Elvis’s jet fetches US$430K at auction — …

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — A private jet once owned by Elvis Presley has been auctioned after sitting on a runway in New Mexico for 35 years.

The plane sold for US$430,000 on Saturday at a California event featuring celebrity memorabilia, GWS Auctions Inc. said.

The buyer was not disclosed in the sold note posted on the firm’s website, and auctioneer Brigitte Kruse said she could not immediately release information about the buyer or the buyer’s plans for the plane.

The auction house says Elvis designed the interior that has gold-tone woodwork, red velvet seats and red shag carpet. But the red 1962 Lockheed Jetstar has no engine and needs a restoration of its cockpit.

The jet was owned by Elvis and his father, Vernon Presley, Liveauctioneers.com says.

It has been privately owned for 35 years and sitting on a tarmac in Roswell, N.M.

Photos of the plane show the exterior in need of restoration and seats of the cockpit torn.

A previous owner disputed the auction house’s claim the king of rock ‘n’ roll designed its red velvet interior.

Roy McKay told KOB-TV in Albuquerque he designed the interior himself. McKay said that when he purchased the jet, it had a two-toned grey interior and “kind of looked like a casket.”

But then-GWS spokesman Carl Carter told The Associated Press the auction house is confident Elvis designed the interior.

Federal Aviation Administration records show no interior changes were ever made to the jet, Carter said.

Presley was born in Tupelo on Jan. 8, 1935, and moved to Memphis with his parents at age 13. He became a leading figure in the fledgling rockabilly scene by covering songs originally performed by such African-American artists as Big Mama Thornton (“Hound Dog”) and Arthur Crudup (“That’s All Right”).

His provocative dancing and hit records turned him into one of the 20th century’s most recognizable icons. Historians say his music also helped usher in the fall of racial segregation.

Elvis was 42 when he died on Aug. 16, 1977, in Memphis.




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RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Black artists break Turner age barrier

Lubaina HimidImage copyright Edmund Blok
Image caption Lubaina Himid was made an MBE in 2010

A 62-year-old veteran of Britain’s black art scene, Lubaina Himid, is in the running for the Turner Prize after organisers scrapped its age limit.

British art’s most high-profile award has abolished its ban on over-50s this year – meaning Himid is eligible.

At 52, Hurvin Anderson, another key black British artist, is among the other nominees for the £25,000 prize.

The multicultural shortlist is completed by German-born Andrea Buttner and Londoner Rosalind Nashashibi.

The prize was the domain of Young British Artists in the 1990s – but the youngest person on the Turner shortlist this year is Nashashibi at 43.

The winner will be announced at the Ferens gallery in Hull on 5 December.

The Turner Prize was founded in 1984 and was open to all ages until 1991, when organisers limited it to artists under 50.

Image copyright Vanley Burke
Image caption Hurvin Anderson is nominated for exhibitions in Nottingham and Ontario

Analysis – BBC arts editor Will Gompertz

Lubaina Himid is likely to get the headlines, although probably not for her powerful, indignant images. It’ll be her age that causes a stir. This is the first year the age restriction of 50 years old or under has been removed from the qualifying conditions for the prize.

She is not the only seasoned artist on the list. In fact, all of those shortlisted are comfortably middle-aged.

It is also the most international feeling list for this national prize. Each of the four artists has strong links with cultures and counties beyond the UK, which reflects the globalised nature of the art world and the real world.

Frankly, age and origin matter not a bit. What’s important is whether or not they are any good, and do they – as the Turner Prize demands – represent developments in contemporary art? My answer would be firm “yes” to the former, and a more equivocal “not really” to the latter.

From a medium point of view, the list has a rather old-school feel about it, with two painters, a film-maker and a woodcutter – all of whom are making good work which I’m looking forward to seeing in what could be a memorable group show.

Find out more about the nominees:

Hurvin Anderson

Image copyright Hurvin Anderson

One of Britain’s leading contemporary painters, Anderson takes inspiration from his youth in Birmingham’s African-Caribbean community and visits to Trinidad. Barber shops feature regularly – they are places where he says both cultures meet.

He’s nominated for exhibitions in Nottingham and Ontario, Canada. The centrepiece of the Nottingham exhibition was a painting titled Is It Okay To Be Black? – a half-remembered view of a barber shop’s wall featuring Martin Luther King and Malcolm X.

The Tate judges described him as “an outstanding British painter whose art speaks to our current political moment with questions about identity and belonging”.

Andrea Buttner

Image copyright Brian Forrest

Buttner’s works have included a video of nuns who work in a funfair in Italy and woodcuts of faceless beggars.

She is interested in poverty, religion and shame. The judges said she highlights the “overlooked and undervalued”, and were impressed with the wide range of media used – including “unfashionable” formats like woodcuts and glass painting.

Her materials range from plywood – for woodcuts featuring simple, lonely figures – to fabric from workers’ uniforms and high-visibility jackets.

The jury also “noted Buttner’s unique approach to collaboration and her exploration of religion, morality and ethics”. The 45-year-old is based in London and Berlin, and is shortlisted for exhibitions in Switzerland and Los Angeles.

Lubaina Himid

Image copyright Stuart Whipps

Described by The Daily Telegraph as “the under-appreciated hero of black British art”, Himid made her name in the 1980s as one of the leaders of the British black arts movement – both painting and curating exhibitions of similarly overlooked black female artists.

The Zanzibar-born, Preston-based artist is now professor of contemporary art at the University of Central Lancashire and was made an MBE in 2010.

She’s nominated for solo shows in Bristol and Oxford. The Bristol show centred on larger-than-life cut-outs of 100 colourful figures – 17th Century African slave servants brought to Europe. Another work, Cotton.com, imagined conversations between the cotton workers of Lancashire and the slaves of South Carolina.

The Turner Prize judges praised her for “addressing pertinent questions of personal and political identity”.

Rosalind Nashashibi

Image copyright Rosalnind Nashashibi

Fourteen years after she won the £24,000 Beck’s Futures Prize, film artist and painter Nashashibi is nominated for the Turner.

Nashashibi was born in Croydon, south London, to Irish-Palestinian parents and studied at the Glasgow School of Art. She is nominated for an exhibition in California that included the film Electrical Gaza, which used live footage and animation to investigate everyday life in Gaza.

She’s also nominated for her contribution to the Documenta 14 exhibition in Athens, including a film about mother-and-daughter artists in self-imposed exile in Guatemala.

The jury said they were impressed by the “depth and maturity” of her work, which “often examines sites of human occupation and the coded relationships that occur within those spaces”.

The exhibition of work by this year’s shortlisted artists runs at the Ferens gallery in Hull – the UK’s City of Culture for 2017 – from 26 September to 7 January.

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RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Noose found at exhibit in African American Smithsonian museum

A University of Colorado police sergeant has been placed on administrative leave and is facing a felony charge of stalking a police dispatcher.

Sgt. Michael Dodson, 59, has not yet been arrested, according to court officials, but police have obtained a warrant charging him with one count of stalking, a Class 5 felony.

Dodson, who has been with the CU Police Department since 1996, has been placed on paid leave.

“As chief, I have a duty to ensure the actions of all our employees are within policy and meet the expectations of our values,” CU police Chief Ken Koch said in a statement Wednesday. “When there are allegations of wrongdoing, we need to investigate those fully and be accountable for the findings. I am very concerned about the alleged conduct because it does not reflect the strong reputation of our department nor the character of our employees.”

Calls to Dodson’s attorney were not immediately returned Wednesday.

TFC’s Justin Morrow: LeBron blazed path for all African Americans

… of the overt racism that a lot of African Americans deal with … openly and poignantly about racism and inequality in the … family well and he represented African Americans well. It’s unfortunate, … for athletes but all African Americans” Not that Morrow would … RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News

Forget awkward white boys, this is what a nerd looks like

The best gift my Mum gave me was boredom. I spent so much of my childhood bored. Every Sunday she, my brother and sister would nap, and I hated it. You close your eyes for a few hours and wake up groggier than when you first closed your eyes and you’ve wasted precious hours during your weekend.

While they napped I read. I read whatever I could get my hands on. We were pretty poor growing up so I didn’t have access to a lot of different books. Sometimes it was weird Tony Robbins motivational books, sometimes it was Babysitters Club, Goosebumps, crime books my grandmother had sent us after she was done with them or Harry Potter. Eventually in my later teens I developed a taste for Kurt Vonnegut and other science fiction.

My favourite film was Matilda. I loved her because she was nerdy and I loved her black best friend Lavender who was brave and smart.

There’s a scene in the film when Matilda’s teacher Ms Honey goes to Matilda’s house to talk to her parents. She wants to talk about Matilda’s genius, but is met with derision from Matilda’s Mum: “you chose books, I chose looks.” (Although I am clearly proof that you don’t have to choose one or the other). Matilda’s mother’s comments and the film in general made me feel like being smart was something like resistance, and something to be proud of.

Earlier this week my family moved all my stuff out of storage. My brother messaged me and told me he found my old dictionary. Mum bought me a really tiny used dictionary when I was young. I used to highlight words and keep a written collection of cool words that I would try and use in everyday conversation. I was clearly a nerd, but struggled fit in with the other nerdy kids where I was often the only one who was black.

The nerd in the cultural zeitgeist is a skinny white dude with glasses inside his parents basement. These are not the nerds I know now though. To me, the nerd is the black non-binary audio producer in their room taking apart their computer. The nerd is the black artist asking her friends if they want to play dungeons and dragons. The nerd is the black TV presenter posting cosplay selfies on her weekend. The nerd is a black playwright making us all laugh. The nerd is a black phd candidate correcting Stan Grant’s references to poetry on Twitter.

The world needs these nerds. I have no doubt that throughout the thousands of years black people have been here that we have had our fair share of nerds. Nerds who made discoveries about plants. Nerds who watched the stars.

The people who get shit done are the nerds. The people who notice the details. It is nerds who make discoveries. It is nerds who write the classics. The people who quietly obsess over things regardless of how “cool” the subject matter is.

In recent times it has become more socially acceptable to be a nerd. Particular shows and films have popularised the nerd: Scrubs‘ lead character JD, Freaks and Geeks and any character Michael Cera has played. These characters have always been depicted as awkward but ultimately endearing outsiders.

But these awkward white boys are far closer to the centre than the black nerd can access. For the black nerd, there is particular insight into being on the margins.

My other favourite film growing up was The Matrix. I thought Trinity was hot and I loved that there were authoritative figures who were black – Morpheus and The Oracle. I loved that I felt like there was something I could do about the shitty things in the world, that I was on the winning side, that there are ways to wake people up. The domination of the machines and the way in which humans are subjugated felt like a metaphor for assimilation.

This is not unique to The Matrix. Science fiction is whole genre of “what ifs”. It imagines the past, the future and different time constructs; and relies on themes such as invasion, exploration and discovery.

For the Indigenous viewer there is a particular irony in this. Much of science fiction is dominated by white people relying on the narratives of historical past wrongs inflicted by white people on black and brown bodies. In their iteration of these narratives though, white people are the victims of oppression and subsequently the heroes. They are the invaded – but in their version, they defeat their invader.

For Indigenous peoples, we have already seen the end of our worlds. We are living in a post-apocalyptic future where we are forced to look, sound, eat and live like our invaders. This reality, in my mind, is a missed opportunity in storytelling.

But there are exciting developments in black nerdery. The reception of shows like Cleverman and Luke Cage tell us that the world is ready for our stories. Black nerds are carving out their own space across different aspects of nerdery, which is exciting. We need to.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Noose Found on Floor of Exhibit at African American History Museum

Image
Photo: Monica Morgan/Wire Image; Alan Karchmer/NMAAHC

On Wednesday, visitors to the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., found a noose on the floor, according to Reuters.

Nooses are seen by many as a symbol of immense hatred and bigotry, having been directly linked to thousands of documented deaths throughout American history, most notably in the South. The noose was found by a tourist inside the “Era of Segregation 1786–1968” exhibit, which examines racial segregation throughout American history.

This is the second noose that’s been found on Smithsonian grounds just in the past week; the first was spotted hanging from a tree near the Hirshhorn Museum. The two incidents correlate with a rising number of bias incidents and hate crimes recorded by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Between the November election and February 2017, more than 1,300 hate incidents were reported. Recent racially motivated attacks include the fatal Portland train stabbings and the murder of Bowie State University Student, Richard Collins III.

