The most talked about cultural moments that defined 2018

Written by Marianna Cerini, CNN

This selection of events was edited by the CNN Style team.

History has taught us that challenging times can often breed good culture. Art, music, film and fashion are all forms of storytelling, and the best stories often require a little tension. This year certainly didn’t come up short on that front. Read on for a reminder of the most significant cultural moments of 2018.

Time’s Up at the Golden Globes

Stars wore black outfits to the Golden Globes.

Stars wore black outfits to the Golden Globes. Credit: Handout/Getty Images North America/NBCUniversal via Getty Images

In January, the Golden Globes event was shaken by a wave of activism: Time’s Up. The movement, launched at the start of the year by women and men from the entertainment industry, aims to combat sexual harassment in Hollywood and beyond.

At the Globes, the movement was visible on the red carpet — a number of actresses and actors attended the event dressed in black and donned Time’s Up pins. Some of the founding members further emphasized their message by inviting activists as their guests.

The gesture subverted red carpet routines: for the first time, the media attention wasn’t focused on the best, worst or weirdest gowns on show.

“Black Panther” — The movie, and the movement

A still from "Black Panther."

A still from “Black Panther.” Credit: © 2017 – Marvel Studios

Released in February 2018, Marvel’s “Black Panther” become the third highest-grossing film ever in the US, behind “Avatar” and “The Force Awakens.” But it was more than just a blockbuster hit.

Featuring a predominantly black cast and directed by Ryan Coogler, the movie, set in the fictional African nation of Wakanda, was hailed as a celebration of black culture, and put the issue of representation right at the heart of Hollywood cinema.

The film was also praised for shedding new light on Afrofuturism, a philosophy first introduced in the early 1990s that explores black identity and culture through the lens of technology. Its representation of a fantasy African country, unencumbered by a history of colonialism and among the most technologically advanced in the world, was visually told with costumes inspired by the art, clothing and customs of different African tribes — all with a futuristic twist.

The Obamas unveiled their official portraits

Former US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama stand beside their portraits after their unveiling at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, February 12, 2018.

Former US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama stand beside their portraits after their unveiling at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, February 12, 2018. Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

The Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. unveiled two major new works in February: the official portraits of former US President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama.

Painted by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald — a first in the history of presidential portraits — the artworks broke away from traditional presidential portraiture, showing powerful, colorful images that reconfigured the canon in more inclusive ways.

The portraits received mostly positive responses from critics for championing artistic representation both in their subjects and makers. They were also well-received by the public. Attendance at the National Portrait Gallery went off the charts after the unveiling, with the first lady’s portrait proving so popular it had to be relocated to a more spacious room.

Balkrishna Doshi took home India’s first Pritzker Prize

Balkrishna Doshi_ courtesy of VSF

Balkrisha Doshi is considered one of India’s top architects. Credit: Vastu Shilpa Consultants

Indian architect Balkrishna Vithaldas Doshi was named the 2018 laureate of the Pritzker Prize in March, the first Indian to win the accolade in its four-decade history.

Considered one of the Indian subcontinent’s preeminent living architects, the 91-year-old is known for designing low-cost housing and public institutions, over a career spanning almost 70 years.

Among his most acclaimed projects are Tagore Memorial Hall in Ahmedabad and the Aranya Low Cost Housing development, a collection of more than 6,500 residences in the city of Indore.

“Balkrishna Doshi has always created an architecture that is serious, never flashy or a follower of trends,” said the Pritzker jury in its citation, praising his work as embodying “a deep sense of responsibility and a desire to contribute to his country and its people through high-quality, authentic architecture.”

Kendrick Lamar won a Pulitzer

Kendrick Lamar wasn’t the most obvious choice for the Pulitzer Prize for music. Since it was first established in 1943, the award has historically been granted only to classical and jazz artists — the latter still almost a rarity in its list of winners.

That’s what makes the rap and hip-hop artist’s win in April all the more groundbreaking. Lamar won for his fourth studio album DAMN, which the Pulitzer board described as a “virtuosic song collection unified by its vernacular authenticity and rhythmic dynamism that offers affecting vignettes capturing the complexity of modern African American life.”

Beyoncé made Coachella history

Beyonce performs at Coachella.

Beyonce performs at Coachella. Credit: Larry Busacca/Getty Images/Larry Busacca/Getty Images/Larry Busacca/Getty Images

Beyoncé is already a global superstar, but her performance at Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in California in the spring — cleverly rebranded #Beychella — was special.

The first black woman to ever headline the event, the artist put on a visually complex show many have described as historic. The New York Times wrote there would not be “a more meaningful, absorbing, forceful and radical performance by an American musician this year, or any year soon.”

Beyoncé appeared as a queen figure in a Nefertiti costume by Balmain, then transformed into the leader of a sorority, engaging the audience with an awe-inspiring rendition of “Lift every voice and sing.” She went through most of her extensive repertoire, but also borrowed from Nina Simone, Juvenile and Outkast, among others, as transitions in her routine. It was a celebration of black history, music styles, expression and womanhood.

K-pop went truly global

South Korean pop group BTS during one of their performances in October.

South Korean pop group BTS during one of their performances in October. Credit: YOAN VALAT/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

In April, K-pop group BTS won the 2018 Time 100 Reader Poll, the magazine’s reader survey of the most popular figures of the year. The win was a further confirmation that K-pop is now a phenomenon of global proportions, and BTS a household name in the highly-competitive American music market.

The genre has been on the rise for a few years now — BTS has been performing since 2013, but 2018 has been particularly noteworthy, partly because of the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, in February. There, a select group of K-pop hits, including BTS’ “DNA” were played during the Parade of Nations.

Audiences have taken notice, and American ones have been perhaps the most surprising. In the states, K-pop owned the year: BTS topped the Billboard 200 twice and BLACKPINK became the first K-pop girl group to chart on the Billboard Hot 100 since 2009.

‘Heavenly Bodies’ turned up to The Met

Anna Wintour and Bee Shaffer attend the Heavenly Bodies: Fashion & The Catholic Imagination Costume Institute Gala at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Anna Wintour and Bee Shaffer attend the Heavenly Bodies: Fashion & The Catholic Imagination Costume Institute Gala at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Credit: Theo Wargo/Getty Images North America/Getty Images for Huffington Post

The annual Costume Institute exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York titled “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination” opened in May and explored the relationship between holy traditions and fashion, looking at how Catholicism has influenced art, clothing and the creative process of major 20th- and 21st-century designers.

Held in partnership with the Vatican, it was an ambitious show that didn’t simply mix the sacred and the profane, but showed how they are mixed more often than we’d think, and how fashion and religion have so many points of contact. On display were previously unseen papal robes and ecclesiastical vestments, next to a stunning catalog of gowns by Chanel and Versace, to name a few.

Childish Gambino’s released ‘This is America’

Childish Gambino — the stage name of actor, singer and rapper Donald Glover — dominated the internet with possibly the best music video of the year: “This is America.” Released in May, the clip became an instant sensation for its provocative, compelling visuals and message.

Set in an empty warehouse, it shows the artist running and dancing while frenzied, hard-to-watch, escalating violence breaks around and within him (he guns down a choir at one point).

Charged with metaphors, the four-minute visual experience has been hailed as a work of genius, and a poignant — if cryptic — social commentary on contemporary America, gun violence and the black experience.

Millions watched the Royal Wedding

Meghan’s Givenchy bridal dress: Expert opinion

On May 19, the American actress formerly known as Meghan Markle married Britain’s Prince Harry at St. George’s Chapel in Windsor. The royal wedding was one of the most anticipated events of the year, and broadcast to millions around the world. A star-studded guest list included Amal and George Clooney, Serena Williams and Oprah Winfrey.

Meghan became the first biracial person to ever marry into the British monarchy, and her cultural identity was celebrated in ways that were groundbreaking for royal wedding traditions. An address by American preacher and Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church Michael Curry, which saw him repeatedly quote Martin Luther King, Jr. but also mention slavery, was seen by many as one of the day’s most moving highlights. A solemn version of “Stand By Me” performed by the UK Christian gospel group Kingdom Choir — again, a departure from the more classic repertoires of similar weddings — also was a standout moment.

As with most events of the kind, though, the unveiling of the bride’s dress — a closely guarded secret for months — was a scene stealer. The now Duchess of Sussex chose a modest ivory silk gown by British designer Clare Waight Keller, Givenchy’s first female artistic director.

Crazy Rich Asians became a box-office hit

A still from "Crazy Rich Asians."

A still from “Crazy Rich Asians.” Credit: IMDB/Warner Brothers

Besides “Black Panther,” the film industry had another major breakthrough this year: the release of “Crazy Rich Asians,” which hit theaters in August.

Based on the bestselling novel by Singaporean author Kevin Kwan, the adaptation marked a momentous shift for diversity in Hollywood, by starring an all-Asian cast. The last time a major Hollywood production did the same was 25 years ago, with “The Joy Luck Club” in 1993.

“Crazy Rich Asians” topped box offices, bringing in $25.2 million in the US in its opening weekend, and grossing $238 million worldwide. The film has been praised for lifting the visibility of Asian and Asian-American talent in Hollywood, at a time when the demographic remains underrepresented on big screens.
“Before [‘Crazy Rich Asians’], I hadn’t even done a tiny part in a studio film,” Constance Wu, who played the film’s lead character Rachel Chu, wrote in a message posted to Twitter, before the film’s release. “I never dreamed I would get to star in one… because I had never seen that happen to someone who looked like me. This month, Wu garnered a best actress Golden Globe nomination for her performance.
However, the film flopped in China, the world’s fastest growing film market, where it earned less than $1 million in its opening weekend, due to the lack of locally known stars and the cultural differences between mainland China and the diaspora.

Michael Kors bought Versace for $2 billion

Donatella Versace: A fashion icon ft. Lady Gaga

In September, American fashion brand Michael Kors announced the acquisition of Italian powerhouse Versace for $2.1 billion.

The deal put the spotlight on Kors’ ambitious plans for his own company, which will be renamed Capri Holdings: to create America’s first-ever luxury conglomerate (Kors also purchased Jimmy Choo in 2017).

If successful, the new group will essentially compete against European juggernauts LVMH (whose brands includes Givenchy, Fendi and Dior, among many others) and Kering (Gucci, Saint Laurent, Alexander McQueen, Balenciaga and others), aiming to disrupt luxury fashion’s current power structure.

Banksy’s work sold for $1.4M, then promptly self-destructed

Banksy’s shredded artwork renamed

In October, one of the most iconic pieces by British artist Banksy, the “Girl with Balloon (2006),” was sold for $1.4 million at a Sotheby’s auction house in London. As the gavel fell to seal the sale, however, the image began self-destructing, sucked into a shredder hidden in its frame.

“Going, going, gone…” Banksy wrote on Instagram, under an image of befuddled attendees watching the work being destroyed. The day after the incident, the artist also published a video showing how he built the paper shredder. “The urge to destroy is also a creative urge,” he wrote, quoting Picasso.

The shredded work was given the new title “Love is in the bin,” and the winning bidder — a female European collector and long-standing Sotheby’s client — announced she would keep it in its new form.

Dolce and Gabbana’s had a big China disaster

Still from one of the three promo videos released on D&G's social media accounts.

Still from one of the three promo videos released on D&G’s social media accounts. Credit: Dolce & Gabbana

Days before it was supposed to hold a major runway show in Shanghai at the end of November, Italian powerhouse Dolce & Gabbana found itself at the center of a scandal that might cost the brand its future business in China.

In an effort to promote the fashion event, the luxury label released three promotional videos on its social media accounts featuring an Asian model struggling to eat pasta, pizza and cannoli with chopsticks. The clips sparked criticism both in China and abroad, with many deeming the scenes as racist and also using outdated, patronizing and stereotypical tropes.

Things quickly worsened when screenshots of direct messages allegedly sent by Stefano Gabbana on Instagram were leaked online. The designer’s alleged rants (Gabbana has since claimed his account was hacked) revealed derogatory remarks towards China and Chinese people, and further provoked consumers in the country. A few hours after the leak, the Shanghai show was canceled. Angry social media users began posting images of D&G products in flames, or thrown in the trash, propelling a boycott that even saw e-tailers pull the label from their sites.

London Fashion Week went fur-free

Kendall Jenner walks in Burberry during London Fashion Week in London on September 17, 2018.

Kendall Jenner walks in Burberry during London Fashion Week in London on September 17, 2018. Credit: NIKLAS HALLE’N/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

An increasing number of fashion houses showed a deepened awareness towards sustainability this year, with many announcing they would no longer use animal fur in their products and collections.

The British Fashion Council (BFC) and London Fashion Week took the commitment further, by stating in September that the Spring/Summer 2019 shows (held that same month) would be completely fur free — a first for a main fashion week.

None of the 80 participating designers featured fur in their lines — although the decision wasn’t a complete ban. “The BFC survey results reflect a cultural change based on ideals and choices made by designer businesses, international brands as well as consumer sentiment,” the organization said in a statement.

New York Fashion Week woke up

Models walk the runway for the Savage X Fenty Fall/Winter 2018 fashion show during NYFW at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on September 12, 2018 in Brooklyn, NY.

Models walk the runway for the Savage X Fenty Fall/Winter 2018 fashion show during NYFW at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on September 12, 2018 in Brooklyn, NY. Credit: Brian Ach/Getty Images North America/Getty Images for Savage X Fenty

The Spring-Summer 2019 shows at New York Fashion Week in September made the event one of the edgiest, most relevant happenings of the fashion calendar this year.

Presentations showed diversity on the runway, from swim- and athleticwear label Chromat’s casting of a breast cancer survivor, a hijabi model and an amputee, among others; to Shanel Campbell’s debut with an all-black roster of models; and Marco Marco Underwear employing an all-trans line-up.

Modest fashion took center stage too, and spun a number of think pieces inspired by the designer Batsheva Hay. Designers also engaged politically, particularly in the form of tees. Luxury streetwear brand Pyer Moss — the winner of the 2018 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, and a champion of activist fashion aimed at elevating the African-American experience — had a particularly powerful array of slogan T-shirts that read “See Us Now?” and “Stop Calling 911 On The Culture.”

Rihanna also made headlines by closing the week with a show for her lingerie and intimates line Savage X Fenty, an inspiring celebration of womanhood in all forms, body types and race, and a critical success.

David Hockney made art history

David Hockney painting sells for $90M, smashing auction records

A David Hockney painting of two men, one swimming in a turquoise pool, the other watching from the side, fetched $90 million at a Christie’s auction in New York in November, breaking the auction record for a living artist.

Titled “Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures),” the work dates back to 1972, when it was first sold by Hockney’s New York dealer for just $18,000 — a sale the artist still feels bittersweet about.

Hockney told CNN the painting was inspired by the accidental juxtaposition of “two photographs on my studio floor, one of (former boyfriend Peter Schlesinger) and another of a swimmer, and they were just lying there and I put them together.”

This selection of events was edited by the CNN Style team.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Hottest cultural moments of 2018

Written by Marianna Cerini, CNN

This selection of events was edited by the CNN Style team.

History has taught us that challenging times can often breed good culture. Art, music, film and fashion are all forms of storytelling, and the best stories often require a little tension. This year certainly didn’t come up short on that front. Read on for a reminder of the most significant cultural moments of 2018.

Time’s Up at the Golden Globes

Stars wore black outfits to the Golden Globes.

Stars wore black outfits to the Golden Globes. Credit: Handout/Getty Images North America/NBCUniversal via Getty Images

In January, the Golden Globes event was shaken by a wave of activism: Time’s Up. The movement, launched at the start of the year by women and men from the entertainment industry, aims to combat sexual harassment in Hollywood and beyond.

At the Globes, the movement was visible on the red carpet — a number of actresses and actors attended the event dressed in black and donned Time’s Up pins. Some of the founding members further emphasized their message by inviting activists as their guests.

The gesture subverted red carpet routines: for the first time, the media attention wasn’t focused on the best, worst or weirdest gowns on show.

“Black Panther” — The movie, and the movement

A still from "Black Panther."

A still from “Black Panther.” Credit: © 2017 – Marvel Studios

Released in February 2018, Marvel’s “Black Panther” become the third highest-grossing film ever in the US, behind “Avatar” and “The Force Awakens.” But it was more than just a blockbuster hit.

Featuring a predominantly black cast and directed by Ryan Coogler, the movie, set in the fictional African nation of Wakanda, was hailed as a celebration of black culture, and put the issue of representation right at the heart of Hollywood cinema.

The film was also praised for shedding new light on Afrofuturism, a philosophy first introduced in the early 1990s that explores black identity and culture through the lens of technology. Its representation of a fantasy African country, unencumbered by a history of colonialism and among the most technologically advanced in the world, was visually told with costumes inspired by the art, clothing and customs of different African tribes — all with a futuristic twist.

The Obamas unveiled their official portraits

Former US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama stand beside their portraits after their unveiling at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, February 12, 2018.

Former US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama stand beside their portraits after their unveiling at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, February 12, 2018. Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

The Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. unveiled two major new works in February: the official portraits of former US President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama.

Painted by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald — a first in the history of presidential portraits — the artworks broke away from traditional presidential portraiture, showing powerful, colorful images that reconfigured the canon in more inclusive ways.

The portraits received mostly positive responses from critics for championing artistic representation both in their subjects and makers. They were also well-received by the public. Attendance at the National Portrait Gallery went off the charts after the unveiling, with the first lady’s portrait proving so popular it had to be relocated to a more spacious room.

Balkrishna Doshi took home India’s first Pritzker Prize

Balkrishna Doshi_ courtesy of VSF

Balkrisha Doshi is considered one of India’s top architects. Credit: Vastu Shilpa Consultants

Indian architect Balkrishna Vithaldas Doshi was named the 2018 laureate of the Pritzker Prize in March, the first Indian to win the accolade in its four-decade history.

Considered one of the Indian subcontinent’s preeminent living architects, the 91-year-old is known for designing low-cost housing and public institutions, over a career spanning almost 70 years.

Among his most acclaimed projects are Tagore Memorial Hall in Ahmedabad and the Aranya Low Cost Housing development, a collection of more than 6,500 residences in the city of Indore.

“Balkrishna Doshi has always created an architecture that is serious, never flashy or a follower of trends,” said the Pritzker jury in its citation, praising his work as embodying “a deep sense of responsibility and a desire to contribute to his country and its people through high-quality, authentic architecture.”

Kendrick Lamar won a Pulitzer

Kendrick Lamar wasn’t the most obvious choice for the Pulitzer Prize for music. Since it was first established in 1943, the award has historically been granted only to classical and jazz artists — the latter still almost a rarity in its list of winners.

That’s what makes the rap and hip-hop artist’s win in April all the more groundbreaking. Lamar won for his fourth studio album DAMN, which the Pulitzer board described as a “virtuosic song collection unified by its vernacular authenticity and rhythmic dynamism that offers affecting vignettes capturing the complexity of modern African American life.”

Beyoncé made Coachella history

Beyonce performs at Coachella.

Beyonce performs at Coachella. Credit: Larry Busacca/Getty Images/Larry Busacca/Getty Images/Larry Busacca/Getty Images

Beyoncé is already a global superstar, but her performance at Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in California in the spring — cleverly rebranded #Beychella — was special.

The first black woman to ever headline the event, the artist put on a visually complex show many have described as historic. The New York Times wrote there would not be “a more meaningful, absorbing, forceful and radical performance by an American musician this year, or any year soon.”

Beyoncé appeared as a queen figure in a Nefertiti costume by Balmain, then transformed into the leader of a sorority, engaging the audience with an awe-inspiring rendition of “Lift every voice and sing.” She went through most of her extensive repertoire, but also borrowed from Nina Simone, Juvenile and Outkast, among others, as transitions in her routine. It was a celebration of black history, music styles, expression and womanhood.

K-pop went truly global

South Korean pop group BTS during one of their performances in October.

South Korean pop group BTS during one of their performances in October. Credit: YOAN VALAT/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

In April, K-pop group BTS won the 2018 Time 100 Reader Poll, the magazine’s reader survey of the most popular figures of the year. The win was a further confirmation that K-pop is now a phenomenon of global proportions, and BTS a household name in the highly-competitive American music market.

The genre has been on the rise for a few years now — BTS has been performing since 2013, but 2018 has been particularly noteworthy, partly because of the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, in February. There, a select group of K-pop hits, including BTS’ “DNA” were played during the Parade of Nations.

Audiences have taken notice, and American ones have been perhaps the most surprising. In the states, K-pop owned the year: BTS topped the Billboard 200 twice and BLACKPINK became the first K-pop girl group to chart on the Billboard Hot 100 since 2009.

‘Heavenly Bodies’ turned up to The Met

Anna Wintour and Bee Shaffer attend the Heavenly Bodies: Fashion & The Catholic Imagination Costume Institute Gala at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Anna Wintour and Bee Shaffer attend the Heavenly Bodies: Fashion & The Catholic Imagination Costume Institute Gala at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Credit: Theo Wargo/Getty Images North America/Getty Images for Huffington Post

The annual Costume Institute exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York titled “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination” opened in May and explored the relationship between holy traditions and fashion, looking at how Catholicism has influenced art, clothing and the creative process of major 20th- and 21st-century designers.

Held in partnership with the Vatican, it was an ambitious show that didn’t simply mix the sacred and the profane, but showed how they are mixed more often than we’d think, and how fashion and religion have so many points of contact. On display were previously unseen papal robes and ecclesiastical vestments, next to a stunning catalog of gowns by Chanel and Versace, to name a few.

Childish Gambino’s released ‘This is America’

Childish Gambino — the stage name of actor, singer and rapper Donald Glover — dominated the internet with possibly the best music video of the year: “This is America.” Released in May, the clip became an instant sensation for its provocative, compelling visuals and message.

Set in an empty warehouse, it shows the artist running and dancing while frenzied, hard-to-watch, escalating violence breaks around and within him (he guns down a choir at one point).

Charged with metaphors, the four-minute visual experience has been hailed as a work of genius, and a poignant — if cryptic — social commentary on contemporary America, gun violence and the black experience.

Millions watched the Royal Wedding

Meghan’s Givenchy bridal dress: Expert opinion

On May 19, the American actress formerly known as Meghan Markle married Britain’s Prince Harry at St. George’s Chapel in Windsor. The royal wedding was one of the most anticipated events of the year, and broadcast to millions around the world. A star-studded guest list included Amal and George Clooney, Serena Williams and Oprah Winfrey.

Meghan became the first biracial person to ever marry into the British monarchy, and her cultural identity was celebrated in ways that were groundbreaking for royal wedding traditions. An address by American preacher and Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church Michael Curry, which saw him repeatedly quote Martin Luther King, Jr. but also mention slavery, was seen by many as one of the day’s most moving highlights. A solemn version of “Stand By Me” performed by the UK Christian gospel group Kingdom Choir — again, a departure from the more classic repertoires of similar weddings — also was a standout moment.

As with most events of the kind, though, the unveiling of the bride’s dress — a closely guarded secret for months — was a scene stealer. The now Duchess of Sussex chose a modest ivory silk gown by British designer Clare Waight Keller, Givenchy’s first female artistic director.

Crazy Rich Asians became a box-office hit

A still from "Crazy Rich Asians."

A still from “Crazy Rich Asians.” Credit: IMDB/Warner Brothers

Besides “Black Panther,” the film industry had another major breakthrough this year: the release of “Crazy Rich Asians,” which hit theaters in August.

Based on the bestselling novel by Singaporean author Kevin Kwan, the adaptation marked a momentous shift for diversity in Hollywood, by starring an all-Asian cast. The last time a major Hollywood production did the same was 25 years ago, with “The Joy Luck Club” in 1993.

“Crazy Rich Asians” topped box offices, bringing in $25.2 million in the US in its opening weekend, and grossing $238 million worldwide. The film has been praised for lifting the visibility of Asian and Asian-American talent in Hollywood, at a time when the demographic remains underrepresented on big screens.
“Before [‘Crazy Rich Asians’], I hadn’t even done a tiny part in a studio film,” Constance Wu, who played the film’s lead character Rachel Chu, wrote in a message posted to Twitter, before the film’s release. “I never dreamed I would get to star in one… because I had never seen that happen to someone who looked like me. This month, Wu garnered a best actress Golden Globe nomination for her performance.
However, the film flopped in China, the world’s fastest growing film market, where it earned less than $1 million in its opening weekend, due to the lack of locally known stars and the cultural differences between mainland China and the diaspora.

Michael Kors bought Versace for $2 billion

Donatella Versace: A fashion icon ft. Lady Gaga

In September, American fashion brand Michael Kors announced the acquisition of Italian powerhouse Versace for $2.1 billion.

The deal put the spotlight on Kors’ ambitious plans for his own company, which will be renamed Capri Holdings: to create America’s first-ever luxury conglomerate (Kors also purchased Jimmy Choo in 2017).

If successful, the new group will essentially compete against European juggernauts LVMH (whose brands includes Givenchy, Fendi and Dior, among many others) and Kering (Gucci, Saint Laurent, Alexander McQueen, Balenciaga and others), aiming to disrupt luxury fashion’s current power structure.

Banksy’s work sold for $1.4M, then promptly self-destructed

Banksy’s shredded artwork renamed

In October, one of the most iconic pieces by British artist Banksy, the “Girl with Balloon (2006),” was sold for $1.4 million at a Sotheby’s auction house in London. As the gavel fell to seal the sale, however, the image began self-destructing, sucked into a shredder hidden in its frame.

“Going, going, gone…” Banksy wrote on Instagram, under an image of befuddled attendees watching the work being destroyed. The day after the incident, the artist also published a video showing how he built the paper shredder. “The urge to destroy is also a creative urge,” he wrote, quoting Picasso.

The shredded work was given the new title “Love is in the bin,” and the winning bidder — a female European collector and long-standing Sotheby’s client — announced she would keep it in its new form.

Dolce and Gabbana’s had a big China disaster

Still from one of the three promo videos released on D&G's social media accounts.

Still from one of the three promo videos released on D&G’s social media accounts. Credit: Dolce & Gabbana

Days before it was supposed to hold a major runway show in Shanghai at the end of November, Italian powerhouse Dolce & Gabbana found itself at the center of a scandal that might cost the brand its future business in China.

In an effort to promote the fashion event, the luxury label released three promotional videos on its social media accounts featuring an Asian model struggling to eat pasta, pizza and cannoli with chopsticks. The clips sparked criticism both in China and abroad, with many deeming the scenes as racist and also using outdated, patronizing and stereotypical tropes.

Things quickly worsened when screenshots of direct messages allegedly sent by Stefano Gabbana on Instagram were leaked online. The designer’s alleged rants (Gabbana has since claimed his account was hacked) revealed derogatory remarks towards China and Chinese people, and further provoked consumers in the country. A few hours after the leak, the Shanghai show was canceled. Angry social media users began posting images of D&G products in flames, or thrown in the trash, propelling a boycott that even saw e-tailers pull the label from their sites.

London Fashion Week went fur-free

Kendall Jenner walks in Burberry during London Fashion Week in London on September 17, 2018.

Kendall Jenner walks in Burberry during London Fashion Week in London on September 17, 2018. Credit: NIKLAS HALLE’N/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

An increasing number of fashion houses showed a deepened awareness towards sustainability this year, with many announcing they would no longer use animal fur in their products and collections.

The British Fashion Council (BFC) and London Fashion Week took the commitment further, by stating in September that the Spring/Summer 2019 shows (held that same month) would be completely fur free — a first for a main fashion week.

None of the 80 participating designers featured fur in their lines — although the decision wasn’t a complete ban. “The BFC survey results reflect a cultural change based on ideals and choices made by designer businesses, international brands as well as consumer sentiment,” the organization said in a statement.

New York Fashion Week woke up

Models walk the runway for the Savage X Fenty Fall/Winter 2018 fashion show during NYFW at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on September 12, 2018 in Brooklyn, NY.

Models walk the runway for the Savage X Fenty Fall/Winter 2018 fashion show during NYFW at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on September 12, 2018 in Brooklyn, NY. Credit: Brian Ach/Getty Images North America/Getty Images for Savage X Fenty

The Spring-Summer 2019 shows at New York Fashion Week in September made the event one of the edgiest, most relevant happenings of the fashion calendar this year.

Presentations showed diversity on the runway, from swim- and athleticwear label Chromat’s casting of a breast cancer survivor, a hijabi model and an amputee, among others; to Shanel Campbell’s debut with an all-black roster of models; and Marco Marco Underwear employing an all-trans line-up.

Modest fashion took center stage too, and spun a number of think pieces inspired by the designer Batsheva Hay. Designers also engaged politically, particularly in the form of tees. Luxury streetwear brand Pyer Moss — the winner of the 2018 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, and a champion of activist fashion aimed at elevating the African-American experience — had a particularly powerful array of slogan T-shirts that read “See Us Now?” and “Stop Calling 911 On The Culture.”

Rihanna also made headlines by closing the week with a show for her lingerie and intimates line Savage X Fenty, an inspiring celebration of womanhood in all forms, body types and race, and a critical success.

David Hockney made art history

David Hockney painting sells for $90M, smashing auction records

A David Hockney painting of two men, one swimming in a turquoise pool, the other watching from the side, fetched $90 million at a Christie’s auction in New York in November, breaking the auction record for a living artist.

Titled “Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures),” the work dates back to 1972, when it was first sold by Hockney’s New York dealer for just $18,000 — a sale the artist still feels bittersweet about.

Hockney told CNN the painting was inspired by the accidental juxtaposition of “two photographs on my studio floor, one of (former boyfriend Peter Schlesinger) and another of a swimmer, and they were just lying there and I put them together.”

This selection of events was edited by the CNN Style team.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Evers Taps Cole as WI’s First African American DNR Secretary

Wisconsin Ag News Headlines

Evers Taps Cole as WI’s First African American DNR Secretary
Wisconsin Ag Connection – 12/20/2018


Governor-elect Tony Evers has announced his first four cabinet appointments this week, which includes the selection of Preston Cole as Natural Resources secretary. Cole currently serves as the commissioner of the Milwaukee Department of Neighborhood
Services and drew distinction for becoming the first African American forester hired by the Conservation Department.

He previously served as the operations director for the City of Milwaukee Department of Public Works, where he was responsible for 2,400 employees and running a budget of $300 million. He also served as the former Parks Superintendent for the City of St.
Louis, as well as a Resource Forester for the Missouri Department of Conservation.

“Words cannot express how humbled and honored I am to serve as the secretary of the Department of Natural Resources,” Cole said. “As a natural resource professional, I endeavor to work tirelessly to serve the citizens of Wisconsin by restoring our rich
history of conservation.”

Evers said in a statement that his goal is to ensure that his team brings science back to the DNR after Democrats have long contended that the Walker administration became too lenient on environmental regulations.

Cole holds a bachelor degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia in forest management.

Other cabinet appointments include Joel Brennan as Department of Administration secretary; Kevin Carr as Department of Corrections secretary; and Sara Meaney as Department of Tourism secretary.

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People Who Died in 2018

Screen Shot20181218At5 23 03PMIllustration: Greg HoustonWith the nationally broadcast send-off for President George H.W. Bush only just in the rearview mirror, and with the calendar’s impending turnover to 2019 just a couple weeks ahead, it’s that time of year when the notable deaths of 2018 will be aggregated and slideshow-ed for consumption on your favorite mobile device.

You will read about and remember Anthony Bourdain and Stephen Hillenburg and Aretha Franklin and Stan Lee and William Goldman and Paul Allen and Mac Miller and other luminaries whose deaths were of general and widespread interest. What’s offered here is different. Yes, these people also died in 2018, but their deaths largely didn’t vault from the obit pages of The New York Times or Washington Post, where notable deaths are chronicled in beautiful and regular fashion, or from the obit pages of the daily papers of cities where these folks lived and worked. Their endings may not have merited a CNN chyron or Twitter Moment headline, but that they were lesser known doesn’t mean they aren’t worth remembering.

PichuEmily “Mount Fiji” DoleIllustration: Greg Houston

Emily “Mount Fiji” Dole

Pioneer of female professional wrestling // Sept. 28, 1957–Jan. 2, 2018

In the late 1980s, to reach the peak of women’s professional wrestling was to be among the cast members on the hit sports show GLOW: The Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling. Hitting the airwaves in 1986, the all-female wrestling program consisted of women assigned flamboyantly cartoonish alter egos that couldn’t have been further from political correctness, like Matilda the Hun, Babe the Farmer’s Daughter and the tag team Hollywood & Vine.

Considering the stress they put on their bodies, the female wrestling pioneers practically worked for free, making between $300 and $700 a week. There were no dental benefits, just the risk of losing teeth in the ring; no medical insurance for the inevitable broken collarbones and concussions. Their only guarantee at the end of the day was pain and exasperation — and, when the bright lights dimmed and the roar subsided, the glory.

But among the many talented ladies who initially scratched the surface of women in professional wrestling, none of them are remembered quite like the one they dubbed “Mountain Fiji.” Legend has it Emily “Mount Fiji” Dole never lost a match, which makes sense when you consider that she stood 5 feet, 11 inches tall and weighed in at 350 pounds.

A proud Samoan American woman, an actress by any fair definition, an accomplished athlete, Dole was by far the most recognizable character on GLOW, with her tree trunk-like arms and shoulders as wide as a volcano’s outer rim. Prior to her time as a professional wrestler, Dole was remembered for her ability to toss a shotput more than 50 feet as a teenager at Buena Park High School in California — a feat that’s been repeated just twice by other California high school girls since. Later on, Dole qualified for two Olympic track and field trials, where she finished fifth in 1976 and seventh in 1980. Netflix’s current fictionalized tribute to the pioneering wrestling league features a Samoan American wrestler named Carmen “Machu Picchu” Wade, played by Britney Young, a clear tribute to Dole’s legacy.

In her final years, Dole dealt with a number of health problems, many of which were born out of her career in wrestling, and had been staying in an assisted living facility. By 2008, her weight had begun to get the best of her as she climbed up to 425 pounds, although she would later cut it back down to 235 pounds.

But like all volcanoes, though it had erupted hundreds of times within the wrestling ring, the fire inside her would inevitably lay dormant. On Jan. 2, 2018, Dole passed away from unknown complications. She was 60 years old. — Xander Peters

BoppThomas BoppIllustration: Greg Houston

Thomas Bopp

Amateur astronomer and discoverer of Comet Hale-Bopp // Oct. 15, 1949–Jan. 5, 2018

Thomas Bopp wasn’t looking for a comet when he peered into a telescope on Saturday, July 22, 1995. In fact, he wasn’t looking for anything. By day, the 47-year-old worked for a cement company, where he made a passing mention of his interest in astronomy to Jim Stevens, who ran an auto parts store in Phoenix. It was a hobby started when Bopp was just a boy growing up in Youngstown, Ohio, when his father gave him his first telescope. Stevens, it turned out, was also interested in telescopes. By night, the two became amateur astronomers, going stargazing with Stevens’ homemade telescope in the Arizona desert, with Stevens serving as Bopp’s mentor.

That was exactly what they were doing that night, when Stevens trained his lens on a cluster of stars in the Sagittarius constellation shortly after 11 p.m. Stevens was eager for Bopp to take a look. But what he didn’t realize was he had aimed his telescope directly at an unidentified flying object — what Bopp would later describe as “a little fuzzy glow.”

In reality, it was a 46-mile-wide hunk of ice 577 million miles away, hurtling through space toward Earth.

The stakes were high — comets are a coveted catch for astronomers, since they are conventionally named after those who discover them. But first Bopp and Stevens had to notify Harvard University to officiate the discovery. This was not an easy task in the Arizona desert in the ’90s.

After studying the object for several minutes to make sure it was not a star, Bopp got in his car and drove 20 miles to a truck stop to try and call Western Union from a pay phone to send a telegram to the Central Bureau of the International Astronomical Union at Harvard University, because yes, you could still send telegrams in the ’90s. The Western Union representative didn’t have an address, so Bopp hung up and got in his car and drove home. Around 3 a.m., he barged into his bedroom, woke his wife, found the address in an astronomy book, and sent the telegram with the comet’s coordinates.

The next morning, Bopp got a call from the International Astronomical Union. Unbeknownst to Bopp, another astronomer — a real astronomer, Alan Hale, with a doctorate in astronomy and everything — had also spotted the comet within minutes of him, and had already emailed the coordinates to Harvard from his home in New Mexico. But once again, the stars aligned for Bopp: By what he later described as “bizarre chance,” an IAU associate director happened to be in the office that Sunday and received the telegram. The comet, formally designated C/1995 O1, would be named Hale-Bopp, after both astronomers.

Bopp quit his day job to attend to the media maelstrom that followed. In 1997, the comet reached perihelion, or its closest point to the sun. It lit up the night sky for more than 18 months, its long tail visible to the naked eye to millions of people in the Northern Hemisphere. It was the biggest, most visible comet since the Great Comet of 1811.

The comet brought some misfortune, too. In March ’97, 39 members of California death cult Heaven’s Gate committed mass suicide, believing their bodies would be transported to an alien spacecraft following the comet. In the spring, when the comet was the closest to the Earth, Bopp’s brother and sister-in-law were killed by a car while photographing the comet. “This has been the best week of my life,” he told National Geographic. “And the worst.”

In recent years, Bopp worked as a shuttle driver at a Toyota dealership. He died at a hospital in Phoenix at age 68 from liver failure.

“I can find another job, but this is something that happens once in 10,000 lifetimes,” he told Newsweek when he quit his job to bask in the glow of Hale-Bopp. The comet is expected to next pass Earth in 4897. — Lee DeVito

UrsulaUrsula K. Le GuinIllustration: Greg Houston

Ursula K. Le Guin

Trailblazing speculative novelist // Oct. 21, 1929–Jan. 22, 2018

More than 20 novels, not counting several of her earliest works that remain unpublished. A dozen books on poetry. More than 100 short stories, collected throughout multiple volumes. Seven essay collections. Thirteen books for children. Five volumes of translation, including The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu and selected poems by the Chilean Nobel Prize winner Gabriela Mistral. Oh, and a guide for writers.

Even stingily speaking, the career of author Ursula K. Le Guin — one of the 20th century’s pioneering science fiction and young adult writers — was prolific. Arguably her most enduring work, The Left Hand of Darkness, inspired legions of genre writers, including contemporary savants such as Neil Gaiman, J.K. Rowling, John Scalzi and the widely acclaimed Margaret Atwood, author of The Handmaid’s Tale. Some critics argue that no single work did more to upend the genre’s seemingly predictable conventions than that of the Nebula and Hugo Award-winning novel, which imagined a world whose human inhabitants have no fixed gender; instead, their sexual roles are determined by context and express themselves only once a month. She would later refer to the story as a “thought experiment.” “I eliminated gender to find out what was left,” Le Guin told The Guardian in 2005. It remains one of speculative fiction’s academic touchstones to this day.

The only daughter of two anthropologists, Ursula Kroeber was born the youngest of four children in Berkeley, California, in 1929. Her father studied Native American tribes based in California, while her mother, Theodora Kracaw Kroeber, gained prominence in the same field with her acclaimed book Ishi in Two Worlds, which chronicled the life and death of the state’s “last wild Indian.” Throughout her youth, with dinner-table talk of lost worlds never far out of earshot, Le Guin would use her family’s deep understanding of the world as a jumping-off point as she immersed herself in mythology, classic fantasies and the science fiction magazines of the day.

In 1951, she graduated from Radcliffe College, then earned a master’s degree in romance literature from Columbia University in 1952. From there, Le Guin was awarded a Fulbright fellowship to study in Paris. While aboard a steamer set for France, she met the historian Charles Le Guin, whom she married a few months later. Later in life, the two would settle down and start a family in Portland, Oregon, where they lived in a Victorian house on a steep street just below the city’s Forest Park. As the Paris Review noted during an interview with Le Guin in 2013, perhaps appropriately for a science fiction author and much like the worlds she’d bend within her fiction’s narratives, their home appeared “larger on the inside than it does from without.”

On Jan. 22, 2018, with one last conflict within a story to resolve, Le Guin passed away peacefully at her home in Portland. Her family did not cite a cause other than poor health due to old age. Le Guin was 88 years old. — Xander Peters

SmithMark E. SmithIllustration: Greg Houston

Mark E. Smith

Irascible frontman of The Fall // March 5, 1957–Jan. 24, 2018

“If it’s me and your granny on bongos, then it’s a Fall gig.”

A young Mark E. Smith started The Fall in the Manchester suburb of Prestwich after the infamous 1976 Sex Pistols show in Manchester that inspired the majority of attendees to start bands the next day. It was the only time in his life that Smith would (unwittingly) succumb to Rock cliché. He spent the next 40 years trying his best to dismantle Rock & Roll and the music industry from the inside.

Though he looked like an ill-tempered postal clerk or substitute teacher, Smith was Punk and disorderly to the very core. With The Fall, he built a sound antithetical to the idea of musical proficiency, favoring instead spontaneity and creative tension, laced it with biting, clever, often poetic lyrics, and ended up with something every bit as inspirational as Gang of Four or Wire. The Fall was a band that (to its horror, perhaps) influenced generations of Punk, New Wave and Alternative Rock bands, and Smith became a de facto role model to those for whom the underground was more than just a temporary lifestyle choice. What other Post Punk band had enough cultural cachet to score a major label record deal (again), during the Grunge revolution of the 1990s?

The unforgettable songs and anthems piled up like discarded ex-band members (a cohort over 60 strong, all told) — “Totally Wired,” “Mr. Pharmacist,” “The Classical,” “Hip Priest,” “Glam Racket,” “There’s a Ghost in My House,” “Big New Prinz.” Did you ever hear The Fall’s cover of Disco standard “Lost In Music”? If the albums aren’t enough to slake your thirst, The Fall recorded 20-plus live sessions with equally legendary British DJ John Peel over the BBC’s public radio airwaves between 1978 and 2004.

Despite this fearsome productivity, Smith kept The Fall proudly “unprofessional.” If during a concert Smith would drink himself into oblivion, unplug an amp (or five), mess up keyboard settings, change up the setlist or recruit a new drummer 15 minutes before showtime, what of it? As Smith himself barked, it’s just “creative management, cock!” Smith was The Fall’s only constant member during the band’s 40-plus years of intense creative drive (they were contemporaries of Joy Division, just to put things in perspective): one or more albums a year, restless, constantly changing music, grueling touring schedules that have the logistical sense of darts thrown at a map of the world and a bandleader who apparently hasn’t eaten solid food in decades (subsisting on a liquid diet, as they say) dedicated to spontaneity, conflict and uncertainty in day-to-day business affairs.

Smith anecdotes are almost as legion as Fall anthems, suffused with a sui generis cranky mystique. There’s the apocryphal story of him catching some of his bandmates dancing to “Rock the Casbah” at an afterparty in the ’80s and summarily delivering slaps to every offender or when he almost singlehandedly bottled Mumford & Sons off the stage in the early ’00s; the time he fired a sound engineer for eating a salad and fired a drummer on the unlucky percussionist’s wedding day; or when he agreed to play on British show Later… with Jools Holland with the contractual condition that the titular host not play “Boogie Woogie piano anywhere near The Fall.”

His neverending embrace of chaos and tension had an ugly side to it; he could be vile and abusive to those closest to him. And yet, most remained loyal, believing in their flawed leader’s vision, like the long-suffering Hanley brothers and, of course, Smith’s most famous creative foil, guitarist and ex-wife Brix Smith. After Smith, Brix was the most iconic member of The Fall, a glammed-up American Punk who contributed unforgettable serrated riffs to pivotal albums like The Wonderful and Frightening World of The Fall and The Frenz Experiment. Photos and video from her tenure in The Fall are essential and electrifying viewing, like transmissions from a strange alternate future. Their breakup was equally as seismic, though she rejoined the band for a brief time in the 1990s.

Smith died at 60 after a long battle with cancer, but was still doing shows, in a wheelchair, in the year before he passed and never ceased writing and releasing music regularly. There will likely never be a Pop star quite like him again. — Matthew Moyer

BurdenGary BurdenIllustration: Greg Houston

Gary Burden

Essential album cover artist of the 1970s // May 23, 1933–March 7, 2018

If you dig classic Folk Rock, you probably remember the cover of Joni Mitchell’s Blue album, a close-up, high-contrast midnight-blue portrait of Mitchell gazing downward. It’s melancholic and rich and, most of all, it evokes feeling in the viewer. Gary Burden designed that. The former architect was a sought-after album designer starting in the late ’60s for many a Rock & Roller, from Mitchell, The Doors and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young to current artists like Conor Oberst, best known for his work in the emotive Indie Folk project Bright Eyes.

“Gary always wanted the album packaging to reflect the spirit of the music and the wishes of the artists as much as possible,” Oberst said about Burden in a recent article in The New York Times. “He was often at odds with record labels when they sought to cut costs at the expense of what he and the artist had envisioned. Gary usually won those battles.”

While studying architecture at UC Berkeley, Burden met Cass Elliot of the Mamas and the Papas, who would ultimately be the one to turn him on to designing album covers for a living. “I met her and she asked me to do a remodel of her home in Laurel Canyon,” Burden said in a 2015 video interview with NPR’s World Café. “So she’s the one who said, ‘You know, Gary, you should make our new cover; you know how to design stuff.”

The rest, you could say, is history. After a lifetime of contributing his own art to the music community, Burden died this year on March 7. No cause was given.

As time seems to slip faster beneath us and technology speeds the world up, Burden’s death is a reminder to slow down and look at the details; feel the textures and edges and maybe sit with — and breathe with — a piece of album art. It’ll most likely enhance the entire musical experience. — Chris Conde

LermaArnie LermaIllustration: Greg Houston

Arnie Lerma

Ex-Scientologist who became Scientology’s fiercest critic // Nov. 18, 1950–March 16, 2018

Ever heard the story of Xenu, the genocidal alien dictator who, when faced with overpopulation troubles 75 million years ago, brought billions of his subjects to Earth to execute them with a lethal combination of volcanoes and hydrogen bombs, leaving their disembodied spirits to cling to humans, only to be removed through the teachings of the Church of Scientology? If so, you can thank Arnie Lerma.

Arnaldo Pagliarini Lerma was born in Washington, D.C. in 1950, to a mother who was an executive secretary to the Sudanese ambassador and a father who was a Mexican agriculture official — and who divorced months after his birth, according to Lerma’s autobiography. His mother was a Scientology official in the D.C. church around 1968, about three decades after American science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard published the first texts that would form the basis of his new religion, Scientology. By the time Lerma joined Scientology at 16 at the urging of his mother, the church had been banned in several Australian states and stripped of its tax-exempt status by the IRS, which deemed it a commercial operation for Hubbard’s benefit — though a U.S. appeals court later recognized it as a religion in 1969.

Lerma signed a “billion-year contract” to serve in Scientology’s elite Sea Org, a paramilitary force that some have described as a totalitarian organization, according to the Washington Post. But his status among fellow Scientologists changed when Lerma and Hubbard’s daughter, Suzette, fell in love (a claim that has been strongly disputed by the church). Lerma’s entanglement with Scientology ended after other Sea Org members allegedly threatened to mutilate him if he didn’t cancel his elopement with Suzette Hubbard.

Exiled from the religion that had been his home for years, Lerma became one of Scientology’s fiercest critics. By 1994, he was posting public court documents involving the church online in the alt.religion.scientology newsgroup that “included testimony from former church officials who describe Scientology as a dangerous cult that brainwashes and blackmails its member and harasses defectors and critics,” which earned him intimidating visits from men in dark suits at his Arlington home, according to the Post. In 1995, Lerma was the first to post the “Fishman Affidavit” — documents submitted by ex-Scientologist Steven Fishman that included criticisms of the church as well as the doctrine of Xenu, which Scientology officials argued was copyrighted and a trade secret.

The church accused Lerma of copyright infringement and trade secret misappropriation, leading to a raid of his home by federal marshals, Scientology attorneys and data technicians. The church’s Religious Technology Center (RTC) sued Lerma, his internet service provider and Post reporters for quoting the affidavit. A federal judge found the reporters had not violated copyright for quoting a publicly available court document, but Lerma was held liable for a small number of non-willful copyright violations and ordered to pay a $2,500 penalty. The court, though, stated it was convinced “that the primary motivation of RTC in suing Lerma, DGS and the Post is to stifle criticism of Scientology in general and to harass its critics,” according to the 1995 ruling.

Lerma continued his crusade against Scientology on his website, Lermanet, which became a resource for other critics, and gave interviews on the subject in print news stories, television and radio.

On March 16, Lerma, 67, shot his wife, Ginger Sugerman, in the face with a handgun at their Georgia home before killing himself, according to the local newspaper, the Sylvania Telephone. Sugerman, 58, survived and told Tony Ortega — the former Village Voice editor who runs The Underground Bunker, a site that keeps a sharp eye on the world of Scientology — that her husband was taking oxycodone in his last months to deal with back pain and that his paranoia had increased. Ortega last reported that Sugerman, also a former Scientologist, was raising funds for her continuing surgeries and for efforts to honor Lerma’s work, despite his last atrocity. — Monivette Cordeiro

LeiberJudith LeiberIllustration: Greg Houston

Judith Leiber

Holocaust survivor and designer of extravagant handbags // Jan. 11, 1921–April 28, 2018

If you can’t connect the dots between the words “handbag” and “art,” you’re probably not versed in the distinctive work of Judith Leiber, the late Hungarian designer who took a signature concept — whimsical metal clutches adorned with Swarovski crystals and semi-precious stones — and ran with it in vivid fashion for decades while carving her own niche in the fashion world.

Born Judit Peto into a Jewish family in Budapest in 1921, she escaped the worst atrocities of the Holocaust — thanks in part to a Swiss letter of protection her father managed to obtain — and weathered World War II in a Budapest apartment in the Jewish ghetto reportedly shared by 26 people. Although aimed for a job in the cosmetics industry, she instead broke the mold and became the first woman to work at the Hungarian Handbag Guild, where she perfected design and fabrication skills from the ground up. In 1945, while selling her own handmade purses on the side, she met Gerson “Gus” Leiber, a Brooklyn-born Army sergeant and modernist painter stationed in Budapest. By 1947, they were married and living in New York City.

In New York, she worked for handbag manufacturers and hit an early career high in 1953 when First Lady Mamie Eisenhower arrived at the Inaugural Ball carrying a small, bedazzled clutch crafted by Leiber. Although the credit went to her employer (designer Nettie Rosenstein), this turn of events foreshadowed a trend of powerful women — from queens and movie stars to first ladies Lady Bird Johnson, Nancy Reagan, Barbara Bush, Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush — clutching Leiber’s shimmering creations at high-profile events.

In 1963, the couple officially dove into the luxury handbag business together via Judith Leiber Inc., with Gerson on the business end and Judith handling design, fabrication and marketing.

In the decades that followed Leiber took her playful, over-the-top aesthetic to the limit while challenging the confines of minaudières — decorated metal clutches only big enough to carry what she summed up as “a handkerchief, lipstick and a $100 bill.” Collaborative efforts involving sculptors, painters, jewelers and artisans in the U.S. and Italy, Leiber’s imaginative bags can take a year to complete and typically cost somewhere between $4,000 and $8,000, with made-to-order couture pieces ringing in closer to $20,000.

Beyond meticulous attention to detail and unapproachable price tags, one of the most remarkable aspects of Leiber’s work is the juxtaposition of refined materials and techniques with nostalgic, childlike, even lowbrow themes and concepts. Nevertheless her unapologetically extravagant minaudières — which have taken shape in dazzling cupcakes, ladybugs, cameras, cell phones, bundles of asparagus, Tutankhamun-inspired monkeys, burgers, fries and cocktails — have long been slyly witty staples for A-list celebrities on often-humorless red carpets.

Although the Leibers sold their business in 1993 for a reported $16 million (Judith stayed on board as designer until 1997), the Judith Leiber brand is still intact and active, offering a reverent continuum of the 5,000-plus designs its co-founder created throughout her colorful career. In 2005, Judith and Gerson opened the Leiber Collection in Springs, New York, to “house their works of art and to chronicle their careers.” While both are represented in major museum collections (he’s in the Museum of Modern Art and the Brooklyn Museum, she’s in the Smithsonian and the Met), the Leibers were thoughtfully showcased side-by-side in a trio of recent exhibitions while they were both in their 90s. After 72 years of marriage, Judith and Gerson died at home within hours of one another, both from heart attacks, on April 28, 2018.

As for the shimmering body of work she began building long before “bling” was even a blip on Merriam-Webster’s radar, Judith Leiber presented her intricate evening bags as defiant status symbols, conceptual confections and wacky conversation pieces. All you need to enjoy one is a big bank account, a sense of humor sized to match and, as Leiber once suggested, an escort to carry the items that don’t fit in your minaudière. — Bryan Rindfuss

SnoddyGlenn SnoddyIllustration: Greg Houston

Glenn Snoddy

Recording engineer and inventor of the fuzz tone // May 4, 1922-May 21, 2018

Glenn Snoddy’s contribution to the world of music wasn’t a song or a style of playing. It was more like he helped discover a new color.

A recording engineer in Nashville in the early 1960s, Snoddy helped capture and recreate what is commonly called “fuzz tone,” the distorted, overdriven effect that helped shape the sound of modern Rock & Roll.

And it was all, quite literally, by accident.

Already a recording veteran (he’d worked on pivotal sessions for Patsy Cline, Hank Williams and Johnny Cash), Snoddy was manning the console for a session with producer Don Law and Country singer Marty Robbins, who was recording his 1961 single “Don’t Worry.” A broken amplifier that the bass was running through created a dirty sound about halfway into the recording that caught the attention of everyone working on the track.

“The transformer in the amplifier blew up,” Snoddy told Murfreesboro, Tennessee’s Daily News Journal in 2016 about the happy accident. The bassist (Country and Rockabilly session guitarist Grady Martin) reportedly wanted to redo his part, but Law and Snoddy insisted it remain.

After its release, “Don’t Worry” went to No. 1 on Billboard’s singles chart and musicians in particular loved the buzzy sound. Snoddy says Nancy Sinatra was in Nashville and wanted that exact sound for a recording session, but by that point the original “broken” amp had completely died. So he began figuring out how to recreate the fuzz, designing and building a preamp effects box to capitalize on the curiosity. He sold the design to Gibson, which turned it into the Maestro Fuzz-Tone FZ-1, the first commercially available guitar distortion pedal.

While the distorted guitar sound was pioneered by players like Howlin’ Wolf guitarist Willie Lee Johnson and Link Wray (most notably on the revolutionary 1958 instrumental hit “Rumble”) in the decade leading up to his invention, Snoddy was the first to capture that fuzzy lightning in a bottle (or, rather, box). The Gibson pedal (which initially sold for $40) wasn’t an immediate hit and the company ramped down production of them until 1965, when Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards used his FZ-1 on the band’s seminal hit, “Satisfaction.” Gibson sold 40,000 pedals in the wake of that song’s success, after reportedly moving a grand total of three over the course of the previous two years.

The fuzz tone sound became the foundation of ’60s and ’70s Rock & Roll, leading the way for other popular pedals, including the Fuzz Face, beloved by Jimi Hendrix and Pete Townshend, and the Big Muff, which saw a revival in the late ’80s/early ’90s, the key to the guitar sounds of bands like Mudhoney, Smashing Pumpkins and many other Alternative Rock acts of the time.

Snoddy, who’d later open Nashville’s Woodland Sound recording studio (home to many important sessions, including the one for the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band’s “Will the Circle Be Unbroken”), died on May 21. He was 96. — Mike Breen

DabneyTed DabneyIllustration: Greg Houston

Ted Dabney

Electronics engineer and co-founder of Atari // May 2, 1937–May 26, 2018

In the beginning was a word. And the word was pizza.

Pizza parlors, to be exact — the ones lit by the blinking screens of arcade cabinets and populated by animatronic critters. In the mid-1960s, such establishments only existed in ambitious schemes cooked up by Ted Dabney and Nolan Bushnell, two friends then employed as engineers by California-based electronics company Ampex.

Dabney agreed to join Bushnell in his business venture, which combined the former’s technological and electronics expertise (gained in the ’50s at the Navy’s electronics school on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay) with the latter’s unbridled creativity and experience working as a carnival barker during college.

Unsurprisingly, the duo’s initial efforts failed to bear the intended fruit (or dough, for that matter), but they did mark the genesis of electronic gaming as a cultural institution. What started out as a far-fetched dream would soon become a household name: Atari.

At the time, coin-operated arcade cabinets were largely analog machines: pinball, fortune tellers, skee-ball. Dabney and Bushnell were intent on replicating the mechanical complexity of these games first on a computer, and later on a television set. Programming and buying computers was cost-prohibitive, so Dabney — inspired by how a TV set’s vertical and horizontal move the picture back and forth — devised a way to move digital shapes across a screen using a universal platform that was cheaper to build and easier to manage and store.

“Ted came up with the breakthrough idea that got rid of the computer so you didn’t have to have a computer to make the game work,” one of Atari’s first employees, Allan Alcorn, told the New York Times in June. “It created the industry.”

Bushnell pitched the new motion circuit technology to arcade manufacturer Nutting Associates, who helped the duo produce the first-ever commercially-available coin-operated cabinet video game, Computer Space, in 1971.

The sci-fi themed game netted Dabney and Bushnell enough royalties to found their own company, first called Syzygy and quickly renamed Atari. The company broke into the mainstream in 1972 with the release of Pong, a simplified departure from Computer Space that simulated table tennis with two lines and a dot. By the end of 1974, Atari sold more than 8,000 units of the game at $937 a pop.

Unfortunately, Dabney reaped a much smaller reward than his partner. He learned that Bushnell had applied for a patent without his consent, submitting Dabney’s designs under his own name. Bushnell’s charisma pushed Dabney to a lower rung of Atari, leaving him frustrated enough to sell his ownership for $250,000 in 1973.

Disillusioned by the perils of success, Dabney largely bowed out of the industry. In the meantime, Bushnell pushed Atari into living rooms with a series of video consoles. In the late ’70s, Bushnell enlisted Dabney to help develop a new venture — a restaurant-slash-arcade called Pizza Time, later renamed Chuck E. Cheese’s. After further disputes split the pair up again, Dabney retreated from the entertainment industry for good.

Dabney died of esophageal cancer on May 26. — Jude Noel

VladVladimir VoinovichIllustration: Greg Houston

Vladimir Voinovich

Soviet dissident and dystopian satirist // Sept. 26, 1932–July 27, 2018

By the time of his death, Vladimir Voinovich was never mentioned without some variation of his title: satirist. Sometimes it was “famed satirist” or even “master satirist.” But the Russian writer, who spent his life alternatively fleeing and critiquing his homeland’s leaders, told interviewers that he found the label exasperating. He saw himself as a realist.

“What I describe here is only what I saw with my own eyes,” Voinovich writes in the introduction of his dystopian epic Moscow 2042.

Of course the book, described by one reviewer as “the Soviet Catch-22,” is a ridiculous piece of fiction. The novel follows Russian dissident writer Vitaly Kartsev, who essentially functions as Voinovich’s stand-in as he bumbles his way into a time-traveling expedition 60 years into the future. He arrives in a Moscow governed as a city-state by “pure Communism,” a system wherein bathrooms are under the jurisdiction of the “Bureau of Natural Functions” and newspapers are printed directly on toilet paper.

Above it all is the Generalissimo — a strongman keeping the population under control on the combined strength of religious dogma, a ludicrous cult of personality and the secret police.

The book was a hit in the West when it was published in 1987 (it was banned in Soviet Russia). Decades later, contemporary scholars noted that the novel’s dystopian merger of the KGB, the Communist state and the church foreshadowed the rise of Vladimir Putin, creating a reality with odd parallels to the fictional Moscow of 2042.

Voinovich noticed the similarity too. “I think it’s pretty close,” he admitted to The Daily Beast in 2015.

By then, he had already lived many disparate roles: Born to a Jewish mother and journalist father, he served as a loyal Soviet soldier in World War II, a wannabe poet under Stalin, a dissident writer under Khrushchev and then a satirist in exile in West Germany, where he penned Moscow 2042. Welcomed home during the presidency of Mikhail Gorbachev, he finally attained acceptance in his own homeland.

And then, like an absurdist plot in one of Voinovich’s own works, Putin took control. Once again, Voinovich became an outspoken dissident, as the author rebuked the regime’s repression of the media and political opponents, as well as the war in Chechnya.

Indeed, Voinovich managed to live long enough to become his own sort of time traveler. In his final years, he witnessed a backsliding Russia controlled by bureaucrats who projected breathtaking confidence in their leader, even as the country’s hard-won freedoms unraveled under that leader’s fist.

“Next time, I’ll write a utopia,” Voinovich joked to an American crowd a few years ago. “People keep saying that all the bad things I write come true, so I’m going to write something good.”

Instead, he suffered a heart attack. The master satirist died July 28. He left his prophetic gifts for the next generation of dissidents and trouble-makers — and stories of comic authoritarianism that, with each passing headline, seem less and less fantastical. — Danny Wicentowski

CarlilseMary CarlisleIllustration: Greg Houston

Mary Carlisle

“Baby Star” who made more than 60 films in a decade // Feb. 3, 1914-Aug. 1, 2018

A radiant 1930s film ingénue known for her fresh face, porcelain skin and blonde hair, Mary Carlisle appeared in more than 60 films in the course of her short career, everything from Bing Crosby crooners to B-movie horror films — the last of which was the low-budget vampire thriller Dead Men Walk, released in 1943.

Born Gwendolyn Witter in Boston in 1912 or 1914 — according to the Washington Post, she would frequently say her true age was “none of your business” — she was discovered at 14 while eating lunch at Universal Studios with her mother. Studio executive Carl Laemmle Jr. saw her and demanded she be given a screen test, reportedly saying, “This girl has the most angelic face I ever saw.” But it wasn’t until after she completed her formal education — and bluffed her way into a chorus girl casting call at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, thanks to her uncle Robert’s film connections — that she pursued a career on the silver screen.

Her first part was an uncredited appearance in the Academy Award-winning 1932 drama Grand Hotel, starring Joan Crawford, Greta Garbo and John Barrymore.

That same year she was named a “Baby Star” — a PR designation for budding starlets deemed to be on the cusp of a big film career — by the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers, but Carlisle never found the same success as other “stars” like Clara Bow, the aforementioned Crawford or Ginger Rogers.

Continuously typecast as a wholesome virgin or upbeat gal in everything from college sports dramas to screwball musicals, including three with Crosby in a span of five years, Carlisle eventually retired from cinema after marrying British actor James Blakeley in 1942. “I’ve played sweet young heroines long enough,” she said.

After her acting career, Carlisle managed the Elizabeth Arden salon in Beverly Hills. She died at the age of 104 (or 106, depending on who you ask) at the Motion Picture and Television Fund retirement community for actors in Woodland Hills, California. — Maija Zummo

WahooChief WahooIllustration: Greg Houston

Chief Wahoo

Cleveland Indians mascot and racial flashpoint // 1947-2018

Chief Wahoo, the racist red-faced symbol that has adorned the sleeves and ballcaps of the Cleveland Indians’ uniforms — not to mention the apparel and doodads of Cleveland baseball fans — since 1947, has succumbed at last to his inevitable fate, possibly timed to Cleveland’s imminent date in the national spotlight with the 2019 MLB All-Star Game.

A much-floated and entirely plausible theory is that MLB commissioner Rob Manfred, a vocal opponent of Wahoo’s continued use, told Cleveland the summer showcase would only be bestowed on the city if the offensive symbol was no longer around. MLB’s very public announcement of deliberations between the team and the league on the Wahoo front in advance of the All-Star game announcement lent a certain undeniable credence to the conjecture.

In recent years, the team had “scaled back” the use of Wahoo in favor of a primary “Block C” logo, but the image was still beloved among diehard fans, prominent in the team shop and regularly worn by the team.

Team owner Paul Dolan announced last year, though, that Wahoo at last would be eliminated, at least as an official logo on the team’s uniforms. Given MLB’s visible crusade, Dolan, who had over the years acknowledged Wahoo’s problematic existence and reception outside of the city, could at least save face with ardent Wahoo supporters — many of whom now wear “Keep the Chief” or “Long Live the Chief” apparel to games — by saying it was Major League Baseball, not the Indians, who was to blame.

Last year, the logo was paraded around for the full season, an outlandish farewell tour for a symbol that most everyone outside of Cleveland has long acknowledged represents an enduring harm to Native American communities. It was and is a grotesque caricature that belongs in a museum, if not a garbage can.

Chief Wahoo first appeared in 1947, created by cartoonist Walter Goldbach, who was only 17 at the time. (Goldblach died in 2017.) The image was meant to “convey a spirit of pure joy and unbridled enthusiasm,” at a time when Native American racism was still rampant. The team name was “inspired” by former Native American player Louis Sockalexis, in the sense that fans enjoyed taunting and jeering him for the duration of his very brief career, one cut short by alcoholism. That is the legacy that current Wahoo apologists so passionately claim to be honoring.

In 1951, the logo evolved into the Red Sambo still in use today. His death is mourned and protested by thousands of Clevelanders who believe that professional baseball has been infiltrated by snowflake social justice warriors and race hucksters who are promoting racism where none exists for their own political and financial gain.

The Chief is unfortunately survived on the professional sporting stage by the Washington Redskins’ name and by dozens, if not hundreds, of similarly offensive logos and nicknames of high schools across the country. — Sam Allard

BluiettHamiet BluiettIllustration: Greg Houston

Hamiet Bluiett

Progressive Jazz titan // Sept. 16, 1940–Oct. 4, 2018

Hamiet Bluiett, a master of the unwieldy baritone sax as well as the more nimble clarinet, served as a living bridge between Blues-based, pre-bebop traditionalism and progressive, improvisational Jazz.

Bluiett came into the world in similarly significant liminal territory — he was born in St. Louis, Missouri, but raised directly across the river in Brooklyn, Illinois, the first town in the United States incorporated by African Americans. At age 4 he began piano lessons; at 9, clarinet studies; and in college at Southern Illinois University, he took up the baritone saxophone. He left college without graduating, but with an abiding admiration for the bari sax. 

“I fell in love with the instrument on first sight, even before I knew what it sounded like,” he said in a 1991 interview. “But I never thought its mission was to mumble in the back row. I thought it should be a lead voice.”

By many accounts, Bluiett was a mass of contradictions: Despite forging new paths in the St. Louis and New York loft Jazz scenes, he remained always committed to melody. His idol was not a bebop pioneer like Parker (neither Charlie nor Leo) but Harry Carney, a baritone saxophonist in Duke Ellington’s band.

Even while he was a blazing star in the avant-garde loft scene, Bluiett respected popular appeal, saying things like, “We should play more music for women, play stuff that children like, old people, the whole works — what’s wrong with all that?

“I was one of the guys, when we went into the loft situation, I told the guys, ‘Man, we need to play some ballads. You all playing outside, you running people away. I don’t want to run people away.’”

He founded the forward-thinking World Saxophone Quartet and the Black Artists Group, and played with iconic improvisers including Sam Rivers, Babatunde Olatunji and Charles Mingus. His work in WSQ and BAG was influenced not just by the Soul and R&B he grew up with, but by West African musics and hocket-style call and response. Yet had he chosen a more commercial path, his diamond-hard, satin-smooth clarinet tone would have fit right into a traditional big band à la Ellington.

The controlled fury of his baritone attack was matched by a crusty demeanor and raspy voice. (Bassist Kent Kessler recalls a set at the Chicago Jazz Fest in which Bluiett was to improvise with the DKV Trio; there was no rehearsal, no discussion, Bluiett simply showed up onstage, stuck out his hand and said “Bluiett” before they began.)

In 2002, Bluiett was diagnosed with prostate cancer. As part of his holistic treatment, he switched to a vegetarian diet, which he claimed changed his music after a lifelong devotion to the Blues. “Blues came out of pork and alcohol,” Bluiett told St. Louis magazine in 2011. “I can’t hang with the meat eaters all the way — I’m not saying it’s good or bad; it was just different.” 

After a series of strokes and seizures that began in January of this year, Bluiett was taken off respiratory support in October. — Jessica Bryce Young

ShearerWilliam ShearerIllustration: Greg Houston

William Shearer

Immunologist and physician to the so-called “Bubble Boy” // Aug. 23, 1937–Oct. 9, 2018

It was 1979 when Dr. William Shearer first met 7-year-old David Vetter, the Texas boy who was born without an immune system and lived in a series of NASA-designed plastic bubbles.  

Many years later, Shearer recalled that first meeting on his blog. “He immediately put his arms in the gloves extending from his plastic isolator system to shake my hand and began quizzing me to make sure I understood that he was special and was competent enough to care for him,” Shearer wrote.

Theirs would be a brief relationship; David died in 1984 at age 12 after an unsuccessful bone marrow transplant in an attempt to cure him of his severe combined immunodeficiency. Despite its brevity, the relationship would have a lasting legacy.

“He was like his father at the hospital, another dad,” David’s father told the New York Times. “They had a real strong rapport, and David loved him.”

Shearer died this October from complications from polymyositis, an inflammatory disease that causes muscle weakness. Born in Detroit in 1937, he earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from University of Detroit and a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Wayne State University, and graduated from the Washington University School of Medicine in 1970. He later served pediatrics and immunology residencies in St. Louis before moving to Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, where he treated David.

David’s was a lonely life. His older brother died from SCID, and his parents knew if they had another boy there was a 50-50 chance he could also have the hereditary disease. As soon as he was born, David was placed into his first plastic bubble. Any objects like toys had to be sterilized and placed through a series of air locks, and he could never touch another human.

Under Shearer’s care, the case of David — a handsome boy who loved Star Wars and the Texas Oilers — captivated audiences around the world, with Shearer serving as its face. While Shearer often remarked upon David’s resilience, observing David’s despair at living in isolation — he reportedly had recurring nightmares about his condition — caused him to debate the ethics of keeping the boy trapped in his plastic cage. At one point, he suggested removing David from the bubble and trying other treatment methods, but David’s parents pushed for keeping him in until a suitable bone marrow donor could be found.

In 1984, Shearer performed the long-awaited procedure. It didn’t work, and David soon became sick from a lymph node cancer caused by an undetected virus in the marrow. He lived his final 15 days outside of his bubble in a hospital room, where his mother kissed him for the first time.

Shearer appeared on television to announce David’s death, which he would later call one of the most difficult times of his life. But his story with David wasn’t over: With samples of David’s blood, Shearer determined that David died from an infection from the Epstein-Barr virus, and later identified a gene that causes immune deficiencies. His discoveries would help create a test for the condition in newborns. Thanks in part to Shearer’s research, children with immune diseases are now able to live without plastic bubbles, and today more than 90 percent can be successfully treated with bone marrow and stem cell transplants within their first 28 days of life.

After David’s death, Shearer founded the David Center at Texas Children’s, a wing focused on treatment of immune diseases named in honor of his former patient and friend. He later focused his research on HIV and AIDS, participating in studies that led to the treatment and prevention of HIV and AIDS in children.

“People often ask what’s the measure of someone’s life, but very few people stood as tall as David,” Dr. Shearer told the Houston Chronicle in 2009. “More than any scientist, he taught us by his life.” — Lee DeVito

DorcasDorcas ReillyIllustration: Greg Houston

Dorcas Reilly

Inventor of the green bean casserole // July 22, 1926–Oct. 15, 2018

She may not be a household name, but Dorcas Reilly is a household staple: Her iconic Campbell’s Soup green bean casserole is served in more than 20 million American homes each Thanksgiving and, the rest of the year, acts as a quintessential comfort dish that can be popped in and out of the oven in less than 30 minutes.

Reilly, a 1947 graduate of Drexel University’s Home Economics program, was one of the first two full-time employees at Campbell’s Camden, New Jersey, home economics department, working in the test kitchen to develop new recipes.

Originally invented in 1955 as a “green bean bake” for an Associated Press story asking for a vegetable side dish made with pantry staples, the casserole calls for just six ingredients: a can of Campbell’s condensed cream of mushroom soup, milk, soy sauce, black pepper, green beans and crispy French-fried onions. It was a wholesome home-cooked meal crafted in an Atomic Age that celebrated canned goods and convenience cooking, but its combination of creamy, crunchy and salty has stood the test of time.

Today, more than 60 years later, Campbell’s estimates upward of 40 percent of their condensed mushroom soup sales are used to make Reilly’s casserole — the recipe is even printed on the back of the can. Screen Shot20181218At5 26 42PM

“Dorcas would often share that the first time she made her famous recipe, it did not receive the highest rating in Campbell’s internal testing,” wrote the company in an October memorial for Reilly’s passing. “Yet, it was her persistence and creativity that led to an enduring recipe that will live on for decades to come.”

Reilly worked for the company off and on from the 1940s to the 1980s, when she retired as manager of the Campbell’s Kitchen in 1988. In addition to her lasting bean legacy, she also invented hundreds of other soup-infused recipes including a tuna noodle casserole, tomato soup cake and tomato soup sloppy Joes.

In 2002, Campbell’s donated Reilly’s original recipe card to the National Inventors Hall of Fame in Alexandria, Virginia, placing her patented legacy alongside the likes of Thomas Edison, the Wright Brothers and Steve Wozniak.

“I’m very proud of this,” she said of the recipe in a Campbell’s video, “and I was shocked when I realized how popular it had become.” — Maija Zummo 

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

New arts foundation launches

Founder Leslee Stradford and artist-in-residence Claude Lawrence pose in the June Howes Stradford Foundation studio, 5438 S. Ingleside Ave. (Photo by Aaron Gettinger)

By AARON GETTINGER
Staff Writer

The June Howes Stradford Foundation held its first public event on Sunday at 5438 S. Ingleside Ave., a townhouse remodeled to contain galleries, apartments and studio space for an artists’ residency program.

It is a tribute to its late namesake, an Englishwoman who immigrated to Hyde Park and had a long career as an interior designer at stores like Accent Design and Wall and Window.

“Most of her adult life she spent here,” said her daughter, artist and Foundation founder Leslee Stradford, who splits time between the neighborhood and the East Bay region of California. “Having been in the arts and following her lead, I decided that what I needed that what I needed to do was … to create an exhibition space that artists could use for residency — that there could be other artists who didn’t have the opportunity to work independently, and to be able to be away from their normal work environments.”

Residencies will last for one, three or six months; they can be sponsored either independently or by colleges or other organizations.

“We have artists, probably will be applying who are relatively new, sort of novices, who really want to experiment [and] find out what their style is, and I think there are other artists … who really haven’t had a chance to work on their own and have space and not worry about having funds for their expenses,” Stradford said, later adding that the residencies will be open to curators, dancers and writers, too.

“I think many African-American artists’ works, and people of color generally, have not been represented in most museums until just relatively recently,” she added. At present, the Foundation’s galleries are displaying works by AfriCOBRA collective artist Napoleon Jones-Henderson, native South Sider Richard Hunt and photographer Adger Cowans.

Artist and jazz musician Claude Lawrence is the Foundation’s first resident, working mostly on abstract, figurative work.

“I don’t do commissions,” he said. “I do what comes out of my head, my heart, whatever.” He called the residency program fantastic for its freedom and “opportunity to just to concentrate on your work, so the promise is fulfilled.”

Stradford’s long-term goals are to provide $1,000 stipends for the artists and to open another site in her mother’s ancestral Norwich, Norfolk, in the East of England. She hopes to be able to fund artists “who want an international experience” to go there. Fundraising has begun in earnest, though there is no endowment yet; Stradford said she hopes to be able to offer rentable space and collect corporate donations.

The Foundation’s galleries are open by appointment at jhs.artsfoundation@gmail.com.

a.gettinger@hpherald.com

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Man gets $1.1M for spending 17 years in prison for his doppelganger

(CNN) – Richard Anthony Jones spent 17 years in prison for a crime he says was committed by his doppelganger. Now, he will receive a $1.1 million settlement in a lawsuit that was resolved under a new mistaken-conviction law, Kansas officials announced Tuesday.

“We are committed to faithfully administering the new mistaken-conviction statute the legislature enacted,” Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said in a statement. “In this case, it was possible on the existing record to resolve all issues quickly, satisfy all of the statute’s requirements, and agree to this outcome so Mr. Jones can receive the benefits to which he is entitled by law because he was mistakenly convicted.”

Jones, who was released from prison last year, filed a petition in August asking the state to pay him $1.1 million and to officially proclaim his innocence.

This is the first lawsuit filed under the mistaken-conviction statute enacted by the legislature earlier this year, according to Schmidt.

Jones was convicted in the 1999 aggravated robbery of a woman in a Walmart parking lot. Jones had a solid alibi: He was at a birthday party where he was seen by several people. But he was blamed for the crime anyway because he looked almost exactly like the man who eventually became the suspect.

What happened

In 1999 a man tried to steal a woman’s purse outside a Walmart in Roeland Park, Kansas. The woman fought back and held onto the purse, but the man made off with her cellphone. Because the woman fell and scraped her knees, the phone theft was classified as an aggravated robbery.

Eyewitnesses identified the criminal as a “light-skinned Hispanic or African-American man” named Rick who had “long hair pulled back.”

A witness wrote down the license plate number of the car involved in the robbery. Investigators tracked down the driver of the car, who led them to the house where Rick lived.

Then the driver went to the precinct, where he looked through booking photos of people with the name Richard and Rick that matched the description the victim and a security guard had given.

The driver ID’d Jones as Rick. So did the victim, during a preliminary hearing and later at trial. But at the time of the robbery, Jones was at his girlfriend’s birthday party, where several guests testified they saw him, and he had spent the next day watching movies with the girlfriend and cleaning up after the party.

His alibi didn’t sway the jury, and Jones, who had a criminal record, was convicted on the aggravated robbery charge and sentenced to 19 years in prison.

Jones appealed and lost. Then he learned about the Midwest Innocence Project, which partners with the University of Kansas’ Project for Innocence.

Finding the doppelganger

The team from the Innocence Project eventually tracked down who they believe is the real “Rick:” He is Ricky Lee Amos, who looks strikingly similar to Jones and who had lived at the address linked to the crime.

This information was presented to the eyewitnesses, who — when shown the mugshots of the two men — could no longer definitely say that Jones was the robber. After that a judge tossed out Jones’ conviction and freed him from prison on June 8, 2017.

The statute of limitations on the crime has passed, so if there was a case against Amos, he cannot be prosecuted.

Seeking a fresh start

Along with the $1.1 million, the court ordered on Tuesday the following relief for Jones: a certificate of innocence, record of his arrest and conviction to be expunged, the destruction of any biological samples associated with his case, counseling and permission to participate in the state health care benefits program for plan years 2019 and 2020.

Alice Craig, the lead attorney with the Innocence Project who worked to free Jones, said at the time of his release that Jones had no ill will toward Amos.

“I don’t think so, because it’s not Ricky’s fault that this happened, but ultimately he was the one we believe who was responsible for the crime,” Craig said. “Ricky has never admitted to the crime and I think (Jones) … was somewhat disappointed that he didn’t admit to (it).”

The firing of Marc Lamont Hill raises this question

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RIP: Those who died in 2018

Kofi Anan (80). Ghana-born, United Nations secretary general from 1997 to 2006; he won the Nobel peace prize in 2001.

Avicii (28).
Swedish DJ and producer.
(Real name: Tim Bergling.)

Charles Aznavour (94). Armenian-born French singer and songwriter (he wrote more than 1 000 songs); Anglophones remember his 1974 hit She.

Marty Balin (76). American musician; key figure in Jefferson Airplane and later Jefferson Starship.

Trevor Bayliss (80). Inventor of the wind-up radio.

Bernardo Bertolucci (77). Italian director, famous for Last Tango in Paris and The Last Emperor.

Anthony Bourdan (61). Celebrity chef, writer and documentary-maker; his final series was Parts Unknown.

Barbara Bush (92). Wife of the 41st president of the United States.

George HW Bush (94). Forty-first president of the United States; he presided over the first Gulf War.

Fidel Ángel Castro Díaz-Balart (68). Fidel Castro’s son; he became a scientist.

Dennis Edwards (74). Singer in soul band The Temptations; he was on their hit Papa Was a Rolling Stone (1972).

Roy Clark (85). Country singer and actor on The Beverly Hillbillies.

Fenella Fielding, (90). British actor, called “England’s first lady of the double entendre”; Carry On Regardless (1961) was among her works.

Aretha Franklin (76). The Queen of Soul, she was the most powerful voice in 1960s and early-1970s music. Winner of 18 Grammies, her songs included Respect, Think and (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman.

Lewis Gilbert (97). British film director of Alfie (1966), Educating Rita (1983) and Shirley Valentine (1989), and three James Bond films, among many others.

Hubert de Givenchy (91). French fashion designer.

William Goldman (87). Novelist and Hollywood scriptwriter; won Oscars for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and All the President’s Men (1976) scripts. Wrote a famous memoir, Adventures in the Screen Trade (1983).

Billy Graham (99). American evangelist.

Roy Hargrove (49). Jazz trumpeter; leader of The RH Factor, winner of two Grammy awards.

Barbara Harris (83). Actor; starred in Nashville (1975) and Family Plot (1976).

Stephen Hawking (76). Scientist and populariser of science; wrote the worldwide bestseller A Brief History of Time (1988).

