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Noose found inside African American museum in DC

Samuel DuBois Cook, the first tenured African American professor at Duke, dies at age 88

News | University

President Richard Brodhead, in an email to the Duke community, wrote that Trustee Emeritus Samuel DuBois Cook had passed.

Cook—who served as a member of the Board of Trustees from 1981 to 1993—was the first African American professor to hold a regular faculty appointment at Duke. In his email, Brodhead noted Cook’s contributions to the University.

“I write to share the sad news of the death of Samuel DuBois Cook, a devoted member of the Duke community who had a special place in Duke’s history,” Brodhead wrote. “Dr. Cook joined the Duke faculty in 1966, becoming the first black faculty member at the newly integrated university and the first tenured black faculty member at any predominantly white institution in the historically segregated South. A scholar of political science who was intimately involved with the leadership of the Civil Rights Movement, he was the bearer of the vision of the beloved community and, throughout his life, worked for a society based on inclusion, reconciliation, and mutual respect for all.”

Cook—a Korean War veteran who received a bachelor’s degree from Morehouse College, and master’s and PhD degrees from the Ohio State University—previously taught at Southern University, Atlanta University, the University of Illinois and the University of California, Los Angeles prior to joining Duke’s faculty.

In 1974, Cook left Duke to become president of Dillard College, a position which he held until 1997.

Duke established the Samuel DuBois Cook Society in 1997 “to recognize, to celebrate, and to affirm the presence of African American students, faculty, and staff at Duke University.”

Brodhead also mentioned the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity—located in the Erwin Square Mill Building near Ninth Street—which “seeks to offer policy solutions addressing inequality and its effects,” according to its website.

According to Brodhead’s email, Cook’s funeral will be held June 6 at 11 a.m. at Morehouse College in Atlanta.

Editor’s Note: This article was updated at 2:20 p.m. to include details on Cook’s life. The headline was corrected at 3:15 p.m.—Cook was 88 when he died, not 89.

Noose Discovered in African American Museum of History in DC

A noose was discovered Wednesday on the grounds of an exhibit at the newly minted National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) in Washinton, DC. This marks the second time this week that a noose has been found within a Smithsonian museum property.

According to BuzzFeed News, a tourist came across the rope inside the Era of Segregation 1786-1968, one of the museum’s three history-based galleries.

“It was rather a small rope thing and not something that would set off the magnetometers,” Linda St. Thomas, a Smithsonian spokeswoman, shared with BuzzFeed News. “Park Police removed it and we reopened the gallery about an hour later.”

Read: City Employees In Portland Subjected To Hazing, Racism, Violence, Humiliation At Work: Report

Although Police had removed visitors from the section of the museum where the noose was found to investigate, the rest of the museum remained open to visitors, according to The Hill.

According to NBC 4 in Washington DC, Smithsonian Institution secretary David Skorton shared an email with Smithsonian staffers regarding the ongoing incidents.

“The Smithsonian family stands together in condemning this act of hatred and intolerance, especially repugnant in a museum that affirms and celebrates the American values of inclusion and diversity,” Skorton wrote. “We will not be intimated. Cowardly acts like these will not, for one moment, prevent us from the vital work we do.”

When it comes to unearthing nooses on its grounds, the Smithsonian Instutition isn’t alone. Recently, several schools including the likes of Duke University, American Univeristy, and University of Maryland at College Park have experience similar incidents. Yet, the Smithsonian Institute occurance doesn’t appear to be connected to the events that happened on the college campuses.

Earlier this week, Time notes that a noose was found Saturday, May 27 on the grounds of a different Smithsonian building — four days before Wednesday’s discovery. It was found hanging on a tree outside the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, which is located across the street from the NMAAHC. At this time, US Park Police are looking into both events, according to BuzzFeed News.

“We do consider this one to be different,” Bunch shared with BuzzFeed News regardin Wednesday’s incident. “In this case it’s clearly a message to the museum.”

Lonnie Bunch, the NMAAHC’s founding director, also shared their thoughts on the incident. Naturally, his words were published on the museum’s official Twitter account.

“The noose has long represented a deplorable acty of cowardice and depravity — a symbol of extreme violence for African Americans,” Bunch wrote. “This was a horrible act, but is a stark reminder of why our work is so important.”

Read: Paris Jackson Tweets Picture Of A Noose After Donald Trump Is Elected President

One can hope that these highly similar Smithsonian museum incidents aren’t a part of a larger, threatening pattern.

“We haven’t seen such mainstream support for hate in decades, not since the Civil Rights era 50 years ago,” Ryan Lenz, a Southern Poverty Law Center spokesperson, told Smithsonian.com. “We’re witnessing a moment when there are tremendous challenges to the country that we built on pluralism and democracy. The civil rights accorded every American are firmly under threat.”

Police are currently asking for anyone with information regarding these criminal acts to call the US Park Police immediately.   

African American Museum National Museum of African American History and Culture, pictured May 31, 2017, a noose was found Wednesday on museum grounds. Photo: Reuters

Noose Found Inside African American Museum in Washington

Photo

The National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington. Credit Lexey Swall for The New York Times

A noose was found Wednesday at an exhibition on segregation inside the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, the Smithsonian Institution announced.

Museum visitors found the noose on the floor in front of a display titled, “Democracy Abroad. Injustice at Home,” and it was reported to the United States Park Police. The permanent exhibition, “Defending Freedom, Defining Freedom: Era of Segregation 1876-1968,” was closed but reopened about three hours after the discovery, the Smithsonian said.

The noose found on Wednesday afternoon was the second one to have been discovered in the past week at the Smithsonian museum complex on the National Mall. On Saturday, the Park Police removed a noose from a tree outside the Hirshhorn Museum, which exhibits contemporary art.

The Smithsonian and the Park Police are working together on both cases. No arrests had been made as of Wednesday night.

“The Smithsonian family stands together in condemning this act of hatred and intolerance, especially repugnant in a museum that affirms and celebrates the American values of inclusion and diversity,” David J. Skorton, the secretary of the Smithsonian, wrote in an email to his staff.

Mr. Skorton called the episode “deeply disturbing” and added, “Cowardly acts like these will not, for one moment, prevent us from the vital work we do.”

Continue reading the main story

RIGHT NOW: WAVE 3 News, KY Center for African American Heritage partner for benefit for family of slain child

A stray bullet killed Dequante Hobbs and left his mother grieving in a much quieter house. (Source: Micheshia Norment)A stray bullet killed Dequante Hobbs and left his mother grieving in a much quieter house. (Source: Micheshia Norment)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) – WAVE 3 News is proud to partner with members of the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage for a benefit for the family of Dequante Hobbs Jr. Hobbs was the 7-year-old boy killed by a stray bullet while sitting at his kitchen table in west Louisville on May 21.

>> GOFUNDME: Help the Hobbs family by donating

The benefit for his family will take place Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the KY Center for African American Heritage, 1801 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd.

>> STORY: Shot fired next door kills boy, 7, eating snack at kitchen table

The event will be dine-in or carry-out with a $10 donation. The meal will include baked spaghetti, roast beef, vegetables, salad, bread and drinks. Desserts will be sold separately.

Sponsorship for the menu is provided by Donald’s Catering Service.

Live entertainment also will take place at the benefit, provided by Jonathon Johnson.

>> WATCH: ONLINE or ON THE WAVE 3 NEWS MOBILE APP

All proceeds will go to the family of Dequante Hobbs Jr.

A GoFundMe page has been set up to help the family cover funeral expenses. Click here to make a donation.

Volunteers are still needed to serve and assist with the event. Anyone interested in helping out with this event can call 502-650-2863.

Copyright 2017 WAVE 3 News. All rights reserved.

Noose found at the National Museum of African American History and Culture

FILE – President Barack Obama speaks during the dedication ceremony for the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

WASHINGTON (Sinclair Broadcast Group) – A noose was found Wednesday afternoon at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. according to the Smithsonian.

The noose was seen at an exhibition on segregation between 1786 and 1968 before being removed by Park Police. An investigation took place closing the exhibit for three hours. It is the second time this week that a noose was found in the area. Last Friday, a noose was seen hanging on a tree outside of Hirshhorn Museum after it had already been closed for the day.

In an email to staff members, director of the museum Lonnie Bunch called the incident “painful.”

“The noose has long represented a deplorable act of cowardice and depravity—a symbol of extreme violence for African Americans. Today’s incident is a painful reminder of the challenges that African Americans continue to face,” Bunch said.

David Skorton, the secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, also condemned these acts calling them cowardly in an email.

“The Smithsonian family stands together in condemning this act of hatred and intolerance, especially repugnant in a museum that affirms and celebrates the American values of inclusion and diversity.” Skorton said. “We will not be intimated. Cowardly acts like these will not, for one moment, prevent us from the vital work we do. We will remain vigilant and, in spite of these deplorable acts, we will become a stronger institution for all Americans.”

U.S. Park Police is still investigating the situation.

Elvis-owned jet auctioned for …

A private jet once owned by Elvis Presley has been auctioned after sitting on a runway in New Mexico for 35 years.

The plane sold for $430,000 (Dh1.58 million) on Saturday at a California event featuring celebrity memorabilia, GWS Auctions said.

The buyer was not disclosed in the sold note posted on the firm’s website, and auctioneer Brigitte Kruse said she could not immediately release information about the buyer or the buyer’s plans for the plane.

The auction house says Elvis designed the interior that has gold-tone woodwork, red velvet seats and red shag carpet.

But the red 1962 Lockheed Jetstar has no engine and needs a restoration of its cockpit.

The jet was owned by Elvis and his father, Vernon Presley, Liveauctioneers.com says. It has been privately owned for 35 years and sitting on a tarmac in Roswell, New Mexico. Photos of the plane show the exterior in need of restoration and seats of the cockpit torn.

A previous owner disputed the auction house’s claim the king of rock ‘n’ roll designed its red velvet interior. Roy McKay told KOB-TV in Albuquerque he designed the interior himself.

McKay said that when he purchased the jet, it had a two-toned gray interior and “kind of looked like a casket.”

But then-GWS spokesman Carl Carter told The Associated Press the auction house is confident Elvis designed the interior, which photos show has red velvet seats and red shag carpet.

Federal Aviation Administration records show no interior changes were ever made to the jet, Carter said. Presley was born in Tupelo on January 8, 1935, and moved to Memphis with his parents at age 13. He became a leading figure in the fledgling rockabilly scene by covering songs originally performed by African-American artists like Big Mama Thornton (Hound Dog) and Arthur Crudup (That’s All Right).

His provocative dancing and hit records turned him into one of the 20th century’s most recognisable icons. Historians say his music also helped usher in the fall of racial segregation.

Elvis was 42 when he died on August 16, 1977, in Memphis.

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