Both Smithsonian incidents are being investigated by the U.S. Park Police. In a staffer email sent by Smithsonian Secretary David Skorton and obtained by BuzzFeed News, Skorton wrote that “the Smithsonian family stands together in condemning this act of hatred and intolerance, especially repugnant in a museum that affirms and celebrates the American values of inclusion and diversity.”

What to do with the noose left at the African American Museum? Make it part of the collection.

(Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

Leaving a noose in the segregation galleries of the National Museum of African American History and Culture is an example of what might be called asymmetrical symbolism.

With a small amount of effort, someone managed to send an extraordinary message of hatred with the rope when it was discovered inside the museum Wednesday. Like terrorism, asymmetrical symbolism can’t be fought with conventional means. It presents us with a paradox and few good options for response. To ignore it is to accept a world in which this kind of ugliness becomes normal and more frequent. But there is also the risk of unintentionally dignifying it. The good work, the message, the historical wisdom embodied in the galleries where the noose was left can’t be undone by such a small-minded and grotesque gesture.

One has to acknowledge the historical power of the object — a reference to lynching and, by extension, the use of racial terror to dehumanize and control African Americans — while also affirming the far larger and redemptive power of the institution that was vandalized. In a sense, it requires ordinary people to think like museum curators: to search out the meaning and history of an object while placing it in its proper context.

And so, perhaps there is an appropriate asymmetrical response to this asymmetrical act of hate: accession into the museum’s collection.

This isn’t likely to happen. Linda St. Thomas, a Smithsonian spokeswoman, points out that the noose (one of two found in or near a Smithsonian museum this week) is in the possession of the Park Police and instrumental to a criminal investigation. Incorporating it into the museum would also set unwanted precedents and give hatemongers unwanted power over determining the content of the museum’s collection.

And some would no doubt see incorporating it in the Smithsonian holdings as a kind of honor paid to the object itself. But this is a fundamental misunderstanding of what the Smithsonian does, a misunderstanding worth pondering for a moment.

The power of the galleries at the African American Museum focusing on racism and segregation is inseparable from the ugliness of the objects they contain. To their great credit, museum curators were fearless about incorporating repellent and even explosive reminders of racism into the collection, from racist figurines to a Ku Klux Klan robe. The presence of these objects is determined by their importance to the larger narrative of African American history, not by any wish to honor them through affiliation with the museum as an institution.

The museum deflates the symbolic power of the object without diminishing its historical importance. It is frozen in the current moment, detached from its original purpose and neutered as a living symbol of hatred. Yet it retains its power to shock the conscience.

The power of museums to do this — to neutralize without minimizing or denying a legacy of pain — is beyond extraordinary, especially in today’s new economy of visual inundation and social media environments that reward both the giving and taking of offense. A thoughtful museum that confronts history honestly is like the control rod inserted into a nuclear reaction, absorbing and nullifying rampant energies.

And that suggests another asymmetry. The perpetrator of the noose display likely imagined the act simply as a defacing of an institution associated with racial equality or harmony. But whoever did this brought the noose to one of the few institutions left in the country that can annihilate its power.

That doesn’t mean that the act isn’t connected to a long history of domestic terrorism, and it doesn’t mean we should mute our outrage. But it does allow us to acknowledge the puniness of the intent along with the power of the symbol. And it reinforces the power of the institution that was targeted.

Accessioning the noose would also affirm what the museum’s director, Lonnie Bunch, said in a statement: “Today’s incident is a painful reminder of the challenges that African Americans continue to face.” It is another historical artifact, like the ones already in the collection, and an artifact that clearly demolishes any argument that the racism is all in the past.

Rex Ellis, the museum’s associate director for curatorial affairs, doesn’t dismiss the idea of accessioning the object, though it could open “a Pandora’s box” of conflicting and unintentional messages. “It is an intriguing idea,” he says, but not a decision he would take without a long conversation with other curators and museum leaders.

That process — the conversation among curators, the parsing of symbolism and engagement with the museum’s purpose — would in itself deflate some of the object’s symbolic power. It would counter primitive hate with thoughtful engagement.

Would accessioning it give copycat symbolic terrorists power over determining not just the content of the collection, but the larger conversation? Perhaps not, if the museum made a clear statement that, as it has in the past and as it does with other artifacts, it collects strategically. It doesn’t accession every protest sign or every political button or every memento of the larger cultural contributions of the African American community.

Copycats needn’t bother with more nooses. The museum has what it needs, which is proof of an ongoing history of cultural violence, and that shameful object has already begun its permanent transmogrification into a museum piece.

As a black queer woman, I’m also proud to call myself a nerd

The best gift my Mum gave me was boredom. I spent so much of my childhood bored. Every Sunday she, my brother and sister would nap, and I hated it. You close your eyes for a few hours and wake up groggier than when you first closed your eyes and you’ve wasted precious hours during your weekend.

While they napped I read. I read whatever I could get my hands on. We were pretty poor growing up so I didn’t have access to a lot of different books. Sometimes it was weird Tony Robbins motivational books, sometimes it was Babysitters Club, Goosebumps, crime books my grandmother had sent us after she was done with them or Harry Potter. Eventually in my later teens I developed a taste for Kurt Vonnegut and other science fiction.

My favourite film was Matilda. I loved her because she was nerdy and I loved her black best friend Lavender who was brave and smart.

There’s a scene in the film when Matilda’s teacher Ms Honey goes to Matilda’s house to talk to her parents. She wants to talk about Matilda’s genius, but is met with derision from Matilda’s Mum: “you chose books, I chose looks.” (Although I am clearly proof that you don’t have to choose one or the other). Matilda’s mother’s comments and the film in general made me feel like being smart was something like resistance, and something to be proud of.

Earlier this week my family moved all my stuff out of storage. My brother messaged me and told me he found my old dictionary. Mum bought me a really tiny used dictionary when I was young. I used to highlight words and keep a written collection of cool words that I would try and use in everyday conversation. I was clearly a nerd, but struggled fit in with the other nerdy kids where I was often the only one who was black.

The nerd in the cultural zeitgeist is a skinny white dude with glasses inside his parents basement. These are not the nerds I know now though. To me, the nerd is the black non-binary audio producer in their room taking apart their computer. The nerd is the black artist asking her friends if they want to play dungeons and dragons. The nerd is the black TV presenter posting cosplay selfies on her weekend. The nerd is a black playwright making us all laugh. The nerd is a black phd candidate correcting Stan Grant’s references to poetry on Twitter.

The world needs these nerds. I have no doubt that throughout the thousands of years black people have been here that we have had our fair share of nerds. Nerds who made discoveries about plants. Nerds who watched the stars.

The people who get shit done are the nerds. The people who notice the details. It is nerds who make discoveries. It is nerds who write the classics. The people who quietly obsess over things regardless of how “cool” the subject matter is.

In recent times it has become more socially acceptable to be a nerd. Particular shows and films have popularised the nerd: Scrubs‘ lead character JD, Freaks and Geeks and any character Michael Cera has played. These characters have always been depicted as awkward but ultimately endearing outsiders.

But these awkward white boys are far closer to the centre than the black nerd can access. For the black nerd, there is particular insight into being on the margins.

My other favourite film growing up was The Matrix. I thought Trinity was hot and I loved that there were authoritative figures who were black – Morpheus and The Oracle. I loved that I felt like there was something I could do about the shitty things in the world, that I was on the winning side, that there are ways to wake people up. The domination of the machines and the way in which humans are subjugated felt like a metaphor for assimilation.

This is not unique to The Matrix. Science fiction is whole genre of “what ifs”. It imagines the past, the future and different time constructs; and relies on themes such as invasion, exploration and discovery.

For the Indigenous viewer there is a particular irony in this. Much of science fiction is dominated by white people relying on the narratives of historical past wrongs inflicted by white people on black and brown bodies. In their iteration of these narratives though, white people are the victims of oppression and subsequently the heroes. They are the invaded – but in their version, they defeat their invader.

For Indigenous peoples, we have already seen the end of our worlds. We are living in a post-apocalyptic future where we are forced to look, sound, eat and live like our invaders. This reality, in my mind, is a missed opportunity in storytelling.

But there are exciting developments in black nerdery. The reception of shows like Cleverman and Luke Cage tell us that the world is ready for our stories. Black nerds are carving out their own space across different aspects of nerdery, which is exciting. We need to.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment