How long will you live?

Where you live on Long Island can play a powerful role in how long you live, new statistics show. 

The number of years swings from 73.2 in North Bellport  to 92.9 on Shelter Island, according to life expectancy estimates for census tracts.   

In the United States, the average life lasts 78.6 years. Living the longest are the residents of Hawaii — 82 years. Mississippi has the lowest life expectancy: 74.9 years.

In New York, the life expectancy is 81 years, the third highest in the nation. New York City has the lowest and highest estimates of longevity nationwide: 59 years along the East River in North Roosevelt Island and 93.6 years in lower Manhattan.

On Long Island, as with other parts of the country, some of the starkest disparities turn up just miles apart, the research shows.

If you live in the western part of East Meadow, you have a good chance of making it to 85, the figures show. But cross Meadowbrook Parkway into Uniondale and your life expectancy drops to 73.5. In a West Babylon census tract, your average number of years is 83.6, but simply walking into Wyandanch cuts your life span to 77.4. The life span in a North Bellmore census tract averages 79.

The differences let Long Islanders take a look for the first time at life expectancy for their neighborhoods, according to The Associated Press, which analyzed data from nearly 66,000 census tracts nationwide. Each covers roughly 4,000 people.

The geographic lens shows how demographic variables — household income, education, employment, race and access to health care — affect longevity, said researchers, who chose the markers because of their high correlation with life expectancy.   

For a suburban policy expert at Hofstra University, the numbers reflect how the Island has become more diverse over the decades. 

“Almost without exception, the neighborhoods with the lowest life expectancy are the poorest and most minority,” said Lawrence Levy, who heads Hofstra’s National Center for Suburban Studies.

The factors

Being out of work has the biggest impact on life expectancy, and not in a good way, the analysis showed. Residents of neighborhoods that had an increase of 10 percentage points in the unemployment rate can expect to see their life expectancy drop by 18 months, according to the data.

The kind of work you do often is tied to how much education you have and determines how much money you make, research has shown. Your job also is key to whether you have access to health insurance or can afford medical care. 

In the analysis, Americans who have higher incomes live longer: A $10,000 increase in median income translates to an extra six months of life.

“Income is a major factor,” said Martin R. Cantor, who heads the Long Island Center for Socio-Economic Policy.

Earning less money can mean not going to the doctor or not going as often as you should. A 10 percent increase in uninsured residents translates to a loss of six months, according to the data.

Less schooling means a shorter life, too. Those who don’t graduate from high school, for example, lose 10 months,  the figures show.

Finally, your race also factors into your life span.  A neighborhood with a larger percentage of black residents can have a lower life expectancy because African-Americans historically have had a lower life expectancy than whites. In 2011, for instance, white men nationwide had a life expectancy of 76.6 years while black men had an average life span of 72.2 years, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Shelter Island epitomizes the influence of demographic variables.

The  4-mile-by-5-mile slice of Suffolk County has a median income of $94,000. What money can buy abounds: pricey homes and luxury automobiles.The unemployment rate stands at just above 2 percent.

Nearly everyone — 99 percent  — is at least a high school graduate. Nine out of 10 residents are white and have health insurance, the numbers show.

The average life span is tops on the Island: 92.9 years.

“The more educated people are, the greater the chances that they are making higher income,” Cantor said.

Tale of two census tracts

North Bellport and Bellport are a three-minute drive from each other, but they’re worlds apart in so many ways.  

Bellport has its fair share of mansions and a downtown alive with restaurants, specialty shops, a deli and an antique store.

North Bellport is dotted with industrial sites and bisected by Montauk Highway and Long Island Rail Road tracks. Over the years, abandoned houses have been a challenge. 

The numbers reflect their differences. 

Bellport’s median income is $82,500. The population is 92 percent white, and about 97 percent of the residents graduated from high school. Joblessness is at roughly 3 percent; just under 4 percent of residents don’t have health insurance. The average life expectancy: 86.9 years.

In North Bellport, the median income is $50,000. The rates of unemployment and the uninsured are more than 4 percent and almost 17 percent, respectively. Roughly two-thirds of the residents have a high school diploma. And the population is diverse: 43 percent Hispanic, 30 percent African-American and  27 percent white and other backgrounds. The average number of years to live: 73.2

Pastor Michael Caiazzo sees the statistics play out on the street every day. He works for the Lighthouse Mission in North Bellport, which provides food and counseling to lower-income families.

His focus is on the kids, especially those who live in single-parent households where money can be even tighter.

“It’s harder, there are more challenges,” said Caiazzo, who grew up in the area. “It’s easier for them to give up.”

His message: Take hold of your own life.

“In the end of the day I tell them to look in the mirror and ask, ‘What did I do to help myself today?”

Moving the goalposts

Life expectancy isn’t set in stone: Both public policy and personal responsibility can tip the scales, experts said. 

Everyone can make choices that increase the odds of a longer life, said Cantor, of the Center for Socio-Economic Policy. 

Eating well, exercising, not smoking, getting enough sleep and staying in school are decisions made by each and every one of us, he said. 

“It’s not a done deal,” Cantor said. “There are always outliers.”

Martine Hackett is a public health expert who lives in Uniondale, where the census tract has a life expectancy of about 74 years. She agrees that individuals have a measure of control over how long they live, but she also sees conditions in her community that can counter good decisions.

Fast-food outlets, for example, can line major thoroughfares, and fear of crime can keep parents from taking their kids to the park, said Hackett, who is an associate professor of public health at Hofstra University.

One option might be to simply find a new place to settle down, she said. 

“I know that sounds kind of trite,” said Hackett. “People have community ties, and there’s affordability issues, and people might not feel welcome in some other place.”

Moving, though, is a fix for only a relatively few, Hackett said. Society as a whole needs to work at reducing the disparities from neighborhood to neighborhood, she said.   

For activists Rebecca Sanin and Elaine Gross, public policy can play a big part in leveling the playing field. 

“There’s so many governments, so many school systems operating independently,” said Sanin, president of the Health and Welfare Council of Long Island, an umbrella nonprofit that aims to improve the lives of the needy by advocating for public policies and services.

Long Island is becoming increasingly connected, Sanin said. Twenty years ago, a child living in Brentwood might never cross paths with one in Manhasset. Today, because of technology and social media, the chances are good that they know each other, she said. 

“We need to look at more regional planning, rather than this block versus that block,” she said.

As president of ERASE Racism, Gross is focused on getting Long Island to talk more about segregation and racism. The conversation has never been easy, she said.    

“It’s disheartening — the discriminatory policies that shape where people can live,” she said. “We bake in these racial disparities.”

More discussion will help the Island become more proactive on dealing with inequities, she said.

Gross is seeing positive signs. In the past two months, ERASE Racism held a handful of community forums that drew some 700 residents Islandwide, more than she expected. 

The sessions touched on a wide range of topics, from unconscious bias to the role that media and culture play in fostering stereotypes to the policies and practices that perpetuate prejudice, she said.

“It was encouraging,” Gross said.

Hackett sounded a cautionary note: The role of government can quickly become controversial, she said. 

A discussion about life expectancy can devolve into politics, she said. 

“It feels disconnected from health,” she said. “It can become a discussion about what people deserve.”

 

Robert Gebelhoff: We are living in a new gilded age. 2018 proves it.

Boy, 2018 has been a tough year for the United States.

No, I’m not talking about the onslaught of news detailing Russia’s interference in our democracy (though that should make anyone sick). I’m talking about something deeper — the wellness of America. Because, if you take a step back a look at the totality of trends facing our country, it’s clear something isn’t right.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, for example, reported in November that life expectancy for the average American ticked downward for the third year in a row. The news attracted a storm of attention, given the record number of suicides and surging drug overdoses driving the trend — despite progress in reducing deaths for top sources of death in the United States, such as heart disease or cancer.

Other trends, however, passed by more quietly. In health care, for example, maternal deaths inched up slightly this year to 20.7 per 100,000 live births, according to data from the United Health Foundation. In fact, giving birth in the United States has become increasingly deadly over the past few decades, placing our country in the same category as developing nations such as Afghanistan and Swaziland. And the rates are even worse for mothers of color.

Infants are facing their own hurdles as well. The latest CDC data released this year shows that U.S. infant mortality rates, after steadily falling over the past few decades, haven’t decreased significantly for five years. Today it stands at 5.9 deaths per 1,000 births, far higher than the average rate of 3.9 deaths for developed countries. Again, it’s even worse for infants of color.

We can attribute many of these trends to a lack of access to health care, which itself is looking pretty grim. Data released this month by the Kaiser Family Foundation shows that, in 2017, we’ve begun to reverse gains in health-care coverage for the first time since the Affordable Care Act was enacted in 2010.

Okay, but what about the economy? The stock market might have stumbled in the past month, but most Americans still fared pretty well this year, right?

Yes, but there are worrisome holes here, as well. Median household incomes rose for the third-straight year in 2017, but the economy hasn’t benefited everyone equally. In fact, median incomes fell for African-American households.

And while unemployment is at the lowest rate in almost 50 years, the percentage of people in the labor force has remained mysteriously low relative to other developed countries. Experts say part of that trend can be explained by demographics as baby boomers retire, but U.S. participation rates also lag for people of working age. One analysis from this summer found that if the United States had the same working-age participation as Britain, we’d have to factor another 11 million people into the unemployment rate.

Consider, also, that despite persistent economic growth, the number of people receiving food-stamp benefits remains more than 50 percent higher than the number before the beginning of the Great Recession. Or that homelessness in the United States ticked up for a second year in a row. Or that child homelessness is surging in some parts of the country.

And if another recession is actually the horizon, as many forecasters predict, it is clear many Americans aren’t prepared for it. A Federal Reserve survey from earlier this year found that 40 percent of adults don’t have the savings to cover a $400 emergency and that more than a quarter skipped a medical treatment because of the cost in 2017. And, once again, financial well-being is even worse for people of color.

There are other troubling trends to keep in mind: High school-level attainment might be at our highest rates ever, but college readiness continued to fall, as college entrance exams from this year show. Test scores for fourth- and eighth-graders didn’t do too well either, and racial disparities in education widened.

Meanwhile, most Americans believe race relations have gotten worse over the past two years. The number of reported hate crimes increased by 17 percent according to the most recent available data — though the actual number could be as much as 40 times larger. And the United States is becoming more racially segregated, both in terms of our schools and where we live.

I could go on. Climate change is making weather events more extreme and more expensive, hurting low-income Americans the most. Polarization is forcing Americans further and further apart to the point that we’re increasingly unable to connect with one another. Trust in our society’s institutions — such as churches, our courts, the media and government — has eroded to new lows.

Perhaps this explains why United States fell four spots in the World Happiness report in 2018. In fact, the Gallup-Sharecare Index reported in March that it saw significant declines in well-being in 21 states in 2017, the most states with a drop in a single year since the index began measuring well-being at the height of the 2008 financial crisis.

There are many things contributing to these trends, but if we pull one takeaway from 2018, it’s that rising inequality is deepening fissures within American society. This divide has afforded those doing well to sail forth in the booming economy and escape the headwinds facing our country, but the rest of America — especially low-income households and minorities — haven’t been so lucky. This is the new gilded age — to borrow insight from Mark Twain. It appears gold from the outside, complete with stunning economic growth and opportunity. But beneath that shimmering layer are social problems that are only getting worse. Until we address that underlying inequality, it’s tough to see the coming years getting any better.

Robert Gebelhoff | The Washington Post

Robert Gebelhoff is an assistant editor for The Washington Post’s Opinions section. He has been with The Post since 2015 and his work appears on the PostPartisan blog.

‘I resolve to do better’: Playwright Robert Lepage on 2018 race controversy

MONTREAL — Renowned Quebec director Robert Lepage is promising to be more racially sensitive with his work in the new year after two of his plays in 2018 were widely condemned by members of Quebec’s black and Indigenous communities.

In a public letter published Friday, Lepage — recognized around the world for his theatre productions — acknowledged “clumsiness and misjudgments” that led to the cancellation of his play on black slavery last summer during the Montreal International Jazz Festival.

Called “SLAV,” the play included a mostly white cast picking cotton and singing black slave songs. Activists protested outside the theatre and accused Lepage of appropriating black pain for profit.

Lepage admits in the letter “the version of SLAV that we were presenting last June was far from finished and that perhaps it wasn’t by chance that the show’s dramaturgical problems corresponded exactly to the ethical problems the show was criticized for.”

The director and playwright didn’t make many public statements during the controversy and Friday’s letter goes into detail about his meeting with a group of black artists and activists whose protests helped cancel his play.

“… Unlike the angry far-left extremists depicted in certain media, the people I met with were welcoming, open, perceptive, intelligent, cultivated, articulate and peaceful,” Lepage wrote.

He said following the June protests “the content of SLAV has been reworked and rewritten” and the play is scheduled to be shown again in select theatres across the province beginning in January.

The Gilles-Vigneault theatre in Saint-Jerome, about 60 kilometres north of Montreal, is one of several venues scheduled to host SLAV, in early 2019. Tickets can still be purchased for dates in cities such as Sherbrooke, Drummondville and Saguenay.

“As this new year begins,” Lepage wrote, “I resolve to do better.”

Lepage committed in the letter to inviting a member of the activist group to rehearsals of SLAV to witness changes made to the show before it is remounted next month. He said he would make “structural changes” within his production company and will “ensure a significant representation of people of African descent from Quebec City in the programming” of his upcoming new theatre in that city.

One of the artists and activists mentioned by name in the letter is Lucas Charlie Rose, whose initial posts on social media about SLAV helped trigger the protest movement against the play.

“I’m really happy this letter got posted,” Rose said in an interview. “I felt like it was important to show people that we are actually in contact. What happened this summer wasn’t just a controversy … but the start of a really important conversation that we hope is going to change the artistic climate in Quebec.”

Friday’s letter did not address the criticism surrounding another one of Lepage’s productions — “Kanata” — a play about the relationship between whites and Indigenous Peoples. Indigenous activists and artists accused Lepage of producing a culturally insensitive play with little input from the communities portrayed.

The play was scheduled to run in Paris but was cancelled in July after American co-producers withdrew. But in September, Lepage announced the show would go on, reworked and under a new name: “Kanata — Episode 1 — The Controversy.” Three Indigenous artists from Quebec travelled to Paris in December to see the dress rehearsals for the show and came back disappointed.

Rose said he’s not optimistic the revamped “SLAV” will be better than the original.

“I’m very curious to see what it’s going to look like, and I speak for myself when I say this, but I’m skeptical,” he said. “I think the best thing to do, is to go back to the drawing board and put together a brand-new play.”

Rose, however, lauded Lepage’s commitment to including more black perspectives in his future work in Quebec City.

“Only good things can come out of something like that,” Rose said. “Because black people have a cultural power that is very important.”

Giuseppe Valiante, The Canadian Press


RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

US Parents Spend Billions on Adult Children


U.S. parents spend twice as much on adult children as they contribute to their retirement accounts, often contributing to expenses such as weddings.
Photo: AP

DoubleTree Portland Says It’s Investigating After Kicking African-American Man Out Of Hotel

The DoubleTree Portland announced in a series of tweets Friday it plans to hire a third-party to investigate a Dec. 22 incident that resulted in an African-American man being kicked out of his hotel room.

The hotel employees involved in the incident have been placed on leave, the hotel said.

“We are seeking the counsel of community leaders, and will engage a third-party to conduct a full investigation into the incident – reviewing our internal processes, protocols and trainings to ensure we are creating and maintaining a safe space for everyone,” the DoubleTree Portland said on Twitter.

The incident took place around 11:23 p.m. on Saturday in the hotel’s lobby, where Jermaine Massey, 34, was talking on his phone when hotel security guard Earl Meyers, 71, asked him to prove he was a guest of the hotel or leave, according to a report by the Portland Police Bureau.

Massey, from Kent, Washington, accused Meyers of being racist, the police report states.

“Did you ask any of those people walking by what room they were staying in? No,” Massey said addressing Meyers in a series of recorded videos documenting the incident that were uploaded to social media.

The DoubleTree by Hilton hotel in the Lloyd District of Portland, Oregon, Friday, Dec. 28, 2018.

The DoubleTree by Hilton hotel in the Lloyd District of Portland, Oregon, Friday, Dec. 28, 2018.

Bradley W. Parks/OPB

The hotel said Monday it had reached out to Massey. But on Thursday, Massey said through his attorneys that he’s not interested in a closed-door discussion.

“The hotel has requested a private discussion, but Mr. Massey was publicly humiliated,” attorneys Gregory and Jason Kafoury of the law firm Kafoury and McDougal wrote in a statement.

The hotel also tweeted an apology Friday.

“We have a zero-tolerance stance on discrimination of any kind, and do not tolerate behavior of that nature,” the hotel said on Twitter. “We sincerely apologize to Mr. Massey for his treatment this past weekend, and deeply regret the experience he endured. It was unacceptable and contrary to our values, beliefs and how we seek to treat all people who visit our hotel.”

The hotel didn’t immediately respond to questions about who would be conducting the hotel’s investigation or which community groups the hotel has reached out to.

This story will be updated.

We are living in a new gilded age. 2018 proves it.


A homeless person near the entrance of a Metro station in Washington. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)
Assistant editor and Opinions contributor

December 28 at 9:00 AM

Boy, 2018 has been a tough year for the United States.

No, I’m not talking about the onslaught of news detailing Russia’s interference in our democracy (though that should make anyone sick). I’m talking about something deeper — the wellness of America. Because, if you take a step back a look at the totality of trends facing our country, it’s clear something isn’t right.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, for example, reported in November that life expectancy for the average American ticked downward for the third year in a row. The news attracted a storm of attention, given the record number of suicides and surging drug overdoses driving the trend — despite progress in reducing deaths for top sources of death in the United States, such as heart disease or cancer.

Other trends, however, passed by more quietly. In health care, for example, maternal deaths inched up slightly this year to 20.7 per 100,000 live births, according to data from the United Health Foundation. In fact, giving birth in the United States has become increasingly deadly over the past few decades, placing our country in the same category as developing nations such as Afghanistan and Swaziland. And the rates are even worse for mothers of color.

Infants are facing their own hurdles as well. The latest CDC data released this year shows that U.S. infant mortality rates, after steadily falling over the past few decades, haven’t decreased significantly for five years. Today it stands at 5.9 deaths per 1,000 births, far higher than the average rate of 3.9 deaths for developed countries. Again, it’s even worse for infants of color.

We can attribute many of these trends to a lack of access to health care, which itself is looking pretty grim. Data released this month by the Kaiser Family Foundation shows that, in 2017, we’ve begun to reverse gains in health-care coverage for the first time since the Affordable Care Act was enacted in 2010.

Okay, but what about the economy? The stock market might have stumbled in the past month, but most Americans still fared pretty well this year, right?

Yes, but there are worrisome holes here, as well. Median household incomes rose for the third-straight year in 2017, but the economy hasn’t benefited everyone equally. In fact, median incomes fell for African American households.

And while unemployment is at the lowest rate in almost 50 years, the percentage of people in the labor force has remained mysteriously low relative to other developed countries. Experts say part of that trend can be explained by demographics as baby boomers retire, but U.S. participation rates also lag for people of working age. One analysis from this summer found that if the United States had the same working-age participation as Britain, we’d have to factor another 11 million people into the unemployment rate.

Consider, also, that despite persistent economic growth, the number of people receiving food-stamp benefits remains more than 50 percent higher than the number before the beginning of the Great Recession. Or that homelessness in the United States ticked up for a second year in a row. Or that child homelessness is surging in some parts of the country.

And if another recession is actually the horizon, as many forecasters predict, it is clear many Americans aren’t prepared for it. A Federal Reserve survey from earlier this year found that 40 percent of adults don’t have the savings to cover a $400 emergency and that more than a quarter skipped a medical treatment because of the cost in 2017. And, once again, financial well-being is even worse for people of color.

There are other troubling trends to keep in mind: High school-level attainment might be at our highest rates ever, but college readiness continued to fall, as college entrance exams from this year show. Test scores for fourth- and eighth-graders didn’t do too well either, and racial disparities in education widened.

Meanwhile, most Americans believe race relations have gotten worse over the past two years. The number of reported hate crimes increased by 17 percent according to the most recent available data — though the actual number could be as much as 40 times larger. And the United States is becoming more racially segregated, both in terms of our schools and where we live.

I could go on. Climate change is making weather events more extreme and more expensive, hurting low-income Americans the most. Polarization is forcing Americans further and further apart to the point that we’re increasingly unable to connect with one another. Trust in our society’s institutions — such as churches, our courts, the media and government — has eroded to new lows.

Perhaps this explains why United States fell four spots in the World Happiness report in 2018. In fact, the Gallup-Sharecare Index reported in March that it saw significant declines in well-being in 21 states in 2017, the most states with a drop in a single year since the index began measuring well-being at the height of the 2008 financial crisis.

There are many things contributing to these trends, but if we pull one takeaway from 2018, it’s that rising inequality is deepening fissures within American society. This divide has afforded those doing well to sail forth in the booming economy and escape the headwinds facing our country, but the rest of America — especially low-income households and minorities — haven’t been so lucky.

This is the new gilded age — to borrow insight from Mark Twain. It appears gold from the outside, complete with stunning economic growth and opportunity. But beneath that shimmering layer are social problems that are only getting worse. Until we address that underlying inequality, it’s tough to see the coming years getting any better.

Read more:

Robert Gebelhoff: The worst of America in one number

The Post’s View: America is losing ground to death and despair

Robert J. Samuelson: Was the Great Recession worse than the Great Depression?

Robert Gebelhoff: Republicans are about to lose more than 450 years of experience in Congress

Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Pattern Linked to Higher Kidney Disease Risk

(HealthNewsDigest.com) – Washington, DC — Higher collective consumption of sweetened fruit drinks, soda, and water was associated with a higher likelihood of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a community-based study of African-American adults in Mississippi. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), contribute to the growing body of evidence pointing to the negative health consequences of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages.

Certain beverages may affect kidney health, but study results have been inconsistent. To provide more clarity, Casey Rebholz PhD, MS, MNSP, MPH (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health) and her colleagues prospectively studied 3003 African-American men and women with normal kidney function who were enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study.

“There is a lack of comprehensive information on the health implications of the wide range of beverage options that are available in the food supply,” said Dr. Rebholz. “In particular, there is limited information on which types of beverages and patterns of beverages are associated with kidney disease risk in particular.”

For their study, the investigators assessed beverage intake through a food frequency questionnaire administered at the start of the study in 2000-04, and they followed participants until 2009-13.

Among the 3003 participants, 185 (6%) developed CKD over a median follow-up of 8 years. After adjustment for confounding factors, consuming a beverage pattern consisting of soda, sweetened fruit drinks, and water was associated with a higher risk of developing CKD. Participants in the top tertile for consumption of this beverage pattern were 61% more likely to develop CKD than those in the bottom tertile.

The researchers were surprised to see that water was a component of this beverage pattern that was linked with a higher risk of CKD. They noted that study participants may have reported their consumption of a wide variety of types of water, including flavored and sweetened water. Unfortunately, the investigators did not collect information about specific brands or types of bottled water in the Jackson Heart Study.

In an accompanying editorial, Holly Kramer, MD, MPH and David Shoham, PhD (Loyola University Chicago) noted that the findings hold strong public health implications. “While a few select U.S. cities have successfully reduced SSB [sugar sweetened beverage] consumption via taxation, all other municipalities have resisted public health efforts to lower SSB consumption,” they wrote. “This cultural resistance to reducing SSB consumption can be compared to the cultural resistance to smoking cessation during the 1960s after the Surgeon General report was released. During the 1960s, tobacco use was viewed as a social choice and not a medical or social public health problem.”

In an accompanying Patient Voice editorial, Duane Sunwold explained that he is a patient with CKD who changed his eating and drinking patterns to put his disease in remission. As a chef, he offers a number of recommendations to fellow patients trying to decrease their consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks.

Study co-authors include Bessie Young, MD, MPH, Ronit Katz, PhD, Katherine Tucker, PhD, Teresa Carithers, PhD, RD, LD, Arnita Norwood, PhD, MPH, RD, and Adolfo Correa, MD, PhD, MPH.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled “Patterns of Beverages Consumed and Risk of Incident Kidney Disease,” will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on December 27, 2018, doi: 10.2215/CJN.06380518.

The accompanying editorial, entitled “The Millennial Physician and the Obesity Epidemic: A Tale of Sugar Sweetened Beverages,” will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on December 27, 2018.

The Patient Voice editorial, entitled “Diet and Risk for Developing Kidney Disease,” will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on December 27, 2018.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has more than 20,000 members representing 131 countries. For more information, please visit www.asn-online.org or contact the society at 202-640-4660.

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African American Dance Ensemble’s Kwanzaa Fest

African American Dance Ensemble’s Kwanzaa Fest

Categories: Music, Community, Free, Kwanza, Culture and Heritage, Fundraiser
Visit Their Website
Pricing info: FREE

Ticket Info:FREE

Join Us on January 1, 2019, at the Historic Durham Armory (212 Foster Street), in Downtown Durham, North Carolina. Bring the entire family for a day of Unity, Culture and Community Development. The doors will open at 12 noon, Children’s Village at 12:30 and the performances at 2:00pm.

Kwanzaa is a celebration for ALL people, focusing on family, friends, and the fruits of the earth. Celebrating the holiday season and Durham’s diversity, AADE’s annual Kwanzaa celebration is a time to enjoy family, community, and culture. Kwanzaa itself is a seven-day African holiday that celebrates a different principle each day. AADE’s Kwanzaa takes place on the seventh day, which is dedicated to Imani, or faith.

Kwanzaa Fest is FREE and open to the Public!!! Come enjoy games, arts & crafts, a drumming class, and Durham’s Fire Department at our Children’s Village.

In honor of Baba Chuck Davis, your donated items will be given to Urban Ministries of Durham. Let’s come together as a community to bless Urban Ministries. Click the link below for a complete list of items

http://www.umdurham.org/donate/food-pantry-list.html

OWU announces January public events

Ohio Wesleyan University has announced its January 2019 lineup of public events. Unless otherwise noted, admission is free. For the latest OWU event information, visit www.owu.edu/calendar or “like” www.facebook.com/OhioWesleyanUniversityNews. For a list of Battling Bishop athletics events, visit www.battlingbishops.com.

• Jan. 16 – April 25 – “Gaps In Memory,” featuring archival digital prints created by artist and Ohio Wesleyan alumna Barbara Jenkins, in the Mowry Alumni Gallery inside Mowry Hall, 16 Rowland Ave., Delaware. Jenkins, Class of 1972, works to break preconceptions by making linkages and disruptions between photographs in triptychs. Mowry Alumni Gallery hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday when the university’s administrative offices are open. Learn more about Ohio Wesleyan’s Ross Art Museum and its satellite galleries at www.owu.edu/ross.

• 8 p.m. Jan. 18 and 25 – Friday evening programs at Ohio Wesleyan’s Perkins Observatory, 3199 Columbus Pike (U.S. 23), Delaware. (The observatory will be closed Jan. 5 and Jan. 12.) Content varies based on sky conditions but may include a planetarium show, observatory tours, and stargazing with the 32-inch Schottland Telescope. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Reserve tickets by calling (740) 363-1257. Learn more at www.owu.edu/perkins.

• 7 p.m. Jan. 19 – 55th annual OWU President’s High School Band Festival, featuring high school musicians from around the region and Ohio Wesleyan’s Symphonic Wind Ensemble, conducted by OWU music professor Larry Griffin, in Gray Chapel inside University Hall, 61 S. Sandusky St., Delaware. The event will be streamed live at www.owu.edu/stream. Admission is free. Learn more at www.owu.edu/music.

• 3:15 p.m. Jan. 20 – “We Are Women” faculty and guest concert featuring Jennifer Whitehead, soprano; Mariko Kaneda, piano; Carolyn Redman, mezzo soprano; and Christopher Purdy, WOSU FM Classical 101 Radio, narrator, in Jemison Auditorium inside Sanborn Hall, 23 Elizabeth St., Delaware. Admission is free. Learn more at www.owu.edu/music.

• Jan. 22 – March 31 – “Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow,” featuring works exclusively by African American artists and artists from the African Diaspora, at the Richard M. Ross Art Museum, 60 S. Sandusky St., Delaware. This first-of-its-kind exhibit at the Ross is in celebration of the “I Too Sing American: Harlem Renaissance 100” and is curated by Bettye J. Stull, an expert in African American art and longtime curator for the King Arts Complex. An opening reception will be held from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 27 at the museum. During the academic year, the Ross is open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The museum is handicap-accessible and admission is always free. Call (740) 368-3606 or visit www.owu.edu/ross for more information.

• 7:30 p.m. Jan. 30 – Author and filmmaker Sarah Burns will screen and discuss “The Central Park Five,” a documentary about the 1989 Central Park jogger case in which five black and Hispanic teenagers were wrongfully convicted of raping a woman, spending between six and 13 years in prison before a serial rapist confessed. Burns will speak in Gray Chapel inside University Hall, 61 S. Sandusky St., Delaware. She directed “The Central Park Five” with her father, acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns, and she wrote a book of the same name. Her screening and presentation is OWU’s 2019 Butler A. Jones Lecture on Race and Society sponsored by the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Social Justice Program, and Black Student Union with the following OWU departments, programs and offices: Journalism and Communication, Modern Foreign Languages, Film Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies, Black World Studies, Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, and President’s Office. Admission is free. Learn more about the lecture series at www.owu.edu/soan.

2019 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration

• 3 p.m. Jan. 20 – The 34th annual worship service will be held at Delaware City Vineyard, 32 Troy Road, Delaware. The free event will feature remarks from Charles A. Montgomery Jr., Ph.D., east campus pastor for Vineyard Columbus and an affiliated professor at Ohio Christian University.

• 7:45 a.m. Jan. 21 – The 26th annual MLK Breakfast Celebration, sponsored by Ohio Wesleyan University and the Delaware County Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Committee, will be held in the Benes Room of OWU’s Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave., Delaware. Bishop Tracy S. Malone, resident bishop of the East Ohio Conference of the United Methodist Church, will serve as the featured speaker. Malone also is a member of the OWU Board of Trustees. The buffet will open at 7:45 a.m., followed by the program at 8:30 a.m. Individual tickets are $25, with eight-person table sponsorships available for $175. Proceeds support MLK Celebration Committee initiatives, including the MLK Scholarship, awarded annually to one or more outstanding high school graduates of Delaware County schools. Tickets may be purchased online at www.eventbrite.com or by mail via the Ohio Wesleyan Chaplain’s Office, Attention: Sharon Hayes, 40 Rowland Ave., HWCC 308, Delaware, Ohio 43015. Reservations and payment are requested before Jan. 8. (A limited number of tickets may be available at the door.) For more information, contact Hayes at sehayes@owu.edu or (740) 368-3083.

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