(Stephen Hawking)

Tab Hunter (86). US actor, a heartthrob in the 1950s and 1960s; by the 1980s he was gleefully parodying himself in Polyester (1981) and Lust in the Dust (1985).

Sridevi Kapoor (54). Bollywood star who made more than 300 movies.

Jamal Khashoggi (59). Saudi Arabian dissident journalist, resident in US; murdered in Saudi embassy in Istanbul.

Ed King (68). Lynyrd Skynyrd guitarist; wrote the hit Sweet Home Alabama.

Margot Kidder (69). Actor who played Lois Lane in several Superman movies.

Charles Krauthammer (68). US political punter and columnist.

Stan Lee (95). Creator and publisher of a host of comic-book characters and superheroes, he led Marvel Comics from 1941 to 2010.

John Mahoney (77). Actor; known for his role as the dad in long-running TV sitcom Frasier.

John McCain (81). US war hero, Republican senator who vied with Donald Trump for a presidential nomination in 2016.

Mac Miller (26). US rapper and producer.

Dolores O’Riordan (46). Cranberries singer.

Burt Reynolds (82). US actor and sex symbol; had a hit with Deliverance (1972) and another with Smokey and the Bandit (1977).

Philip Roth (85). US novelist and author of more than 30 books. His first big success was Portnoy’s Complaint (1969); he followed it with highly regarded works such as The Ghost Writer (1979), Sabbath’s Theatre (1995) and The Plot Against America (2004). He won all the prizes.

Nicolas Roeg (90). British film director, often avant garde; known for The Man Who Fell to Earth (1975).Pete Shelley (63). Lead singer of punk band the Buzzcocks.

Nancy Sinatra (101). Singer Frank Sinatra’s first wife; mother of his three children, including daughter Nancy.

Neil Simon (91). US playwritght and later screenwriter, famed for Barefoot in the Park” (1963) and Tony-winner The Odd Couple (1965).

Mark E Smith (60). Singer of post-punk band The Fall.

Verne Troyer (49). Actor, best known for playing Mini-Me in the Austin Powers movies.

Mort Walker (91). Cartoonist; his Hi and Lois strip ran for decades.

Nancy Wilson (81). Jazz and rhythm and blues singer; she had hits with Tell Me the Truth and (You Don’t Know) How Glad I Am in the early 1960s and her own TV show later in the decade.

Tom Wolfe (88). American writer who had non-fiction hits with works such as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (1968) and The Right Stuff (1979), and later with novels such as Bonfire of the Vanities (1987).


South Africans gone to the ancestors

HHP (38). Hip-hop star, proponent of motswako rap; his hits included Harambe, Tswaka and Bosso. (Birth name Jabulani Tsambo; the HHP once stood for Hip Hip Pantsula.)

Akhumzi Jezile (29). Youthful star on YoTVand actor in Tempy Pushas.

Keorapetse Kgositsile, widely known as Bra Willie (79). Writer, teacher and arts activist. South Africa’s poet laureate from 2006, he spent three decades in exile. In the United States, he published poetry, including Spirits Unchained (1969) and My Name Is Afrika (1971), performed his work as part of the Uptown Black Arts Movement, and co-founded the Black Arts Theatre in New York. He returned to South Africa in 1990; in the same year his collection When the Clouds Clear came out.

Winnie Mandela (81). Controversial icon of the struggle against apartheid. While her husband Nelson Mandela was in jail, from the early 1960s to 1990, she kept the flame burning, surviving arrests, banning and persecution. In the late 1980s she was involved with the thuggish “football club” that led to the death of child activist Stompie Seipei.

Hugh Masekela (78). Jazz trumpeter and composer. As a youth, he was part of the 1950s Sophiatown cultural boom; later he was a leading performer based in the United States till his return from exile in 1990. Grazing in the Grass (1968) was a US hit; Bring Him Back Home (1987) became an anthem about Nelson Mandela. His Stimela (1994) is almost another national anthem.

(Hugh Masekela) 

Chris Matshaba (39). Radio personality (Motsweding FM, North West FM) and businessman.

Sandy Mokwena (68). Veteran actor; known in his last years for his role as Bra Eddie in Scandal.

Mendi Msimang (89). Leading figure of the freedom struggle, though often behind the scenes. An ANC Youth League founder in the 1940s, he served the ANC in exile as an organiser, ambassador (India and later Britain) and co-founder of Solomon Mhlangu College; he served the ANC in power as treasurer general and later chair of its integrity commission.

David Phetoe (85). Well known actor, he played as Paul Moroka in long-running TV series Generations.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

David Harris Channels Nat King Cole in Time for the Holidays!

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NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA– At times it can be hard to tell the seasons here in New Orleans.  The weather’s mood swings can threaten any twinkling of holiday cheer.

As the Christmas lights shine brightly over the Vieux Carré and fires glow under the skillets of roux and seasoning, many holiday playlists are bringing in the season right.  Quite frankly, nothing says Christmas quite like Nat King Cole.

Right before Christmas David L. Harris will bring you the spirit of Nat King Cole.

David L. Harris is a multi-talented trombone player and vocalist who is a music ambassador, bringing New Orleans’ music across the globe when he is on tour.  His debut album entitled, “The Blues I felt,” made waves… or at least sound waves!

David is a Nat Cole aficionado and describes Nat’s voice as  “very angelic. It sounds so crisp, so clean, so intentional, so dignified. He has an ability to sing any song about anything and make everybody love it.”

The swinging David L. Harris, will channel the spirit of Nat for a special holiday concert at the Preservation Hall on December, 22nd.    It is a celebration, reflecting the essence of Nathaniel Adams Cole.

David says, the idea of performing a concert centered around Nat’s artistry was a no brainer.

“I started singing a song entitled, “When I Grow Too Old to Dream” and said to myself, who else sings this song? I came across Nat King Cole and then I hear his recording and explore the other songs that he did.  I check out his life and start to admire him and think that it is a good idea to honor him,” says David.

Indeed there is much to admire, when looking at Nat King Coles life.

Nat King Cole rarely ventured into the south after being assaulted on stage at a Birmingham concert in 1956.  He, like the many other black artists at that time, had talents that were admired, but a skin color that was not.  However, Nat did receive a little love from the southern city of New Orleans.

Regal beer in New Orleans, Louisiana,  was one of a few regional sponsors for the first network television program hosted by an African American.  The Nat King Cole show was cancelled after just one year, but it opened the door to television-hosting for blacks.

The show’s cancellation didn’t keep Nat down.  He continued to shine over the years.  In 1961 he recorded his definitive rendition of “the Christmas Song,” which survives as one of the most popular holiday songs in history.

David L. Harris says, while looking at a Nat video performance on YouTube, “I’ve never seen him make a frown, or anything like that. He just looks like this happy man anytime he sings. No matter how much stuff was going on at that time, which was a lot.  He dealt with so many things. Every time I see him perform, I find one exuberant emotion….joy.”

To catch a taste of Nat King Cole and experience the artistry of David L. Harris, you can go to Preservation Jazz Hall Saturday, December 22, at 12:30 pm.   The show’s title is: David L. Harris presents a Nat King Cole “Halliday.”

You can purchase tickets click HERE.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Local group produces the thought-provoking ‘Black Nativity: Liberation Holiday’

Black Nativity: Liberation Holiday is a dynamic new production that will spotlight artists and culture bearers in Asheville’s African-American community. Produced by Southside Rising and supported by partners such as Asheville Creative Arts, the show opens Saturday, Dec. 15, and will be staged throughout the city.

Divided into three parts, Black Nativity: Liberation Holiday looks at the trajectory of black lives. The first act is Roots/Birth. “That’s when we talk about the birth of Black Christ,” explains director Daniele Martin. “That’s when we talk about our roots as people, and there’s a birthing ritual. It’s about us coming into life.”

The second act is Liberation. “We may still be dealing with racism, but there is liberation in our lives all the time,” says Martin. And the third act, Celebration, she explains, is “celebration that we’re still here, that we’ve been able to endure.”

Martin continues, “I want to give a production that black people look forward to. I want to bring a joyful experience for black people around the holidays that’s not about Christmas.”

With its focus on black Asheville, four performances are being presented primarily for residents in historically black neighborhoods, with two for the greater community to be held at the Asheville Community Theatre and the YMI Cultural Center. Notably, the performance at the YMI will kick off that organization’s 125th-anniversary celebration. Proceeds from ticket sales will be used to support opportunities for black artists and performers.

While crafting a framework for Black Nativity: Liberation Holiday, Martin says, “I felt it was important to really talk about our culture, to show that despite a lot of things that I think Asheville has done dirty to black people, we are still here, we are still persevering, and there are still things in our lives to celebrate.”

“For us to use the arts as the anchor for us to come together with this particular play, this should be a catalyst for so much more to come,” says Michael Hayes, a member of the show’s creative team. “It should be a catalyst for us re-realizing. Not just our resilience — we know that part — but an opportunity to have our own spaces to showcase what we do and who we are.”

In addition to Hayes and Martin, who will both perform in the show, the creative team also includes Jonathan Santos, whose band Soulution is part of the production. Other performers are Olympia Garrett, Janeesha Renee, Kia Rice, Kasia Maatafale, DJ Twan and members of the Urban Arts Institute. Attendees can expect music, dance and poetry, as well as dramatic pieces.

Using community-based performers was an intentional decision for Martin, as was allowing their contributions to be organic rather than strictly adhering to Langston Hughes’ 1961 play, Black Nativity, the original inspiration for the show.

Southside Rising is a collaboration between organizations and people desiring to cultivate healing, restore and reclaim community culture, support emerging leaders, grow food and incubate economic development in the historically African-American Southside neighborhood. It is significant that rehearsals for Black Nativity: Liberation Holiday are being held in the heart of Southside at the Arthur R. Edington Education & Career Center — also the site of the first shows. The building has long been part of the legacy of black excellence in Asheville.

From 1942-70, the building was the Livingston Street School, offering black students education and enrichment. The city of Asheville took the property over in 1970, converting the school into the W.C. Reid Center for Cultural Arts. In 2012, it was purchased by the Housing Authority of the City of Asheville and, in 2014, was renamed the Arthur R. Edington Center after a former Livingston Street School principal. Today, the center holds numerous organizations, including Green Opportunities, My Community Matters and UpFront Sports Management.

Hayes, who is also a case manager for Green Opportunities, founder of the Urban Arts Institute dance troupe and a longtime resident of Asheville, remembers the days when the W.C. Reid Center was the space for countless cultural events for black residents, including talent shows he hosted in the ’80s for capacity crowds. He says this new production is reminiscent of those days because it’s taking “different parts of the black talent and black artistry that is part of the black Asheville artist movement and bringing it all together, which has not been done in so long.”

Hayes continues, “There have to be spaces that allow people of color to start healing from the generational trauma, from systemic racism.” He sees Black Nativity: Liberation Holiday as one of those healing spaces. “We are bringing people together … for an explosion of energy and creativity. It’s going to make people think about what liberation really means to them. That’s what I’m looking forward to.”

WHAT: Black Nativity: Liberation Holiday, tickets at southsiderising.com
WHERE/WHEN: Arthur R. Edington Center, 133 Livingston St., Saturday, Dec, 15. 2 and 7 p.m. By donation
WHERE/WHEN: Burton Street Center, 134 Burton St., Sunday, Dec. 16, 5 p.m. By donation
WHERE/WHEN: Stephens Lee Recreation Center, 30 George Washington Carver Ave., Tuesday, Dec. 18, 7 p.m. By donation
WHERE/WHEN: Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Friday, Dec. 21, 7:30 p.m. $5 youth/$15 general/$20 reserved
WHERE/WHEN: YMI Cultural Center, 39 S. Market St., Sunday, Dec. 23, 7:30 p.m. $5 youth/$15 general/$20 reserved

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment