers’ amid Russia investigation
  • Trump lifts Obama's transgender bathroom protections
    Trump lifts Obama’s transgender bathroom protections
  • Raw: Secretary Tillerson arrives in Mexico City
    Raw: Secretary Tillerson arrives in Mexico City
  • Trump urges fight against hatred, anti-Semitism
    Trump urges fight against hatred, anti-Semitism
  • White House details border, immigration measures
    White House details border, immigration measures
  • Trump Visits African American History Museum
    Trump Visits African American History Museum
  • President Trump names new national security adviser
    President Trump names new national security adviser
  • Trump's sanctuary city fight could hurt his infrastructure plans
    Trump’s sanctuary city fight could hurt his infrastructure plans
  • Trump to meet with Black Caucus after unorthodox back and forth
    Trump to meet with Black Caucus after unorthodox back and forth
  • Raw: Mattis Makes Surprise Visit to Baghdad
    Raw: Mattis Makes Surprise Visit to Baghdad
  • Trump restates campaign promises at Florida rally
    Trump restates campaign promises at Florida rally
  • Trump admits defeat on travel ban, plans new immigration order
    Trump admits defeat on travel ban, plans new immigration order
  • President Trump accuses news media of being 'out of control'
    President Trump accuses news media of being ‘out of control’
  • Trump rolls back regulations on coal
    Trump rolls back regulations on coal
  • Trump: Administration running like 'a fine-tuned machine'
    Trump: Administration running like ‘a fine-tuned machine’
  • President Trump gets a live fact-check during press briefing
    President Trump gets a live fact-check during press briefing
  • Trump Taps Alexander Acosta as New Labor Nominee
    Trump Taps Alexander Acosta as New Labor Nominee
  • Trump defends administration, bashes media
    Trump defends administration, bashes media
  • Trump slams intel officials, media over Flynn
    Trump slams intel officials, media over Flynn
  • Trump, Netanyahu hold joint press conference
    Trump, Netanyahu hold joint press conference
  • Trump's morning tweets were caffeinated
    Trump’s morning tweets were caffeinated
  • Trump Meets With Retailers. Discusses Tax Reform
    Trump Meets With Retailers. Discusses Tax Reform
  • Trump Secretary of VA and head of SBA sworn in
    Trump Secretary of VA and head of SBA sworn in
  • Michael Flynn resigns as national security adviser
    Michael Flynn resigns as national security adviser
  • White House shares wrong versions of executive orders
    White House shares wrong versions of executive orders
  • Steven Mnuchin sworn in as Treasury secretary
    Steven Mnuchin sworn in as Treasury secretary
  • David Shulkin confirmed as Veterans Affairs secretary
    David Shulkin confirmed as Veterans Affairs secretary
  • Trump and Trudeau start Oval Office meeting
    Trump and Trudeau start Oval Office meeting
  • President Trump faces foreign policy challenge after North Korea tests
    President Trump faces foreign policy challenge after North Korea tests
  • White House aide defends Conway's Nordstrom comment
    White House aide defends Conway’s Nordstrom comment
  • Raw: Trump, Abe Play a Round of Golf
    Raw: Trump, Abe Play a Round of Golf
  • Flynn denied discussing sanctions with Russia, new reports say he did
    Flynn denied discussing sanctions with Russia, new reports say he did
  • Appeals court enforces suspension of Trump's travel ban
    Appeals court enforces suspension of Trump’s travel ban
  • Senate approves Tom Price for HHS secretary
    Senate approves Tom Price for HHS secretary
  • Trump agrees to continue honoring 'One China' policy
    Trump agrees to continue honoring ‘One China’ policy
  • Trump signs criminal justice executive actions
    Trump signs criminal justice executive actions
  • Trump meets airline execs, hints at tax reform
    Trump meets airline execs, hints at tax reform
  • Jeff Sessions confirmed as attorney general
    Jeff Sessions confirmed as attorney general
  • Pence breaks tied DeVos confirmation vote
    Pence breaks tied DeVos confirmation vote
  • Appeals court to decide whether travel ban stays frozen
    Appeals court to decide whether travel ban stays frozen
  • Trump defends travel ban as 'common sense'
    Trump defends travel ban as ‘common sense’
  • President Trump publicly supports LA 2024 Olympic bid
    President Trump publicly supports LA 2024 Olympic bid
  • Trump holds White House meeting with sheriffs
    Trump holds White House meeting with sheriffs
  • Documents show Donald Trump still wields power over his businesses
    Documents show Donald Trump still wields power over his businesses
  • Donald Trump tells Bill O'Reilly he 'respects' Vladimir Putin
    Donald Trump tells Bill O’Reilly he ‘respects’ Vladimir Putin
  • Donald Trump fed up with leaks and blames 'Obama people'
    Donald Trump fed up with leaks and blames ‘Obama people’
  • Trump tells Pence to investigate voter registration
    Trump tells Pence to investigate voter registration
  • Trump administration vows to fight back as Judge blocks travel ban
    Trump administration vows to fight back as Judge blocks travel ban
  • State Department reverses the cancellation of 60,000 visas
    State Department reverses the cancellation of 60,000 visas
  • Trump signs executive orders that loosen financial regulations
    Trump signs executive orders that loosen financial regulations
  • Trump takes aim at Dodd-Frank financial overhaul
    Trump takes aim at Dodd-Frank financial overhaul
  • White House describes new sanctions on Iran
    White House describes new sanctions on Iran
  • Rex Tillerson Sworn in as Secretary of State
    Rex Tillerson Sworn in as Secretary of State
  • Trump makes unscheduled trip to honor fallen Navy SEAL
    Trump makes unscheduled trip to honor fallen Navy SEAL
  • Trump administration puts Iran 'on notice'
    Trump administration puts Iran ‘on notice’
  • Trump touts African American heritage at Black History Month celebration
    Trump touts African American heritage at Black History Month celebration
  • Trump backs 'nuclear option' in Supreme Court fight
    Trump backs ‘nuclear option’ in Supreme Court fight
  • President Trump: Neil Gorsuch is my Supreme Court nominee
    President Trump: Neil Gorsuch is my Supreme Court nominee
  • Elaine Chao sworn in as Transportation secretary
    Elaine Chao sworn in as Transportation secretary
  • Trump meets pharma CEOs with campaign promises in hand
    Trump meets pharma CEOs with campaign promises in hand
  • Trump administration putting 'Iran on notice'
    Trump administration putting ‘Iran on notice’
  • Trump replaces acting Director of Immigration Enforcement
    Trump replaces acting Director of Immigration Enforcement
  • Trump fires acting AG after defiance on immigration order
    Trump fires acting AG after defiance on immigration order
  • Donald Trump says he has decided on his Supreme Court nominee
    Donald Trump says he has decided on his Supreme Court nominee
  • Trump mocks Chuck Schumer's 'fake tears'
    Trump mocks Chuck Schumer’s ‘fake tears’
  • Trump signs executive order on regulations
    Trump signs executive order on regulations
  • Trump spoke with Trudeau on mosque attack
    Trump spoke with Trudeau on mosque attack
  • Steve Bannon's White House role just got bigger
    Steve Bannon’s White House role just got bigger
  • Donald Trump immigration ban loses first legal battle
    Donald Trump immigration ban loses first legal battle
  • Part of Trump's ethics order might look familiar
    Part of Trump’s ethics order might look familiar
  • White House: Green Card Holders Won't Be Subject to Immigration Order
    White House: Green Card Holders Won’t Be Subject to Immigration Order
  • Judge blocks removal of immigrants under Trump's executive order
    Judge blocks removal of immigrants under Trump’s executive order
  • There are some exceptions to Trump's executive order on refugees
    There are some exceptions to Trump’s executive order on refugees
  • Trump says refugee crackdown 'not a Muslim ban'
    Trump says refugee crackdown ‘not a Muslim ban’
  • First Phone Conversation Between Trump, Putin
    First Phone Conversation Between Trump, Putin
  • President Trump's weekly address from the White House
    President Trump’s weekly address from the White House
  • Trump signs two executive actions to end first week
    Trump signs two executive actions to end first week
  • Pence at March for Life: 'Life is winning again'
    Pence at March for Life: ‘Life is winning again’
  • Trump signs executive order on Mexico wall
    Trump signs executive order on Mexico wall
  • Trump promises Homeland Security changes
    Trump promises Homeland Security changes
  • Trump reportedly issues gag orders for several Federal agencies
    Trump reportedly issues gag orders for several Federal agencies
  • Senate Approves Haley as US Ambassador to UN
    Senate Approves Haley as US Ambassador to UN
  • President Trump keeps James Comey as FBI Director
    President Trump keeps James Comey as FBI Director
  • Trump will announce Supreme Court pick next week
    Trump will announce Supreme Court pick next week
  • Trump signs executive order on oil pipelines
    Trump signs executive order on oil pipelines
  • Trump's Spanish version of White House website removed
    Trump’s Spanish version of White House website removed
  • Trump Meets auto executives at White House
    Trump Meets auto executives at White House
  • President Trump continues claim 'illegals' cost him popular vote
    President Trump continues claim ‘illegals’ cost him popular vote
  • Trump signs 3 executive orders, pulls out of TPP
    Trump signs 3 executive orders, pulls out of TPP
  • Trump resigned from business before taking office
    Trump resigned from business before taking office
  • Raw: Trump meets with congressional leaders
    Raw: Trump meets with congressional leaders
  • Trump's press secretary: Intention is 'never to lie to you'
    Trump’s press secretary: Intention is ‘never to lie to you’
  • Donald Trump Just Took His First Steps on ‘America First’
    Donald Trump Just Took His First Steps on ‘America First’
  • Donald Trump Meets with Business Leaders
    Donald Trump Meets with Business Leaders

WASHINGTON – National polls consistently show that more Americans disapprove of the job Donald Trump is doing than give him a thumbs-up.

But a new survey of Floridians likely to vote in the 2018 midterm elections finds that the president remains above water in the Sunshine State, with 45 percent having a favorable view and 41 percent giving him a thumbs-down.

More: Grading the President: Donald Trump’s 100 days report card

The poll was released last week by Firehouse Strategies, a Washington-based public affairs consultant firm started by former campaign staffers of Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.

They hired the data firm Optimus to gauge voter views on Trump’s job performance in four states he won narrowly in November: Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

The poll found that 44 percent of those asked across the four states have a favorable view of Trump, compared with 42 percent who don’t.

Ohio voters joined Florida voters in giving Trump a net positive view, and Wisconsin voters gave him a thumbs-down. Pennsylvania voters were evenly split, with 45 percent approving of his job performance and 45 percent not.

Some key findings from the 1,305 Floridians — Democrats, Republicans and independents — surveyed (numbers may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding):

» Only 1 in 5 believes Trump never lies or exaggerates the truth. The rest think he exaggerates the truth either “with good intent” (38 percent) or lies (43 percent).

» Slightly more Floridians (37 percent) say Trump’s first 100 days have been successful compared with 35 percent who disagree. About 28 percent say it’s too early to tell.

» A clear plurality (44 percent) would blame congressional Democrats if the lack of a budget deal leads to a government shutdown. The rest would point the finger at the president (31 percent) or congressional Republicans (26 percent).

This is ostensibly good news for Gov. Rick Scott, who is widely expected to announce next year that he’ll challenge Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson, who is seeking a fourth term.

Scott, a close Trump ally, will benefit if Florida voters have a favorable view of the president. In addition, Nelson could be hurt if a large portion of his constituents believe Democrats are to blame if the government closes its doors.

More: 2017 legislative session

Florida lawmakers among most bipartisan in Congress

Florida sends some of the most bipartisan lawmakers to Capitol Hill — and some of the most partisan.

The latest yardstick from The Lugar Center and the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University that measures how well members reach across the aisle shows lawmakers from the Sunshine State ran the gamut during the 114th Congress, which includes 2015 and 2016.

Democrat Bill Nelson (20th out of 98 senators ranked) and Republican Marco Rubio (33rd) were both considered bipartisan as measured against their colleagues. In contrast, Republican Ted Cruz, of Texas, and independent Bernie Sanders, of Vermont, were labeled the two most partisan senators.

The Bipartisan Index measures how often a member of Congress introduced bills that succeeded in attracting co-sponsors from members of the other party, and how often they in turn co-sponsored a bill introduced from across the aisle.

Members are given a score (above a zero means you’re judged to be bipartisan) and then ranked against their peers.

On the House side, three Floridians were among the top 11 most bipartisan members of Congress out of 427 ranked: Republican Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (sixth), Democrat Gwen Graham (ninth) and Republican Carlos Curbelo (11th).

Other Floridians considered bipartisan (and their rank) were: Republican David Jolly (48th), Republican Tom Rooney (52nd), Republican Ander Crenshaw (63rd), Democrat Patrick Murphy (67th), Democrat Debbie Wasserman Schultz (76th), Democrat Lois Frankel (79th), Republican Gus Bilirakis (81st), Republican Curt Clawson (86th), Republican Vern Buchanan (92nd), Republican Ted Yoho, Republican Mario Diaz-Balart (124th) and Republican Rich Nugent (149th).

Floridians labeled partisan (and their rank) included: Republican Bill Posey (154th), Democrat Kathy Castor (164th), Republican Dennis Ross (168th), Democrat Alcee Hastings (252nd), Democrat Ted Deutch (268th), Republican Jeff Miller (291st), Republican Ron DeSantis (305th), Republican Dan Webster (326th), Republican John Mica (342nd), Democrat Corrine Brown (358th), Democrat Alan Grayson (363rd) and Democrat Frederica Wilson (377th).

Rubio, Warren want to stop trafficking

Under the heading “lawmakers share more in common than you might think” comes this tidbit: Conservative firebrand Marco Rubio and liberal icon Elizabeth Warren are teaming up on a Senate bill.

The Florida Republican (who ran for president last year) and the Massachusetts senator (who could run for president in 2020) are co-sponsoring the End Banking for Human Traffickers Act that would assist financial institutions in identifying and reporting instances of human trafficking. The idea, they said, is to prosecute offenders and protect victims.

“Human trafficking is a human rights violation that can happen in our own backyards without us even knowing it,” said Rubio, who has emerged as one of the Senate’s most passionate voices for human rights. “That’s why we must encourage the development and implementation of effective tools to detect and stop criminals from profiting from this heinous crime.”

“We have an obligation to end human trafficking to ensure that every person can live with freedom and dignity,” Warren said. “To stop this terrible crime, we need to cut off traffickers’ access to the banking system, and this bipartisan bill will give financial institutions and regulators better tools to do so.”

Human trafficking is considered a multibillion-dollar industry that is allowed to exist because banks process their profits but often don’t have the information or the know-how to stop them. The Rubio-Warren bill would direct federal banking regulators to work with law enforcement and financial institutions to combat the use of the financial system for human trafficking.

Contact Ledyard King at lking@gannett.com; Twitter: @ledgeking.

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Review: At Northwest African American Museum, works you’ll want to touch — but don’t

Step into the gallery at the Northwest African American Museum (NAAM) where “Daniel Minter: Carvings” is on display, and you may wonder: “Wait a minute. Where are the carvings?”

They’re hanging right in front of you, but they’re subtle. Rather than 3-D stand-alone sculptures, they’re colorfully painted bas-reliefs that served as illustrations for a children’s book by Evelyn Coleman titled “The Foot Warmer and the Crow.”

Reproductions of these pieces offer no clue that they’re anything but two-dimensional. But stand close to them, and you can see that the contours of their human and corvid characters are raised slightly from their backdrops. Minter’s paintwork enhances the three-dimensional effect to the point where you want to graze your fingers over their surfaces to see which illusions are paint-created and which are hewed with a chisel, even though a sign nearby warns you, “Absolutely no touching the art.”

EXHIBITION REVIEW

‘Daniel Minter: Carvings’

11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Thursdays, through Sept. 17. Northwest African American Museum, 2300 S. Massachusetts St., Seattle; $5-$7 (206-518-6000 or naamnw.org).

“The Foot Warmer and the Crow,” according to Publishers Weekly, is a tale of an enslaved man counseled by a clever crow on how to escape his master. Copyright restrictions mean none of the text from the book accompanies the artwork, so the viewer is left to guess the details of the plot. Still, the spirit of the tale comes through loud and clear in Minter’s acrylic-on-carved-panel paintings.

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Scenes of cotton-picking and a panicky encounter with a barking dog alternate with dream images. The enslaved man fantasizes about soaring into an orange sky filled with crows. Later, one of the birds raises his beak to offer advice to the would-be runaway. Minter’s compositions are buoyant, inventive and, in one where the slave serves as a “foot warmer” in his master’s bed, appropriately grotesque.

“The Foot Warmer and the Crow” is the highlight of the show. But it’s in good company with other children’s book illustrations, all color or black-and-white block prints by Minter, a Georgia-born African-American artist now living in Maine.

Minter makes especially striking use of compositional distortion. In one of his illustrations for a tale called “Bubber Goes to Heaven,” for instance, the left hand of an elderly angel in a business suit and fedora is magnified in scale to emphasize the small pair of wings he’s offering a new heavenly arrival.

In some cases, Minter’s linoleum blocks and even his preliminary pencil sketches are included to shed light on how he arrives at his final product. “Daniel Minter: Carvings,” whether exploring racially charged themes or something more folkloric, offers visual delights.

Down the hall from the show is “Spirit of Nature,” a small display of paintings by Earline Alston running through May 28 that’s also well worth investigating. Alston has a most unusual story behind her. It was only after she was recovering from brain surgery in 2014 that she developed an interest in creating visual art. But you’d never know that from looking at her work.

Using chalk pastel, oil pastel, ink and watercolors infused with acrylic, she conjures landscapes that read like allegories. In “A Greater Force of Nature,” a mountain seems to grow directly out of the treetops in the foreground. In “A Time to Blossom,” Alston combines both a close-up and a longshot of cherries in bloom. In other paintings, tree branches seem to detach from their trunks and engage in an airborne colloquy. The results are simultaneously naturalistic and stylized, reality-rooted and ethereal.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Turner Prize: Black painting pioneers break award age barrier

Lubaina HimidImage copyright Edmund Blok
Image caption Lubaina Himid was made an MBE in 2010

A 62-year-old veteran of Britain’s black art scene, Lubaina Himid, is in the running for the Turner Prize after organisers scrapped its age limit.

British art’s most high-profile award has abolished its ban on over-50s this year – meaning Himid is eligible.

At 52, Hurvin Anderson, another key black British artist, is among the other nominees for the £25,000 prize.

The multicultural shortlist is completed by German-born Andrea Buttner and Londoner Rosalind Nashashibi.

The prize was the domain of Young British Artists in the 1990s – but the youngest person on the Turner shortlist this year is Nashashibi at 43.

The winner will be announced at the Ferens gallery in Hull on 5 December.

The Turner Prize was founded in 1984 and was open to all ages until 1991, when organisers limited it to artists under 50.

Image copyright Vanley Burke
Image caption Hurvin Anderson is nominated for exhibitions in Nottingham and Ontario

Analysis – BBC arts editor Will Gompertz

Lubaina Himid is likely to get the headlines, although probably not for her powerful, indignant images. It’ll be her age that causes a stir. This is the first year the age restriction of 50 years old or under has been removed from the qualifying conditions for the prize.

She is not the only seasoned artist on the list. In fact, all of those shortlisted are comfortably middle-aged.

It is also the most international feeling list for this national prize. Each of the four artists has strong links with cultures and counties beyond the UK, which reflects the globalised nature of the art world and the real world.

Frankly, age and origin matter not a bit. What’s important is whether or not they are any good, and do they – as the Turner Prize demands – represent developments in contemporary art? My answer would be firm “yes” to the former, and a more equivocal “not really” to the latter.

From a medium point of view, the list has a rather old-school feel about it, with two painters, a film-maker and a woodcutter – all of whom are making good work which I’m looking forward to seeing in what could be a memorable group show.

Find out more about the nominees:

Hurvin Anderson

Image copyright Hurvin Anderson

One of Britain’s leading contemporary painters, Anderson takes inspiration from his youth in Birmingham’s African-Caribbean community and visits to Trinidad. Barber shops feature regularly – they are places where he says both cultures meet.

He’s nominated for exhibitions in Nottingham and Ontario, Canada. The centrepiece of the Nottingham exhibition was a painting titled Is It Okay To Be Black? – a half-remembered view of a barber shop’s wall featuring Martin Luther King and Malcolm X.

The Tate judges described him as “an outstanding British painter whose art speaks to our current political moment with questions about identity and belonging”.

Andrea Buttner

Image copyright Brian Forrest

Buttner’s works have included a video of nuns who work in a funfair in Italy and woodcuts of faceless beggars.

She is interested in poverty, religion and shame. The judges said she highlights the “overlooked and undervalued”, and were impressed with the wide range of media used – including “unfashionable” formats like woodcuts and glass painting.

Her materials range from plywood – for woodcuts featuring simple, lonely figures – to fabric from workers’ uniforms and high-visibility jackets.

The jury also “noted Buttner’s unique approach to collaboration and her exploration of religion, morality and ethics”. The 45-year-old is based in London and Berlin, and is shortlisted for exhibitions in Switzerland and Los Angeles.

Lubaina Himid

Image copyright Stuart Whipps

Described by The Daily Telegraph as “the under-appreciated hero of black British art”, Himid made her name in the 1980s as one of the leaders of the British black arts movement – both painting and curating exhibitions of similarly overlooked black female artists.

The Zanzibar-born, Preston-based artist is now professor of contemporary art at the University of Central Lancashire and was made an MBE in 2010.

She’s nominated for solo shows in Bristol and Oxford. The Bristol show centred on larger-than-life cut-outs of 100 colourful figures – 17th Century African slave servants brought to Europe. Another work, Cotton.com, imagined conversations between the cotton workers of Lancashire and the slaves of South Carolina.

The Turner Prize judges praised her for “addressing pertinent questions of personal and political identity”.

Rosalind Nashashibi

Image copyright Rosalnind Nashashibi

Fourteen years after she won the £24,000 Beck’s Futures Prize, film artist and painter Nashashibi is nominated for the Turner.

Nashashibi was born in Croydon, south London, to Irish-Palestinian parents and studied at the Glasgow School of Art. She is nominated for an exhibition in California that included the film Electrical Gaza, which used live footage and animation to investigate everyday life in Gaza.

She’s also nominated for her contribution to the Documenta 14 exhibition in Athens, including a film about mother-and-daughter artists in self-imposed exile in Guatemala.

The jury said they were impressed by the “depth and maturity” of her work, which “often examines sites of human occupation and the coded relationships that occur within those spaces”.

The exhibition of work by this year’s shortlisted artists runs at the Ferens gallery in Hull – the UK’s City of Culture for 2017 – from 26 September to 7 January.

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RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Turner Prize: Black painting pioneers edge out young British artists

Lubaina HimidImage copyright Edmund Blok
Image caption Lubaina Himid was made an MBE in 2010

A 62-year-old veteran of Britain’s black art scene, Lubaina Himid, is in the running for the Turner Prize after organisers scrapped its age limit.

British art’s most high-profile award has abolished its ban on over-50s this year – meaning Himid is eligible.

At 52, Hurvin Anderson, another key black British artist, is among the other nominees for the £25,000 prize.

The multicultural shortlist is completed by German-born Andrea Buttner and Londoner Rosalind Nashashibi.

The prize was the domain of Young British Artists in the 1990s – but the youngest person on the Turner shortlist this year is Nashashibi at 43.

The winner will be announced at the Ferens gallery in Hull on 5 December.

The Turner Prize was founded in 1984 and was open to all ages until 1991, when organisers limited it to artists under 50.

Image copyright Vanley Burke
Image caption Hurvin Anderson is nominated for exhibitions in Nottingham and Ontario

Analysis – BBC arts editor Will Gompertz

Lubaina Himid is likely to get the headlines, although probably not for her powerful, indignant images. It’ll be her age that causes a stir. This is the first year the age restriction of 50 years old or under has been removed from the qualifying conditions for the prize.

She is not the only seasoned artist on the list. In fact, all of those shortlisted are comfortably middle-aged.

It is also the most international feeling list for this national prize. Each of the four artists has strong links with cultures and counties beyond the UK, which reflects the globalised nature of the art world and the real world.

Frankly, age and origin matter not a bit. What’s important is whether or not they are any good, and do they – as the Turner Prize demands – represent developments in contemporary art? My answer would be firm “yes” to the former, and a more equivocal “not really” to the latter.

From a medium point of view, the list has a rather old-school feel about it, with two painters, a film-maker and a woodcutter – all of whom are making good work which I’m looking forward to seeing in what could be a memorable group show.

Find out more about the nominees:

Hurvin Anderson

Image copyright Hurvin Anderson

One of Britain’s leading contemporary painters, Anderson takes inspiration from his youth in Birmingham’s African-Caribbean community and visits to Trinidad. Barber shops feature regularly – they are places where he says both cultures meet.

He’s nominated for exhibitions in Nottingham and Ontario, Canada. The centrepiece of the Nottingham exhibition was a painting titled Is It Okay To Be Black? – a half-remembered view of a barber shop’s wall featuring Martin Luther King and Malcolm X.

The Tate judges described him as “an outstanding British painter whose art speaks to our current political moment with questions about identity and belonging”.

Andrea Buttner

Image copyright Brian Forrest

Buttner’s works have included a video of nuns who work in a funfair in Italy and woodcuts of faceless beggars.

She is interested in poverty, religion and shame. The judges said she highlights the “overlooked and undervalued”, and were impressed with the wide range of media used – including “unfashionable” formats like woodcuts and glass painting.

Her materials range from plywood – for woodcuts featuring simple, lonely figures – to fabric from workers’ uniforms and high-visibility jackets.

The jury also “noted Buttner’s unique approach to collaboration and her exploration of religion, morality and ethics”. The 45-year-old is based in London and Berlin, and is shortlisted for exhibitions in Switzerland and Los Angeles.

Lubaina Himid

Image copyright Stuart Whipps

Described by The Daily Telegraph as “the under-appreciated hero of black British art”, Himid made her name in the 1980s as one of the leaders of the British black arts movement – both painting and curating exhibitions of similarly overlooked black female artists.

The Zanzibar-born, Preston-based artist is now professor of contemporary art at the University of Central Lancashire and was made an MBE in 2010.

She’s nominated for solo shows in Bristol and Oxford. The Bristol show centred on larger-than-life cut-outs of 100 colourful figures – 17th Century African slave servants brought to Europe. Another work, Cotton.com, imagined conversations between the cotton workers of Lancashire and the slaves of South Carolina.

The Turner Prize judges praised her for “addressing pertinent questions of personal and political identity”.

Rosalind Nashashibi

Image copyright Rosalnind Nashashibi

Fourteen years after she won the £24,000 Beck’s Futures Prize, film artist and painter Nashashibi is nominated for the Turner.

Nashashibi was born in Croydon, south London, to Irish-Palestinian parents and studied at the Glasgow School of Art. She is nominated for an exhibition in California that included the film Electrical Gaza, which used live footage and animation to investigate everyday life in Gaza.

She’s also nominated for her contribution to the Documenta 14 exhibition in Athens, including a film about mother-and-daughter artists in self-imposed exile in Guatemala.

The jury said they were impressed by the “depth and maturity” of her work, which “often examines sites of human occupation and the coded relationships that occur within those spaces”.

The exhibition of work by this year’s shortlisted artists runs at the Ferens gallery in Hull – the UK’s City of Culture for 2017 – from 26 September to 7 January.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email .

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

In Parkdale, a black artists’ network finds its way home

It’s the afternoon before the evening opening of BAND’s exhibition for the Contact Festival, and Karen Carter is busying herself with a scraggly shrub crowding the building’s back door. “I need all of this gone,” she tells a hardhatted landscaper, surveying a patch of weedy grass. “I need space for people to mingle and move around.”

While it might seem an overly domestic concern for the board chair of a bona fide burgeoning cultural organization — BAND (Black Artists’ Network in Dialogue), not quite a decade old, has quickly become a hub of African-Canadian culture here — it’s one that Carter relishes. Less than a year ago, this would have seemed like a distant fantasy scenario: An opening, in time for Contact, in a building BAND owns itself.

Its $800,000 price tag (it carries a small, more-than-manageable mortgage) is a capital-cost fever dream for virtually any independent cultural organization, and it’s the product of a stranger-than-fiction tale. To get here, BAND stared down homelessness twice, endured constant offhand discrimination at the hands of prospective landlords, and almost gave up entirely before a perfect storm of fate, a beneficent bank, and improbably, Toronto’s inflated property market delivered them to a solid place to stand.

“I just kept telling myself: ‘Happy place, happy place,’ ” laughed Carter late last week, as she helped prep BAND’s new HQ, a slim Victorian house on Brock St. in Parkdale — painted top to bottom in inky black — for opening night. “Our conundrum was, if we couldn’t solve the space issue, we might just be done. We weren’t prepared to be one of those organizations that would pop up here and there. We wanted to be an anchor, so people could rely on us. That’s how you make connections, and connect to the bigger world.”

Its new show, Ears, Eyes, Voice: Black Canadian Photojournalists 1970s-1990s — featuring, this Sunday, four such photographers discussing their work — is an emblematic gesture, BAND shoring up its past to more solidly build its future. Less than a year ago, that seemed an unlikely goal at best. BAND was on the brink of homelessness for the second time in its brief history, and slipping towards a bleak property market where even the most decrepit options were likely out of its reach.

It wasn’t supposed to end that way. Last spring, BAND was settling in to the upper two floors of an old Scotiabank building at the corner of Queen St. W. and Lansdowne Ave. It had arrived to the derelict space two years before, and had put countless hours into its restoration.

It was sweat equity invested alongside the bank’s largesse: After years of wandering the wilderness of Toronto’s commercial rental property market, Scotia had set BAND up on those two floors with a 10-year lease. The cost, at $1 per year, spelled salvation for a nascent cultural organization trying to find its feet.

“We had a handful of buildings with vacant spaces that we gifted to charities (rent free),” said John Doig, Scotiabank’s executive vice-president of marketing, who at the time was responsible for branches in the city. “I liked the idea of having a gallery above the bank, and we liked what BAND was doing.”

BAND inaugurated its new space with an exhibition of the famed African-American photographer Gordon Parks for Contact, giving it profile; it followed Parks with celebrated black photographers Vanley Burke and James Barnor.

But in 2016, a top-level decision by the bank to divest most of its real-estate assets put BAND’s position suddenly in doubt. The building went up for sale, and BAND was back in an uncomfortably familiar spot. The group had spent two years on the street when its last building became too costly, and Carter wasn’t willing to let it happen again. “It was the typical story: Artists come in, make it better, and have to leave,” Carter said. “We just decided we weren’t leaving without getting something for it.”

They asked Scotia to run two sale-price scenarios: One in which the new owner would have to take on BAND as a tenant for the next 8 years, at their $1 rate (it was a formal lease, legally protected), and one where BAND would willingly vacate, for a price.

“It doesn’t take much to realize there’s not much of a business case for a new owner to take on a building where two-thirds of its space is being rented for a dollar a year,” said Doig. So BAND agreed to go, for a price. The building eventual sold for $4.25 million, and Doig helped negotiate a buyout of the remaining eight years of BAND’s lease at market price (Scotia declined to give the amount, but the new building’s purchase price of $800,000, now owned with a small mortgage and a pool of cash BAND uses for programming, gives a decent clue).

To be on solid ground in a city growing increasingly infamous for an affordability crisis (artists are leaving the centre of the city in droves, either priced out or simply evicted; BAND’s peers in the culture sector sit on pins and needles, awaiting their next lease renewals) is a rare luxury, and one on which Yao Togobo, BAND’s director, hopes to capitalize.

“This is really the first permanent home black culture in Canada has had,” says Togobo. “I’d like for this to be the place where black artists of all kinds can feel comfortable, and plot and plan and move forward together.”

If it feels like a happy ending, Carter isn’t allowing herself to breathe easily. “You’ve got to be thinking legacy,” she said. “To do that, you can’t be house poor. You’ve always got to be building.”

A look back at BAND’s brief history is a lesson in determination. Hatched in 2009 by Carter, Maxine Bailey, Karen Tyrell and Julie Crooks, BAND started out holding events in such venues as Grano, the renowned Italian-bistro-turned-literary-hub in Davisville, or at the Arts and Letters Club on University Ave., an old-world bastion of the city’s cultural elite (“we loved infiltrating places we weren’t supposed to,” Carter said).

Inspired by Canadian Artists Network: Black Artists in Action, a group that dissolved in the late ’90s, BAND decided to go a step further. A bricks-and-mortar space would give their effort the permanence it needed to stick around, they reasoned; using it as a hub for the city’s black cultural community to reach out to the world would keep it relevant. (“This organization isn’t about a bunch of black people talking to each other,” Carter says. “It’s about pushing the culture out into the broader society.”)

In 2011, they found a storefront on Bloor St. W. near Christie Pits. The space was modest, but the price, at $1,200 a month, was right. The group started holding monthly shows, and began to blossom as a community hub.

Then their lease came due: Within a year, rent had doubled to more than $2,000. BAND chose to move on. The rental market, though tight, was not forbidding; suitable properties seemed plentiful. One of their advisers had warned them to expect barriers, an idea Carter wouldn’t let herself believe.

“ ‘Landlords don’t like artists,’ is what he told us, ‘and when you say black artists, they’re thinking hip-hop parties,’ ” she said. “And sure enough, every time we went to see a place we could afford, they wouldn’t rent it to us.”

After almost a year of looking, Carter was becoming desperate. A space near the city’s Junction neighbourhood had come free, and she started in to what she believed to be serious negotiations.

“Then the landlord started asking me all kinds of strange questions: ‘How many people come to an opening? Is there music? Is there alcohol?’ ” Carter said. “I explained: Yes, it’s an art opening, so we serve wine and cheese, and we might play some light jazz. And over the whole evening, not at the same time, we might have a couple of hundred people.”

Carter’s face tightens, and she pauses before she continues. “Then he looked at me and asked: ‘How many black people?’ ” she laughs. “I asked myself: ‘Do I want this racist moment to suck my soul dry, or do I just move on?’ I just took a deep breath, and I walked away.”

It was one of the many moments BAND could have simply evaporated, sucked dry by unrequited effort that felt more futile by the day. “We were at that point: Either we get help, or this dies,” Carter said.

Then, hope emerged. Carter had been speaking to Jane Nokes, the director of Scotiabank’s art collection. Carter’s story struck a chord. Nokes knew of the bank’s quiet practice of parcelling off vacant spaces to charities in need. She connected Carter to Doig, and the deal to take on the upper floors on Queen began to evolve. “For every idiot, inappropriate, racist moment you have, you have 10 people willing to step up,” Carter says.

It took one more bounce for BAND to find their way home, but this one is on ground more solid than they’d ever hoped. “I’m a firm believer that the good guy wins, eventually,” Doig says. “They’re in a place now that they can look forward long-term.”

Carter’s under no illusion that things get easy from here. But one worry — a big one — is off the table for good. “It’s lift as you climb,” she says. “You want to pull the next generation of people along too. But we finally have a home for them.”

Photojournalists Jules Elder, Eddie Grant, Diane Liverpool, and Al Peabody discuss their work in the exhibition Ears, Eyes, Voice at BAND, 19 Brock St., on April 30 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

For black Americans, life expectancy is four years below fellow whites

The CDC’s Vital Signs report found that blacks aged 35-64 are 50 per cent more likely to have high blood pressure than whites. — AFP picThe CDC’s Vital Signs report found that blacks aged 35-64 are 50 per cent more likely to have high blood pressure than whites. — AFP picMIAMI, May 3 — African-Americans have made gains in life expectancy but major disparities remain in the United States, where blacks can expect to live about four years fewer than whites, US researchers said yesterday.

In the past two decades, the gap in death rates between blacks and whites narrowed dramatically — going from 33 per cent in 1999 to 16 per cent in 2015, said the report by the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.

The death rate for blacks alone fell 25 per cent in that time period.

Despite these advances, younger black men still tend to die far younger than whites, according to the CDC report, describing this trend as a “concern.”

“Blacks in their 20s, 30s, and 40s are more likely to live with or die from conditions that typically occur at older ages in whites, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes,” said a CDC statement.

The CDC’s Vital Signs report found that blacks aged 35-64 are 50 per cent more likely to have high blood pressure than whites.

It also said blacks aged 18-49 are two times as likely to die from heart disease as whites.

Cancer was far more often a killer among African-Americans, who “have the highest death rate for all cancers combined compared with whites,” said the report.

Violence contributed to the gap, too, with blacks aged 18-34 nine times more likely than whites of the ame age to die from homicide.

“Notably, the death rates for homicide among blacks did not change over the 17 years of the study,” said the report.

Health causes

Advances have been made in treating heart disease, and the effect was apparent, particularly among older people.

“The racial death rate gap closed completely for deaths from heart disease and for all causes of death among those 65 years and older,” said the report.

Deaths from HIV have dropped dramatically since 1999, falling 80 per cent among blacks in the ages range of 18 to 49.

Still, blacks are seven to nine times more likely to die from HIV than whites, said the report.

“We have seen some remarkable improvements in death rates for the black population in these past 17 years,” said Leandris Liburd, associate director of CDC’s Office of Minority Health and Health Equity.

“Important gaps are narrowing due to improvements in the health of the black population overall. However, we still have a long way to go.”

In the only major developed country lacking national health care for all, the factors that contribute to the gap in life expectancy include poverty, lower educational attainment and home ownership among blacks.

“These risk factors may limit blacks’ access to prevention and treatment of disease,” said the report.

The data for the study came from the US Census Bureau, National Vital Statistics System, and CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. — AFP

Death Rates Fall for Blacks in the U.S. But Problems Remain

Death rates have fallen by 25 percent for African-Americans since 1999, but younger blacks are still dying far too young from diseases that shouldn’t kill them, government researchers said Tuesday.

There’s been a “dramatic” 80 percent drop in deaths from the AIDS virus HIV among blacks, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. And for African-Americans over the age of 65, there’s almost no difference in death rates compared to whites.

Image: A patient is monitored in an examination room inside the Clinical Decision Unit (CDU) at Kaiser Permanente's Capitol Hill Medical Center in Washington, DC. Image: A patient is monitored in an examination room inside the Clinical Decision Unit (CDU) at Kaiser Permanente's Capitol Hill Medical Center in Washington, DC.

A patient is monitored in an examination room inside the Clinical Decision Unit (CDU) at Kaiser Permanente’s Capitol Hill Medical Center in Washington, DC. Brooks Kraft / Corbis via Getty Images

But younger blacks are not doing so well, the CDC team found.

“Blacks in their 20s, 30s and 40s are dying from … heart disease and diabetes,” CDC epidemiologist Timothy Cunningham, who led the study, told reporters.

One problem is that the risk factors for stroke, diabetes and heart disease are silent. High blood pressure or clogged arteries rarely cause symptoms until there’s considerable damage.

Related: Minorities Have More Heart Disease Risk, Even When Thin

Another problem is getting health care in the first place. “Blacks aged 18-34 years were less likely to have a personal doctor or health care provider than whites,” Cunningham’s team wrote in the report.

Overall, blacks under the age of 65 have a 40 percent higher death rate than whites the same age. A black child born in 2014 can expect to live to be 75.6, compared to 79 for a white child born that year.

“At ages 18-34 years, blacks had higher death rates than whites for eight of the 10 leading causes of death among blacks in that age group (heart disease; cancer; cerebrovascular disease; diabetes mellitus; homicide; HIV disease; and conditions resulting from pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium (recovery from childbirth),” the team wrote.

“In addition, blacks have the highest death rate and shorter survival rate for all cancers combined compared with whites in the United States.”

Related: Are African-Americans Locked Out?

And blacks are far more likely than whites to be murdered. “Homicide is the seventh highest cause of death among blacks and has not decreased to any extent in the past 17 years,” Cunningham said. “In blacks 18 to 34, it remains the No. 1 cause of death.”

Young adult blacks are nine times more likely to die by homicide as whites the same age, the team found.

Part of the problem is behavior, the team noted. All Americans — black, white, Hispanic and Asian — need to eat healthier food and exercise more, CDC says. Blacks are more likely than whites to be overweight or obese and to get little or no physical exercise.

Related: Where You Live Determines What Kills You

But the problem goes beyond that. “Blacks had significantly lower educational attainment and home ownership and almost twice the proportion of households below the poverty level compared with whites across the life span,” the team wrote.

“We have to invest in places where people live to make healthier choices the easy choice,” Cunningham said. “Where we live determines our health. Where we live determines the quality of housing, determines the schools we go to,” he added.

The Gantt Report: The Black Political Clap Back

Untitled-1

By:  Lucius Gantt

     There are two major political parties in the United States. There are Republicans and there are Democrats.

     Twenty years ago, most, if not all, of America’s statewide and local elected officials were Democrats. There were so few Republicans in office in many communities, Grand Old Party (GOP) members could have held their caucus meetings in a phone booth!

     Today, it seems like Republican elected officials run everything. A Republican is in the White House,  Republicans are leaders in Congress of the House of Representatives and the Senate and the same is true in a whole lot of states, cities and counties!

     The Gantt Report wrote years ago that one reason for the change in political party dominance was the Republican party dominance in political science, political technology and political communications.

      People read about the demise of the party that African Americans love but they dismissed or denied it because the prediction of that demise came from a dark-skinned political writer.

      Well, political dominance is not the end. Winning elected offices is not the final political goal or purpose.

      Some Republicans in powerful positions have called for the “destruction of the state”. They want to reverse everything political. They want to change everything governmental and they want to destroy every political thing that people have ever wanted from government, such as health care, military security, civil rights, voting rights and so on.

     If Republicans in office are “ultra conservative” how do they try to influence American citizens to see things their way and support the terrible policies the ultra conservatives want to implement?

     They put a face on the opposition, a Black face!

     Many Republicans, especially many Republicans in Washington, D.C., will blame anything and everything that they can portray as bad, as negative or as undesirable on the N-word!

     This is wrong and enough is enough!

     When you have a President that is a political pretender that acts like he cares, that poses as your leader and is a habitual liar, you will have enormous political problems.

     If your insurance rates are too high, blame the Black President. If your intelligence agencies say people in the White House are political puppets of a foreign enemy and Congressional and law enforcement agencies begin investigations, you divert and distract the investigations by calling for investigations of the former National security Chief, another N-word. If an international military crisis pops up, again, blame the N-Word.

     The recalcitrant and reactionary political and community so-called leaders that you love are reluctant to say a mumbling word and the political party won’t step up their opposition to the many bad things that are said and done by people in power because they can’t. They don’t know how to respond.

     They also, perhaps, don’t want to offend the big money political contributors that are sought by both Democrats and Republicans.

     If the politicians that you voted for are afraid to comment about how the President of the United States constantly does wrongful things and puts the blame on the former President, Barack Obama, then I will do it.

     The Gantt Report is not afraid to “clap back”, so to speak!

      The idea, the practice and the habit of blaming crime, war, health care problems, educational problems, housing problems on Black people must be exposed, discredited, fought against and resisted!

     Stop being scared to stand up. Stop being scared to speak out!

     Stop being scared of biased, bigoted government leaders that surround themselves with closet klansmen, white supremacists, crooks, cronies and political yes men and yes women”!

      It is time for the Black political clap back! Barack Obama is no personal friend of mine but it is wrong to blame him for everything wrong in America and in the world! (Buy Gantt’s latest book, “Beast Too: Dead Man Writing” onAmazon.com and from bookstores everywhere. Contact Lucius at www.allworldconsultants.net. And, if you want to,“Like” The Gantt Report page on Facebook.)

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AKAs At American University Threatened With Bananas Hanging From Nooses

On Monday, bananas hanging on strings tied as nooses were found on American University‘s campus in Washington, D.C.

NBC Washington reports that the bananas had the letters “AKA” written on them which has led investigators and students to believe the threatening gesture was aimed at the Black sorority Alpha Kappa Alpha.

The hanging fruits were spotted on three different trees on campus and were soon posted on social media. They were also found on the same day that Student Government Association president Taylor Dumpson, a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha, started her new position. She is the first black woman in the role, so there’s your motive.

AU President Neil Kerwin released a statement in regards to the incident:

I regret this happened, apologize to everyone offended, and state emphatically that this incident does not reflect what American University truly is. While this incident targeted AU’s chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, and occurred after the first black woman and AKA member was sworn in as the Student Government president—our entire university community has been adversely affected by this cowardly, despicable act.

This comes less than a year after another African-American woman said that she had a banana thrown at her, as well as another rotten banana left at her dorm room door which also had obscene language written on it.

The hanging bananas are being treated as a hate crime.

Photo: Youtube Screenshot

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Death Rates Fall for U.S. Blacks

Death rates have fallen by 25 percent for African-Americans since 1999, but younger blacks are still dying far too young from diseases that shouldn’t kill them, government researchers said Tuesday.

There’s been a “dramatic” 80 percent drop in deaths from the AIDS virus HIV among blacks, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. And for African-Americans over the age of 65, there’s almost no difference in death rates compared to whites.

Image: A patient is monitored in an examination room inside the Clinical Decision Unit (CDU) at Kaiser Permanente's Capitol Hill Medical Center in Washington, DC. Image: A patient is monitored in an examination room inside the Clinical Decision Unit (CDU) at Kaiser Permanente's Capitol Hill Medical Center in Washington, DC.

A patient is monitored in an examination room inside the Clinical Decision Unit (CDU) at Kaiser Permanente’s Capitol Hill Medical Center in Washington, DC. Brooks Kraft / Corbis via Getty Images

But younger blacks are not doing so well, the CDC team found.

“Blacks in their 20s, 30s and 40s are dying from … heart disease and diabetes,” CDC epidemiologist Timothy Cunningham, who led the study, told reporters.

One problem is that the risk factors for stroke, diabetes and heart disease are silent. High blood pressure or clogged arteries rarely cause symptoms until there’s considerable damage.

Related: Minorities Have More Heart Disease Risk, Even When Thin

Another problem is getting health care in the first place. “Blacks aged 18-34 years were less likely to have a personal doctor or health care provider than whites,” Cunningham’s team wrote in the report.

Overall, blacks under the age of 65 have a 40 percent higher death rate than whites the same age. A black child born in 2014 can expect to live to be 75.6, compared to 79 for a white child born that year.

“At ages 18-34 years, blacks had higher death rates than whites for eight of the 10 leading causes of death among blacks in that age group (heart disease; cancer; cerebrovascular disease; diabetes mellitus; homicide; HIV disease; and conditions resulting from pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium (recovery from childbirth),” the team wrote.

“In addition, blacks have the highest death rate and shorter survival rate for all cancers combined compared with whites in the United States.”

Related: Are African-Americans Locked Out?

And blacks are far more likely than whites to be murdered. “Homicide is the seventh highest cause of death among blacks and has not decreased to any extent in the past 17 years,” Cunningham said. “In blacks 18 to 34, it remains the No. 1 cause of death.”

Young adult blacks are nine times more likely to die by homicide as whites the same age, the team found.

Part of the problem is behavior, the team noted. All Americans — black, white, Hispanic and Asian — need to eat healthier food and exercise more, CDC says. Blacks are more likely than whites to be overweight or obese and to get little or no physical exercise.

Related: Where You Live Determines What Kills You

But the problem goes beyond that. “Blacks had significantly lower educational attainment and home ownership and almost twice the proportion of households below the poverty level compared with whites across the life span,” the team wrote.

“We have to invest in places where people live to make healthier choices the easy choice,” Cunningham said. “Where we live determines our health. Where we live determines the quality of housing, determines the schools we go to,” he added.