National Academy of Medicine Elects 85 New Members

Oct. 15, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

National Academy of Medicine Elects 85 New Members

WASHINGTON — The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) today announced the election of 75 regular members and 10 international members during its annual meeting.  Election to the Academy is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.

“This distinguished and diverse class of new members is a truly remarkable set of scholars and leaders whose impressive work has advanced science, improved health, and made the world a better place for everyone,” said National Academy of Medicine President Victor J. Dzau.  “Their expertise in science, medicine, health, and policy in the U.S. and around the globe will help our organization address today’s most pressing health challenges and inform the future of health and health care.  It is my privilege to welcome these esteemed individuals to the National Academy of Medicine.”

New members are elected by current members through a process that recognizes individuals who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health.  A diversity of talent among NAM’s membership is assured by its Articles of Organization, which stipulate that at least one-quarter of the membership is selected from fields outside the health professions — for example, from such fields as law, engineering, social sciences, and the humanities.  The newly elected members bring NAM’s total membership to 2,178 and the number of international members to 159.

Established originally as the Institute of Medicine in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine addresses critical issues in health, science, medicine, and related policy and inspires positive actions across sectors.  NAM works alongside the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions.  The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding.  With their election, NAM members make a commitment to volunteer their service in National Academies activities.

Newly elected regular members of the National Academy of Medicine are:

Yasmine Belkaid, Ph.D., director, microbiome program, and chief, metaorganism immunology section, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.  For defining fundamental mechanisms that regulate tissue immunity and uncovered key roles for the commensal microbiota and dietary factors in the maintenance of tissue immunity and protection to pathogens.

James M. Berger, Ph.D., professor of biophysics and biophysical chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore.  For groundbreaking discoveries about cell growth and genomic stability that impact human disease and therapeutic drug development.

Richard E. Besser, M.D., president and chief executive officer, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, N.J.  For leadership and achievement in public health preparedness and response, and for service as a gifted proponent of public understanding of complex health issues.

Richard S. Blumberg, M.D., Jerry S. Trier Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; and chief, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston.  For multiple seminal, paradigm-changing contributions to our understanding of mucosal immunology and immune development having identified mechanistic alterations central to several diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

Azad Bonni, M.D., Ph.D., Edison Professor of Neuroscience, and head, department of neuroscience, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis.  For discovering fundamental signaling networks governing brain development that have shed light on the development of cognitive disorders.

Andrea Califano, Dr., Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, departments of systems biology, biochemistry and molecular biophysics, and biomedical informatics, Institute of Cancer Genetics; chair, department of systems biology; director, JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center; and associate director, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York City.  For his pioneering work in systems biology and its implementation for the discovery of master regulator proteins and the networks they control in cancer cells.

Michael A. Caligiuri, M.D., president, Deana and Steve Campbell Physician-in-Chief Distinguished Chair, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, Calif.  For the discovery of the stages of human natural killer (NK) cell development, the role of IL-15 in NK survival, and in the pathogenesis of NK leukemia and cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

Clifton Watson Callaway, M.D., Ph.D., Ronald D. Stewart Endowed Chair in Research and professor of emergency medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh.  For achievements in basic and clinical research to reduce brain injury after resuscitation from cardiac arrest and improve patient outcomes.

Yang Chai, D.M.D., Ph.D., D.D.S., professor, George and Mary Lou Boone Chair in Craniofacial Biology, and associate dean of research, Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.  For pioneering studies on the molecular regulation of cell types during craniofacial development, leading to novel bioengineered treatment strategies and new hope to patients suffering from debilitating and emotionally devastating malformations of the head and face.

Giselle Corbie-Smith, M.D., M.Sc., Kenan Distinguished Professor, departments of social medicine and medicine, UNC Center for Health Equity Research, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  For her scholarly work on the practical and ethical issues of engaging communities in research to achieve health and equity. 

Peter Daszak, Ph.D., president and chief executive officer, EcoHealth Alliance, New York City.  For identifying the origin and drivers of emerging diseases and developing the map of disease hotspots using sophisticated ecological, socio-economic, and environmental methods.

Michael S. Diamond, M.D., Ph.D., Herbert S. Gasser Professor, departments of medicine, molecular microbiology, and pathology and immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis.  For research on the molecular basis and immune-mediated control of global infectious disease threats, including Zika, dengue, and chikungunya viruses, and defining critical viral determinants of the immune response that have facilitated the development of countermeasures to prevent their spread.

Susan M. Domchek, M.D., Basser Professor in Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.  For contributions in the evaluation and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer including the introduction of two BRCA1/2 specific drug therapies.

Francesca Dominici, Ph.D., Clarence James Gamble Professor of Biostatistics, Population, and Data Science, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and co-director, Harvard Data Science Initiative, Boston.  For developing and applying innovative statistical methods to understanding and reducing the impact of air pollution on population health. 

Benjamin Levine Ebert, M.D., Ph.D., chair of medical oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and George P. Canellos MD and Jean Y. Canellos Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston.  For contributions to understanding the genetics and biology of myeloid malignancies, to the characterization of clonal hematopoiesis, and to elucidating the mechanism of action of thalidomide and its analogs.

Jennifer Hartt Elisseeff, Ph.D., Morton Goldberg Professor, department of biomedical engineering and ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.  For significant achievements in regenerative medicine therapies and contributions to regenerative immunology.

Robert L. Ferrer, M.D., M.P.H., Dr. John M. Smith Jr. Professor and vice chair for research, department of family and community medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.  For his innovative application of a groundbreaking capability framework that provides a practical and positive method for addressing the social and environmental determinants of health in participatory interventions that integrate primary care and community health.

Robert M. Friedlander, M.D., M.A., chair, department of neurological surgery, and Walter E. Dandy Professor, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh.  For demonstrating the role of caspases in cell-death pathways in neurologic diseases, and for groundbreaking discoveries that have led to the development of novel therapies to improve outcomes for patients suffering from stroke, brain and spinal cord injury, Huntington’s disease, and ALS.

Ying-Hui Fu, Ph.D., professor, department of neurology, University of California, San Francisco.  For pioneering the identification of genes that have significant contribution to human circadian behaviors and genetic causes of altered sleep onset and duration, including familial advanced sleep phase and familial natural short sleep.

William A. Gahl, M.D., Ph.D., senior investigator, Medical Genetics Branch, and clinical director, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.  For contributions that include creating the Undiagnosed Diseases Program within intramural NIH to meld individualized patient care with next-generation sequencing and to provide insights into new mechanisms of disease; spearheading expansion to the national Undiagnosed Diseases Network and the Undiagnosed Disease Network International; and championing the sharing of genetic databases and best practices.

Joshua A. Gordon, M.D., Ph.D., director, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.  For research demonstrating how distant brain regions cooperate and coordinate their activity in order to guide behavior, and how this coordination is disrupted in experimental systems relevant to psychiatric disorders.

Scott Gottlieb, M.D., commissioner, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Md.  For influencing a wide range of public health issues, including key contributions on biomedical innovation policy, tobacco policy, and consumer protection and education.

David Allen Hafler, M.D., M.Sc., William S. and Lois Stiles Edgerly Professor of Neurology and Professor of Immunobiology, and chair, department of neurology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.  For seminal discoveries defining the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), including identification of autoreactive T cells and mechanisms that underlie their dysregulation, and the discovery of susceptibility genes that lead to MS.

Evelynn Maxine Hammonds, Ph.D., Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science, professor of African and African-American studies, and chair, department of history of science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  For being one of the nation’s most influential historians investigating the relationship of race, science, and medicine, and her work in clarifying the use of the concept of race as it relates to important health disparities.

David Newcomb Herndon, M.D., FACS, Jesse H. Jones Distinguished Chair in Burn Surgery, professor, department of pediatrics, and director, Institute for Translational Sciences, University of Texas Medical Branch; and director of research, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, Texas.  For numerous contributions as a leading surgeon-scientist that have improved our understanding of the metabolic effects of burn injury and changed how burned patients are treated.

Steven M. Holland, M.D., NIH Distinguished Investigator, director, Division of Intramural Research, and chief, immunopathogenesis section, Laboratory of Clinical Immunology and Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.  For distinguished achievements in primary immunodeficiencies and infectious diseases, including the recognition, treatment, genomic identification, and cure of previously unexplained diseases as well as the identification and characterization of novel pathogens in those diseases.

Amy Houtrow, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., associate professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation and pediatrics, department of physical medicine and rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh.  For research evaluating disability trends in childhood and the interactions among families, the health system, and social factors, which has uncovered disparities with enormous policy implications for the pediatric population.

Jeffrey Alan Hubbell, Ph.D., Eugene Bell Professor in Tissue Engineering, Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago.  For pioneering the development of cell responsive (bioactive) materials and inventing biomaterials that are now widely utilized in regenerative medicine.

John P.A. Ioannidis, M.D., D.Sc., C.F. Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention, professor of medicine, health research and policy, biomedical data science, and statistics, and co-director, Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.  For his dedication to rigorous, reproducible, and transparent health science, for his seminal work on meta-research, for his calls for quality in evidence, and for the positive impact it has had on the reliability and utility of scientific information throughout the sciences.

Robert E. Kingston, Ph.D., chief, department of molecular biology, Massachusetts General Hospital; and professor of genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston.  For contributions to understanding the role of nucleosomes in transcriptional regulations.

Ophir David Klein, M.D., Ph.D., Hillblom Distinguished Professor in Craniofacial Anomalies, Epstein Professor of Human Genetics, and professor of orofacial sciences and pediatrics, Schools of Dentistry and Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.  For his international reputation in developmental and stem cell biology, focusing on craniofacial, tooth, and bone development and regeneration, destined to lead to the biologically inspired restoration of teeth and other organs.

Alexander H. Krist, M.D., M.P.H., FAAFP, professor, department of family medicine and population health, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.  For pioneering the discovery of active patient engagement informatics solutions, including the invention of MyPreventiveCare, expertise at translating evidence into practice and policy, and serving as a trusted adviser on several national committees and task forces.

John Kuriyan, Ph.D., professor, departments of molecular and cell biology and chemistry, University of California, Berkeley.  For pioneering contributions to understanding the regulation of eukaryotic cell signaling by proteins such as Src-family kinases, and for determining the structural and molecular origin of the specificity of the first precision medicine, the cancer drug Gleevec.

Ellen Leibenluft, M.D., senior investigator, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.  For highlighting the need to carefully evaluate children who may have bipolar disorder; identifying chronic irritability, a new clinical problem which differs from pediatric bipolar disorder; and pioneering the use of cognitive neuroscience to address fundamental clinical questions on nosology and treatment of pediatric mental disorders.

Linda M. Liau, M.D., Ph.D, M.B.A., W. Eugene Stern Professor and chair, department of neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles.  For achievements in understanding the immunology of malignant brain tumors and designing clinical trials of dendritic cell-based vaccines for glioblastoma.

Keith Douglas Lillemoe, M.D., chief of surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital; and W. Gerald Austen Professor, Harvard Medical School, Boston.  For his work as a surgical leader and educator who has enhanced patient care, surgical quality, and safety.

Xihong Lin, Ph.D., chair and Henry Pickering Walcott Professor of Biostatistics, professor of statistics, and coordinating director, Program in Quantitative Genomics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston.  For contributions to statistics, genetics, epidemiology, and environmental health through influential and ingenious research in statistical methods and applications in whole-genome sequencing association studies, gene-environment, integrative analysis, and complex observational studies.

Catherine Reinis Lucey, M.D., professor of medicine, School of Medicine, executive vice dean and vice dean for education, and the Faustino and Martha Molina Bernadett Presidential Chair in Medical Education, University of California, San Francisco.  For her leadership in reforming medical education to combine the biological and social sciences, humanism, and professionalism to meet the needs of patients in the 21st century.

Ellen J. MacKenzie, Ph.D., M.Sc., Bloomberg Distinguished Professor and dean, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore.  For defining the field of trauma services and outcomes research and being recognized as one of the foremost experts in the area.

Martin A. Makary, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.S., professor of surgery and health policy and management, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore.  For creating the surgery checklist, leading pioneer studies on frailty, minimally invasive surgery, and procedure-specific opioid guidelines, creating metrics of high-value care, and leading national efforts on health care costs that addressed pricing failures, surprise billing, drug price transparency, and vulnerable populations.

Bradley A. Malin, Ph.D., F.A.C.M.I., professor and vice chair, biomedical informatics, and professor of biostatistics and computer science, Vanderbilt  University, Nashville, Tenn.  For contributions in natural language de-identification, guiding both national and international policies around research protection and enabling broad sharing and reuse of health and social data at an unprecedented scale.

George Mashour, M.D., Ph.D., associate dean for clinical and translational research, Bert N. La Du Professor of Anesthesiology, and director, Center for Consciousness Science and Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  For research informing current clinical practice in monitoring general anesthesia and leading to the identification of a common neural correlate of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness across diverse drug classes.

Ann Carolyn McKee, M.D., professor of neurology and pathology, Boston University School of Medicine; and director of neuropathology, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston.  For her groundbreaking work on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Alzheimer’s disease, aging, and vascular neuropathology that has revolutionized medicine’s understanding of the clinicopathological and molecular features of CTE in athletes and veterans exposed to neurotrauma or blast injury and changed the public dialogue on sports-related risk.

Barbara J. Meyer, Ph.D., investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and professor of genetics, genomics, and development, department of molecular and cell biology, University of California, Berkeley.  For groundbreaking work on chromosome dynamics that impact gene expression, development, and heredity using the nematode as a model organism.

Matthew Langer Meyerson, M.D., Ph.D., professor of pathology, Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston.  For discovery of EGFR mutations in lung cancer and their ability to predict responsiveness to EGFR inhibitors, thereby helping to establish the current paradigm of precision cancer therapy.

Terrie E. Moffitt, Ph.D., Nannerl O. Keohane University Professor, department of psychology and neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, N.C.  For path-breaking contributions to our understanding of human development, including her seminal theory of the development of antisocial behavior, which has had wide-ranging influence on clinical diagnosis of childhood conduct disorders, the early-years intervention movement, and two Supreme Court decisions.

Sean J. Morrison, Ph.D., professor and Kathryne and Gene Bishop Distinguished Chair in Pediatric Research, Children’s Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas.  For his accomplishments in distinguishing self-renewing blood-forming stem cells from multipotent progenitors in bone marrow, discovering in the central and peripheral nervous systems a series of key self-renewal mechanisms that regulate stem cell self-renewal and stem cell aging, identifying the unique metabolic requirements for blood stem cells, identifying the hematopoietic stem cell niche, and also serving as President of the International Society for Stem Cell Research.

Charles Alexander Nelson III, Ph.D., Richard David Scott Professor of Pediatric Developmental Medicine Research, Boston Children’s Hospital; and professor of pediatrics, neuroscience, and education, Harvard Medical School and Graduate School of Education, Boston.  For pioneering research on brain development in majority world settings and revealing the powerfully detrimental effects of adversity exposure on brain development in early life.

Kunle Odunsi, M.D., Ph.D., FRCOG, FACOG, deputy director, M. Steven Piver Professor of Gynecologic Oncology, chair, department of gynecologic oncology, and executive director, Center for Immunotherapy, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, N.Y.  For identifying key mechanisms of immune suppression within the ovarian tumor microenvironment, pioneering studies to re-engineer mature T cells and hematopoietic stem cells for adoptive T cell therapy, and implementing multi-institutional immunotherapy trials using novel strategies that he developed, to impact outcome and quality of life of ovarian cancer patients.

Lucila Ohno-Machado, M.D., Ph.D., professor of medicine, associate dean for informatics and technology, and chair, department of biomedical informatics, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego.  For creating an algorithm that allows sharing access to clinical data while respecting the privacy of individuals and institutions.

Jordan Scott Orange, M.D., Ph.D., chair of pediatrics, Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University; and pediatrician-in-chief, New York-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, New York City.  For his research achievements in defining a new class of immune diseases, natural killer cell deficiencies, as well as other genetic immunodeficiencies.

Lori J. Pierce, M.D., professor, department of radiation oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, and vice provost for academic and faculty affairs, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  For research in developing radiation treatments for breast cancer that leverage advances in medical physics and laboratory science and for national efforts to draw women and people of color into medicine.

Daniel E. Polsky, Ph.D., executive director, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Robert D. Eilers Professor of Health Care Management, and professor of medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.  For his contributions to advancing methods of economic evaluation of health care services and his research examining the functioning of physician labor markets.

Josiah “Jody” Rich, M.D., M.P.H., professor of medicine and epidemiology, Brown University; and director, Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, R.I.  For dedication in his medical and public health research career to improving the health and well-being of people in detention and incarceration, to substance users, and to health and well-being post release in communities in need.

Gene Ezia Robinson, Ph.D., Maybelle Leland Swanlund Endowed Chair, professor of entomology, and director, Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana.  For pioneering contributions to understanding the roles of genes in social behavior.

Hector P. Rodriguez, Ph.D., Henry J. Kaiser Endowed Chair and professor of organized health systems, School of Public Health, Health Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley.  For integrating organization science theories and methods to assess the impact of health care teams and primary care re-organization on patient engagement, patient experience of care, and outcomes particularly for vulnerable populations.

Charles N. Rotimi, Ph.D., chief and senior investigator, Metabolic, Cardiovascular, and Inflammatory Disease Genomics Branch, and director, Center for Research on Genomics and Global Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.  For groundbreaking research in African and African ancestry populations, providing new insights into the genetic and environmental contributors to a variety of important clinical conditions, as well as health disparities locally and globally.

Ralph Lewis Sacco, M.D., M.S., FAAN, FAHA, Olemberg Family Professor, chairman of neurology, and senior associate dean for clinical and translational science, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami.  For his instrumental involvement in policies promoting ideal cardiovascular health, brain health, stroke prevention, and non-communicable disease targets.

Judith A. Salerno, M.D., M.S., president, New York Academy of Medicine, New York City.  For her innovative contributions addressing health needs of the underserved and vulnerable, including improved palliative care for veterans, creative programs to combat childhood obesity, and breakthrough initiatives to reduce racial disparities in breast cancer.

Nanette Frances Santoro, M.D., professor and E. Stewart Taylor Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver.  For research discoveries in health predictors of midlife women, participation in cutting-edge clinical trial design and execution.

Stuart L. Schreiber, Ph.D., Morris Loeb Professor, department of chemistry and chemical biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  For advancing chemical biology and medicine through the discovery of small-molecule probes for signal transduction and gene regulation pathways.

Arlene Sharpe, Ph.D., M.D., co-chair and George Fabyan Professor of Comparative Pathology, department of microbiology and immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston.  For leadership in functional analysis of co-stimulatory and inhibitory pathways regulating T cell activation.

Marie Celeste Simon, Ph.D., scientific director and investigator, Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, associate director-shared resources, Abramson Cancer Center, and Arthur H. Rubenstein MBBCh Professor, department of cell and developmental biology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.  For pioneering research that revealed how oxygen gradients are essential for embryonic development, influencing stem cell behavior, angiogenesis, placentation, and hematopoiesis.

Albert L. Siu, M.D., M.S.P.H., professor, department of geriatrics and palliative medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City.  For seminal contributions to evidence-based practice in health-services research and in pioneering programs that intersect geriatrics and palliative care.

Claire Sterk, Ph.D., Charles Howard Candler Professor in Public Health and president, Emory University, Atlanta.  For significant public health achievements, specifically in the area of health disparities, and for leadership contributions to higher education both nationally and globally. 

Susan Stone, DNSc, CNM, FACNM, FAAN, president, Frontier Nursing University; and president, American College of Nurse-Midwives, Hyden, Ky.  For achievements that have opened the door to more than 5,000 nurses to achieve graduate education and positively impact the accessibility of quality health care for rural families across the United States.

Sylvia Trent-Adams, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, rear admiral and deputy surgeon general, Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C.  For leading the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services efforts; working with counterparts at the WHO, the U.S. Army, and other governments to build systems of care and strengthen human resources for underserved populations; and contributing to scientific and policy advances to improve health of persons living with HIV/AIDS.

Kara Odom Walker, M.D., M.P.H, M.S.H.S., cabinet secretary, Delaware Department of Health and Human Services, New Castle.  For her career spanning roles as a family physician and community health leader in academic medicine, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and state government who has championed health equity and consumer and community engagement.

Peter Walter, Ph.D., investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and distinguished professor, department of biochemistry and biophysics, University of California, San Francisco.  For elucidation of the unfolded protein response of the endoplasmic reticulum.

Xiaobin Wang, M.D., M.P.H., Sc.D., Zanvyl Krieger Professor and director, Center on Early Life Origins of Disease, department of population, family, and reproductive health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and professor of pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Children’s Center, Baltimore.  For contributions leading to the better understanding of fetal-perinatal genetic and environmental precursors of pediatric and chronic diseases, including preterm birth, obesity, asthma, and hypertension.

Ronald John Weigel, M.D., Ph.D., departmental executive officer and chair, department of surgery, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City.  For identifying key drivers of hormone response in breast cancer and pioneering the technique of expression analysis from archival breast cancer specimens, heralding the era of molecular diagnostics.

Rachel M. Werner, M.D., Ph.D., professor of medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.  For advancing our understanding of how health care provider performance measurement and incentives often bring unintended and undesired equity consequences that compete with efficiency goals.

Janey L. Wiggs, M.D., Ph.D., Paul Austin Chandler Professor of Ophthalmology, vice chair for clinical research in ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School; associate chief, ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear; and associate member, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Boston.  For research and achievements in the field of ocular genetics, including the discovery of multiple genetic and environmental risk factors for glaucoma, and for developing and implementing genetic testing for inherited eye disease.

Teresa Woodruff, Ph.D., Thomas J. Watkins Professor, and vice chair for research and chief, Division of Reproductive Science, department of obstetrics and gynecology, Northwestern University, Chicago.  For innovation in reproductive health, having cloned key regulators of ovarian and gonadotroph function; pioneering in vitro maturation of human oocytes; discovering roles for zinc in fertilization; and inventing microfluidic systems modeling human ovarian function, all relevant to her work on preservation of fertility in cancer patients, the field she named “oncofertility.”

King-Wai Yau, Ph.D., professor of neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore.  For pioneering research of the function of the retina that has led to our molecular and cellular understanding of circadian rhythms and several forms of hereditary blindness

Newly elected international members are:

Hanan Mohamed S. Al-Kuwari, Ph.D., minister of public health, State of Qatar; and managing director, Hamad Medical Corp., Doha, Qatar.  For leadership of Qatar’s largest care delivery system (Hamad Medical Corporation) at 33 years of age, and serving as Qatar’s Minister of Public Health.

Bruce Aylward, M.D., senior adviser to the director-general, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.  For his global public health leadership and innovation, and spearheading the global polio eradication initiative for 15 years and WHO humanitarian and epidemiological responses to outbreaks such as Ebola in West Africa.

Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, Ph.D., (retired), honorary president, department of virology and International Network, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.  For her discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the cause of AIDS for which she was the co-recipient of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Linamara Rizzo Battistella, M.D., Ph.D., São Paulo State Secretary for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and faculty of medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.  For developing the largest rehabilitation network in Brazil, offering clinical services to 100,000 adults and children with disabilities per month.

Zulfiqar A. Bhutta, M.B., B.S., Ph.D. FCPS, FRCP, FRCPCH, FAAP, Robert Harding Chair in Global Child Health and Policy, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada; and founding director, Center of Excellence in Women and Child Health, The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan.  For his synthesis of knowledge on effective child health interventions, implementation research in marginalized populations, and strategic advocacy for improving child health and development. 

Elias Campo, M.D., Ph.D., research director and professor of anatomic pathology, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, University of Barcelona; and director, Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain.  For his groundbreaking discoveries regarding the molecular pathogenesis of many B-cell neoplasms including chronic lymphocytic leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and plasmablastic lymphoma.

Joy Elizabeth Lawn, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., F.R.C.P. (Paeds), Ph.D., FMedSci, professor and chair of maternal reproductive and child health epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.  For her international leadership role in newborn health and stillbirths, both for epidemiological burden estimates and for the programmatic and clinical evidence base to address the burdens, notably in Africa.

Gabriel Matthew Leung, M.D., Zimmern Professor of Population Health and dean of medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.  For leadership in global health and medical education, and for contributions to infectious disease epidemiology and control.

Beverley Anne Orser, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.P.C., professor of physiology and chair, department of anesthesia, University of Toronto; and staff anesthesiologist, department of anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Toronto, Canada.  For her discovery of the unique pharmacological properties of extrasynaptic GABA-A receptors and their mechanistic role in anesthetic- and inflammation-induced impairment of memory, and for her leadership in academic anesthesiology.

Carol Propper, Ph.D., professor, Imperial College Business School, London, United Kingdom.  For fundamental contributions to the understanding of health reform, health care markets, health systems, international comparisons, environmental impacts on health, inequality and health, and mental health, and for real-world impacts via policy formation.

The National Academy of Medicine, established in 1970 as the Institute of Medicine, is an independent organization of eminent professionals from diverse fields including health and medicine; the natural, social, and behavioral sciences; and beyond.  It serves alongside the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering as an adviser to the nation and the international community.  Through its domestic and global initiatives, the NAM works to address critical issues in health, medicine, and related policy and inspire positive action across sectors.  The NAM collaborates closely with its peer academies and other divisions within the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

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Trump painting: Dogs playing poker or Kennedy with a combover?

Updated October 16, 2018 16:57:21

Many people may not realise that the White House is a museum, as well as the home of the American president and a place of government business.

Its rooms and hallways contain a heralded collection of furniture, china, statues, and most of all, paintings, both works of art, and depictions of history.

Every president and first lady is commemorated with a portrait, commissioned toward the end of their time in the White House, and hung a few years after they leave.

But Donald Trump, it seems, is not waiting to make sure his face hangs in the White House.

This weekend, the nation learnt through an interview on 60 Minutes that he is already on the wall of his private office.

Mr Trump appears in a fanciful grouping, enjoying cocktails with former presidents from the Republican party. (A teetotaller, his glass contains his favoured Diet Coke.)

The painting, called The Republican Club, is by artist Andy Thomas. He told NBC News that he was shocked to see it hanging in the White House.

Reagan, Nixon, Eisenhower, Lincoln … Trump?

I was pretty gobsmacked, too, given what I know about the building’s carefully curated decor.

The group includes Ronald Reagan, and both presidents Bush. Gerald R. Ford looks over Mr Trump’s shoulder, while Richard M. Nixon sits nearby.

Theodore Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and last but not least, Abraham Lincoln, all smile admiringly as Mr Trump beams.

It’s an image that you’d think was a joke, the presidential equivalent of those paintings on black velvet of dogs playing poker. Here in the States, we sometimes call that “art sold by the side of the road”, since vendors set up in tents next to petrol stations or highway exits.

In fact, the grouping is part of a series, according to Mr Thomas, who has painted Republican as well as Democratic presidents playing poker and pool.

And, it’s a copy, since Mr Thomas owns the original.

As Mr Thomas explained to NBC, the print was a gift to Mr Trump from Darrell Issa, a California Republican congressman. Mr Thomas said Mr Trump called to thank him after he received it.

Trump didn’t look this good in the ’90s

And no wonder he’d be pleased.

For one thing, his portrayal is artfully flattering. I met Mr Trump in his youthful prime in the 1990s, and he didn’t look this good back then.

Nor were his television producers able to bring off such glowing good health during his years on The Apprentice, no matter how many filters or camera angles they tried.

On Twitter, the joke was that he’d been painted to look like “a Kennedy with a combover”, and clearly, he has a vision in his head of looking something like this. Think of all the times he’s said that news organizations take terrible photographs of him.

And, Mr Trump isn’t the only dignitary who prefers to see himself painted at his best. There’s a legendary story about Winston Churchill’s displeasure with a portrait by Graham Sutherland, meant to be a tribute from the British Houses of Parliament on his 80th birthday.

The Netflix series The Crown shows Churchill’s rage at the too-accurate painting, although it fudges the circumstances under which it was banished from view.

It was actually Churchill’s wife, Clementine, who ordered it destroyed after his death because her husband disliked it. (A study for it still is in the possession of the National Portrait Gallery.)

White House reflects president who lives there

Since the president gets to choose both the artist and the scene for his official portrait, it’s likely sometime in the 2020s that Mr Trump’s likeness will be at least as flattering as what Mr Thomas has already painted.

Moreover, it’s likely to stand out from the other official portraits, and the other artwork in the White House offices and hallways, just as Mr Trump’s protocol-smashing tenure has been a vivid contrast to the behaviour of other presidents.

I can’t help but think, however, about the famed artists whose work has been displayed in the White House.

They include Gilbert Stuart, famed for his full-length depiction of George Washington and Dolley Payne Madison, the wife of James Madison.

One of my favourites is John Singer Sargent’s portrait of Theodore Roosevelt, which makes the famous Rough Rider look as if he is about to bolt off the canvas.

Among the 45 pictures chosen by the Obamas for the White House were paintings by Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper and Georgia O’Keefe, as well as African-American artists such as Jacob Lawrence and William H. Johnson.

In every way, a White House reflects the president who lives there. And its current occupant apparently enjoys seeing himself on a wall, having a Diet Coke with his predecessors.

At least we won’t be surprised once his official portrait is unveiled.

Micheline Maynard is a journalist and author.

Topics: donald-trump, politics-and-government, government-and-politics, world-politics, united-states

First posted October 16, 2018 16:37:01

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Trump’s head-scratching portrait

Updated October 16, 2018 16:57:21

Many people may not realise that the White House is a museum, as well as the home of the American president and a place of government business.

Its rooms and hallways contain a heralded collection of furniture, china, statues, and most of all, paintings, both works of art, and depictions of history.

Every president and first lady is commemorated with a portrait, commissioned toward the end of their time in the White House, and hung a few years after they leave.

But Donald Trump, it seems, is not waiting to make sure his face hangs in the White House.

This weekend, the nation learnt through an interview on 60 Minutes that he is already on the wall of his private office.

Mr Trump appears in a fanciful grouping, enjoying cocktails with former presidents from the Republican party. (A teetotaller, his glass contains his favoured Diet Coke.)

The painting, called The Republican Club, is by artist Andy Thomas. He told NBC News that he was shocked to see it hanging in the White House.

Reagan, Nixon, Eisenhower, Lincoln … Trump?

I was pretty gobsmacked, too, given what I know about the building’s carefully curated decor.

The group includes Ronald Reagan, and both presidents Bush. Gerald R. Ford looks over Mr Trump’s shoulder, while Richard M. Nixon sits nearby.

Theodore Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and last but not least, Abraham Lincoln, all smile admiringly as Mr Trump beams.

It’s an image that you’d think was a joke, the presidential equivalent of those paintings on black velvet of dogs playing poker. Here in the States, we sometimes call that “art sold by the side of the road”, since vendors set up in tents next to petrol stations or highway exits.

In fact, the grouping is part of a series, according to Mr Thomas, who has painted Republican as well as Democratic presidents playing poker and pool.

And, it’s a copy, since Mr Thomas owns the original.

As Mr Thomas explained to NBC, the print was a gift to Mr Trump from Darrell Issa, a California Republican congressman. Mr Thomas said Mr Trump called to thank him after he received it.

Trump didn’t look this good in the ’90s

And no wonder he’d be pleased.

For one thing, his portrayal is artfully flattering. I met Mr Trump in his youthful prime in the 1990s, and he didn’t look this good back then.

Nor were his television producers able to bring off such glowing good health during his years on The Apprentice, no matter how many filters or camera angles they tried.

On Twitter, the joke was that he’d been painted to look like “a Kennedy with a combover”, and clearly, he has a vision in his head of looking something like this. Think of all the times he’s said that news organizations take terrible photographs of him.

And, Mr Trump isn’t the only dignitary who prefers to see himself painted at his best. There’s a legendary story about Winston Churchill’s displeasure with a portrait by Graham Sutherland, meant to be a tribute from the British Houses of Parliament on his 80th birthday.

The Netflix series The Crown shows Churchill’s rage at the too-accurate painting, although it fudges the circumstances under which it was banished from view.

It was actually Churchill’s wife, Clementine, who ordered it destroyed after his death because her husband disliked it. (A study for it still is in the possession of the National Portrait Gallery.)

White House reflects president who lives there

Since the president gets to choose both the artist and the scene for his official portrait, it’s likely sometime in the 2020s that Mr Trump’s likeness will be at least as flattering as what Mr Thomas has already painted.

Moreover, it’s likely to stand out from the other official portraits, and the other artwork in the White House offices and hallways, just as Mr Trump’s protocol-smashing tenure has been a vivid contrast to the behaviour of other presidents.

I can’t help but think, however, about the famed artists whose work has been displayed in the White House.

They include Gilbert Stuart, famed for his full-length depiction of George Washington and Dolley Payne Madison, the wife of James Madison.

One of my favourites is John Singer Sargent’s portrait of Theodore Roosevelt, which makes the famous Rough Rider look as if he is about to bolt off the canvas.

Among the 45 pictures chosen by the Obamas for the White House were paintings by Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper and Georgia O’Keefe, as well as African-American artists such as Jacob Lawrence and William H. Johnson.

In every way, a White House reflects the president who lives there. And its current occupant apparently enjoys seeing himself on a wall, having a Diet Coke with his predecessors.

At least we won’t be surprised once his official portrait is unveiled.

Micheline Maynard is a journalist and author.

Topics: donald-trump, politics-and-government, government-and-politics, world-politics, united-states

First posted October 16, 2018 16:37:01

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Opinion: Trump painting: Dogs playing poker or Kennedy with a combover?

Updated October 16, 2018 16:57:21

Many people may not realise that the White House is a museum, as well as the home of the American president and a place of government business.

Its rooms and hallways contain a heralded collection of furniture, china, statues, and most of all, paintings, both works of art, and depictions of history.

Every president and first lady is commemorated with a portrait, commissioned toward the end of their time in the White House, and hung a few years after they leave.

But Donald Trump, it seems, is not waiting to make sure his face hangs in the White House.

This weekend, the nation learnt through an interview on 60 Minutes that he is already on the wall of his private office.

Mr Trump appears in a fanciful grouping, enjoying cocktails with former presidents from the Republican party. (A teetotaller, his glass contains his favoured Diet Coke.)

The painting, called The Republican Club, is by artist Andy Thomas. He told NBC News that he was shocked to see it hanging in the White House.

Reagan, Nixon, Eisenhower, Lincoln … Trump?

I was pretty gobsmacked, too, given what I know about the building’s carefully curated decor.

The group includes Ronald Reagan, and both presidents Bush. Gerald R. Ford looks over Mr Trump’s shoulder, while Richard M. Nixon sits nearby.

Theodore Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and last but not least, Abraham Lincoln, all smile admiringly as Mr Trump beams.

It’s an image that you’d think was a joke, the presidential equivalent of those paintings on black velvet of dogs playing poker. Here in the States, we sometimes call that “art sold by the side of the road”, since vendors set up in tents next to petrol stations or highway exits.

In fact, the grouping is part of a series, according to Mr Thomas, who has painted Republican as well as Democratic presidents playing poker and pool.

And, it’s a copy, since Mr Thomas owns the original.

As Mr Thomas explained to NBC, the print was a gift to Mr Trump from Darrell Issa, a California Republican congressman. Mr Thomas said Mr Trump called to thank him after he received it.

Trump didn’t look this good in the ’90s

And no wonder he’d be pleased.

For one thing, his portrayal is artfully flattering. I met Mr Trump in his youthful prime in the 1990s, and he didn’t look this good back then.

Nor were his television producers able to bring off such glowing good health during his years on The Apprentice, no matter how many filters or camera angles they tried.

On Twitter, the joke was that he’d been painted to look like “a Kennedy with a combover”, and clearly, he has a vision in his head of looking something like this. Think of all the times he’s said that news organizations take terrible photographs of him.

And, Mr Trump isn’t the only dignitary who prefers to see himself painted at his best. There’s a legendary story about Winston Churchill’s displeasure with a portrait by Graham Sutherland, meant to be a tribute from the British Houses of Parliament on his 80th birthday.

The Netflix series The Crown shows Churchill’s rage at the too-accurate painting, although it fudges the circumstances under which it was banished from view.

It was actually Churchill’s wife, Clementine, who ordered it destroyed after his death because her husband disliked it. (A study for it still is in the possession of the National Portrait Gallery.)

White House reflects president who lives there

Since the president gets to choose both the artist and the scene for his official portrait, it’s likely sometime in the 2020s that Mr Trump’s likeness will be at least as flattering as what Mr Thomas has already painted.

Moreover, it’s likely to stand out from the other official portraits, and the other artwork in the White House offices and hallways, just as Mr Trump’s protocol-smashing tenure has been a vivid contrast to the behaviour of other presidents.

I can’t help but think, however, about the famed artists whose work has been displayed in the White House.

They include Gilbert Stuart, famed for his full-length depiction of George Washington and Dolley Payne Madison, the wife of James Madison.

One of my favourites is John Singer Sargent’s portrait of Theodore Roosevelt, which makes the famous Rough Rider look as if he is about to bolt off the canvas.

Among the 45 pictures chosen by the Obamas for the White House were paintings by Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper and Georgia O’Keefe, as well as African-American artists such as Jacob Lawrence and William H. Johnson.

In every way, a White House reflects the president who lives there. And its current occupant apparently enjoys seeing himself on a wall, having a Diet Coke with his predecessors.

At least we won’t be surprised once his official portrait is unveiled.

Micheline Maynard is a journalist and author.

Topics: donald-trump, politics-and-government, government-and-politics, world-politics, united-states

First posted October 16, 2018 16:37:01

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Royal Wedding 2018 news LIVE: Updates as Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank prepare to marry in Windsor

Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank shared a kiss on the steps of St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle after getting married today in front of a star-studded audience.

The Queen’s granddaughter’s wedding to Mr Brooksbank, 32, took place at the same chapel where the Duke and Duchess of Sussex married earlier this year.

The couple then went on a carriage procession through the city’s streets.

The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh, the Prince of Wales, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex were all in attendance for the grand royal celebration, joining an 850-strong congregation of celebrities, royals and VIP guests.

Here we brought you live coverage of the event, as it happened.

Live Updates

2018-10-10T20:59:38.153Z

Welcome to our coverage of the second royal wedding of the year. Follow this page for the latest updates from the wedding of Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank.

2018-10-11T01:57:09.480Z

Princess Eugenie is counting down the hours to her lavish royal wedding.
The Queen’s grand-daughter has just one day to go until she says her marriage vows to tequila brand ambassador Jack Brooksbank in the gothic surrounds of St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle.
Some 850 guests will gather in the historic surroundings where the Duke and Duchess of Sussex wed five months ago.

2018-10-11T01:57:50.613Z

Harry and Meghan and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are expected to be among the guests on Friday, along with the Queen and a host of royals.
Celebrity guests will include former Take That singer Robbie Williams and his wife and fellow X Factor judge Ayda Field.
Williams’ six-year-old daughter Theodora is taking a starring role as a bridesmaid, alongside five-year-old Prince George and three-year-old Princess Charlotte.

2018-10-11T02:03:56.703Z

Celebrity guests will include former Take That singer Robbie Williams and his wife and fellow X Factor judge Ayda Field.
Williams’ six-year-old daughter Theodora is taking a starring role as a bridesmaid, alongside five-year-old Prince George and three-year-old Princess Charlotte.
Royal fans will be hoping for some fun-filled antics from the young helpers in the bridal party, which include Zara and Mike Tindall’s spirited four-year-old Mia and Peter and Autumn Phillips’ daughters Savannah and Isla.
Maud Windsor, who is Eugenie’s goddaughter and the daughter of Lord Frederick Windsor and his actress wife Sophie Winkleman, is also a bridesmaid.
Future king George will be joined by fellow page boy Louis de Givenchy – the six-year-old son of JP Morgan banking executive Olivier de Givenchy and his wife Zoe.
The Queen’s youngest grandchildren, 14-year-old Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor and 10-year-old Viscount Severn, who are the children of the Earl and Countess of Wessex, will take on the role of Special Attendants.
William and Kate’s youngest child Prince Louis, who is only five and a half months old, is too young to attend and will be staying at home.

2018-10-11T06:41:58.543Z

London-based cake designer Sophie Cabot will be making a red velvet and chocolate cake for the wedding. The cake is set to be a traditional cake, “with a modern feel”.

2018-10-11T07:25:41.480Z

Where can I watch the royal wedding?

Princess Eugenie’s ceremony is being screened in full on ITV as part of a special three-hour This Morning show live from Windsor, hosted by Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford. 

Broadcast footage will also be live streamed on The Royal Channel and The Duke of York’s YouTube channels, and the royal family and Andrew’s Facebook pages.

The ceremony begins at 11am and will take place in the gothic surrounds of St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle. 

2018-10-11T09:13:44.220Z

Excitement is building ahead of the big day, with scores of royal fans saying they are looking forward to tomorrow’s ceremony.

2018-10-11T11:25:50.880Z

Camilla will not be attending the wedding tomorrow “due to long-standing engagement at school in Scotland”.

The Duchess of Cornwall will instead be in Scotland as the wedding takes place in Windsor because it clashes with a long-standing engagement to visit the Crathie primary school near Balmoral. 

Read more on the news of Camilla’s expected absence below: 

2018-10-11T11:31:51.950Z

Who is Princess Eugenie marrying? 

Eugenie is set to marry Jack Brooksbank, 32, who she has been dating for around seven years. 

The Stowe-educated socialite was the manager of Mayfair hotspot Mahiki – a favourite haunt of the Duke of Sussex and Eugenie’s sister Princess Beatrice.

He is now the European brand manager of Casamigos Tequila, which was co-founded by actor George Clooney.

According to Tatler, he’s an excellent skier and the pair met through mutual friends while on a ski trip to Verbier. He has also said his dream is to start a chain of pubs.

2018-10-11T12:35:29.570Z

Many tourists visiting Windsor ahead of Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank’s wedding had not realised it was taking place – but one family flew in from the US specifically to get a good view.

Debbie Barnes, 46, and her mother Pat Shaw, 72, who travelled from Boston, said they had always been “huge fans” of the royal family and did not want to miss the big day.

Mrs Shaw said: “Ever since I was a little girl I always dreamed of being a princess or a queen and living in a wonderful castle – I still do and I’m 72. I just love the royal family. I think they’re great.

“I think the Queen is remarkable the way she evolved and changed and adapted.”

Also present was Mrs Barnes’ daughter, Emma Barnes, 17, and father Joe Shaw, 75.

Joe Shaw with his granddaughter Emma Barnes, wife Pat and daughter Debbie Barnes 46, in Windsor (PA)
2018-10-11T13:27:03.743Z

Police have been conducting security searches around Windsor ahead of the wedding.

Police conduct searches in Windsor (PA)
Drains checked by police ahead of the ceremony on Friday
2018-10-11T15:20:18.633Z

South Western Railway warns that Windsor station may be busier than normal

The train operator has warned on Twitter that stations may be busier than normal on Friday due to the Royal Wedding. 

Customers have been asked to check their journey before travelling. 

2018-10-11T15:24:43.060Z

For those wishing to see the happy couple tomorrow, here is the carriage procession route: 

2018-10-11T15:38:41.840Z

Royal superfans are beginning to line the streets ahead of tomorrow’s ceremony

Sky London, 58, is already camping out on Windsor’s streets (Press Association)

Royal superfan Sky London is camping out this evening ahead of the ceremony. 

He camped out for a whole week ahead of the marriages of Kate and William and Meghan and Harry, and for two weeks ahead of the births of Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis. 

He said: “People are saying, ‘she’s ninth or 10th in line to the throne, why are you getting excited about it?’ But all weddings in the royal family are exciting to me. It doesn’t matter who it is – all princes and princesses.”

2018-10-11T16:00:55.483Z

Royal wedding security predicted to cost around £2 million

While no official figures have been released, the cost of policing Harry and Meghan’s wedding has been estimated at between £2 million and £4 million by the region’s police and crime commissioner. 

With Princess Eugenie’s wedding being held at the same venue with a similar procession through the streets, many predict security will place a similar burden onto the taxpayer. 

2018-10-11T16:13:16.250Z

Inside Princess Beatrice and Eugenie’s famous set

When Prince Harry married Meghan Markle earlier this year, we got a good insight into the couple’s famous friendship circle. Oprah was there, as were the Beckhams, the Clooneys and long-time friend to the Prince, Elton John.

2018-10-11T16:31:02.166Z

Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank pictured leaving their rehearsal 

(Reuters)
The couple were pictured leaving the rehearsal (Reuters)
2018-10-11T16:32:15.730Z

From our reporter Barney Davis in Windsor: 

2018-10-11T16:47:32.460Z

More images of Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank leaving Windsor Castle 

(Reuters)
(Reuters)

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Writer Aruna D’Sousa and UCSD Professor Nicole Miller visit Mesa College

Art in America – involving race, censorship and free speech – often offensive towards members of the black community, should not be used by artists, curators or museums to generate profit:  Was the topic of a conversation with writer and art critic Aruna D’Sousa and filmmaker and UCSD Professor, Nicole Miller, at San Diego Mesa College on Oct. 8.

 

Speaking to an audience of approximately 200, mostly students and some faculty, D’Sousa and Miller conducted an engaging discussion, giving recent and historical examples of art in America which has angered many, resulting in protest in galleries and on social media, as well as raising issues of free speech and censorship.

 

D’Sousa, author of the book “Whitewalling: Art, Race & Protest in 3 Acts,” said the subject of who is allowed to address issues of race in America, resulted in massive protest from the community, when a rich white artist, Dana Shutz, created “Open Casket,” a contemporary painting of  Emmitt Till’s mutilated body in a casket, for the 2017 Whitney Biennial.

 

Protesters, D’Sousa said, were asking, “is it appropriate for a white artist to take up this particular subject matter?”  They were also saying, D’Sousa continued, “these issues, which has almost never been taken up by black artist, because these images are so resonate, and sacred.”

 

The protest of “Open Casket,” ironically, said D’Sousa, also brought about an incredible backlash of people complaining that the work of Shutz was being censured, “how dare they try to censure Dana Shutz?” was the response, said D’Sousa,

 

D’Sousa said she was not upset with Shutz, because Shutz said she created the painting to show solidarity with a mother whose son was murdered.

 

Miller, winner of a John Gughenheim Foundation Award, chimed in, “I saw it as an obvious act of Shutz trying to make beautiful, something that was horrendous,” she said.

 

“For me, it was just technically a bad artwork,” Miller continued.

 

Audience member Kimi Morino, 26, Art major at Mesa, expressed her appreciation for the discussion.  “As an artist, it made me think about how i will present my art,” she said.

 

A 1979 art exhibition by a young white artist, presented another offensive expression towards blacks, said  D’Sousa, “he used the most incendiary, racist term in the English language, to title his show.”

 

D’Sousa said when people asked the art gallery why he used that term, they were told by the staff that he was making his charcoal drawing and at the end of the day, his arms were covered with black charcoal, which was how he derived the term to name his drawing.

 

D’Sousa explained further, that this painting was likewise defended by many respectable people in the art community, many who had taught and influenced her.

 

Miller, who has had solo exhibits at: Ballroom Marfa, Centre D’art Contemporain Geneva and California African American Museum in Los Angeles chimed in, “it was heart-breaking,” she said.

 

Miller continued, “These were people who became central to art criticism in our history and in New York, they were on the wrong side of this issue.”

 

A third art event covered in D’Sousa’s work was the exhibit “Harlem on my mind”, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

 

This exhibit, D’Sousa explained, was aimed at demonstrating that The Met “was welcoming to all audiences, not just a place for white people.”

 

“(The Met)  hired black staff and (consulted) with an advisory committee of Harlem residents.”  Said D’Sous.  Yet, “it didn’t include a single work, painting or sculpture, by African American artist in the show.”  As a result, D’Sousa continued, Harlem on my mind created one of the biggest protest in US history.

 

“Those protest of relatively small groups of people, were bad-ass, and managed to leverage their voices in ways that required the museum to disburse part of its collection…that’s why you have the Bronx Museum of Art and Queens Museum of Art,” she said.

 

 

 

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RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Selling soul for physical upgrades?

City planning to auction off expensive painting to fund improvements at Legler Library

Monday, October 15th, 2018 3:24 PM

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The Chicago Public Library system is looking to give the West Side something it hasn’t had in decades — a library that’s open on Sundays and has longer weekday hours than regular neighborhood branch libraries. It just needs to sell a painting.

The library system is made up of the main Harold Washington Library, two regional libraries and dozens of neighborhood branch libraries. The regional libraries are meant to be smaller versions of the main library, with longer hours and more resources than the neighborhood branches. 

But while the North Side has Sulzer Regional Library and the South Side has Woodson Regional Library, the West Side hasn’t had a regional library of its own since 1977, when West Garfield Park’s Legler Library, 115 S. Pulaski Road, was converted into a neighborhood branch library. 

Now, CPL is looking to restore Legler Library’s regional status, increasing hours and adding more programs in 2019. But to pay for those improvements, the library system and the city plan to auction off “Knowledge & Wonder,” a painting critically acclaimed artist Kerry James Marshall created specifically for Legler. 

According to Art News magazine, the painting could fetch “between $10 million and $15 million by Christie’s in New York, where it will go to auction this fall.”

Although CPL officials described selling the painting as a difficult, but necessary choice, critics — Marshall himself — argued that the city and the library system should have figured out some other way to fund the upgrade.

Legler is the oldest library facility to still be operating on the West Side. According to CPL, it was built in 1920 and named after Henry Legler, who served as the system’s chief librarian from 1909 to 1917. The site also notes that it was actually the first regional library in Chicago. 

Patrick Molloy, the CPL’s director of government and public affairs, said that the staff is still looking through historical documents to figure out why Legler lost its regional status. He said that their best theory so far is that the library was part of a system that put more focus on branch libraries. 

Even after losing its regional status, Legler wasn’t entirely neglected. It went through several renovations. Most recently, it underwent a $913,000 renovation starting in 2017. In addition, Legler was the first West Side library to get the YOUmedia space, a multimedia space geared toward teens.

“Knowledge and Wonder” was commissioned by the city in 1995 as part of the Percent for Art program, which required that, at least 1.33 percent of the construction costs of renovated or newly built municipal buildings go toward adding public art. 

Marshall, who currently lives in Chicago, is a black artist who uses his paintings to challenge stereotypes and preconceptions about African-Americans. True to form, “Knowledge and Wonder” depicts black kids and a few adults staring at a wall of giant books.

According to CPL’s website, Marshall’s piece isn’t the only piece of art in the building. Legler also had a carved wood sculpture by Elizabeth Catlett and a Great Depression era mural, “Wilderness, Winter River Scene,” by Midwestern artist R. Fayerweather Babcock. 

The press release on the site went into some of the planned improvements, saying that they would include “the addition of multiple community and study spaces, an increase in collections, new lighting and building systems, accessibility improvements, and parking lot and security enhancements.”

The press release also mentions that the children’s area would be upgraded to a children’s library similar to Thomas Hughes Children’s Library that takes up a significant portion of Harold Washington Library’s second floor. 

The YOUmedia space would be expanded to include a “state of the art sound studio.” For adults, the library will have a much larger computer lab and adult workforce training on the second floor. 

Legler will also get a free Maker Space — a first for the West Side. In a first for the CPL system as a whole, the library system plans to set up a studio space where an artist in residence “will develop art projects and host adult, teen and family arts programs.”

“There’s no dedicated art studio in our branches or regionals,” Molloy said. “That’s something we’re really excited about.”

He went on to explain that Legler has a great deal of underutilized space. This gives CPL a greater opportunity to build something new and modern, something that reflects the patrons’ needs.

“The goal is to invest [in the building] and make it a fully functional, 21th century regional library,” Molloy said.

He also told this newspaper that all those plans represent a wish list of what CPL would do with the money. The details may change once they actually know how much the painting sells for.

In a statement to media, Ald. Jason Ervin (28th), whose ward includes Legler Library, described the sale of Marshall’s painting as a win for the West Side.

“We are proud to have had Kerry James Marshall’s artwork in our community for a long time and we are so thrilled it will now help us transform a critical neighborhood anchor not only for West Garfield Park, but for the entire West Side community,” he stated. 

“This is a proud example of how city officials come together to find innovative ways to positive changes to our city.”

But the idea that the improvements would come at the cost of selling a piece of art meant for the community struck many the wrong way. 

“I am certain they could get more money if they sold the Picasso sculpture in Daley Plaza,” he told Art News magazine. 

“Considering that only last year Mayor Emanuel and Commissioner [of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs Mark] Kelly dedicated another mural I designed downtown for which I was asked to accept one dollar,” Marshall added, “you could say the City of Big Shoulders has wrung every bit of value they could from the fruits of my labor.”

There is a question of long-term sustainability. In the past, CPL cited salaries and other employee-related expenses as major reason why branch libraries couldn’t stay open longer than they currently are.  

Molloy said that the sale of the painting would only cover the improvements themselves, and acknowledged that CPL would have to cover the day-to-day costs some other way. He said that those specifics won’t be decided until the paintings are sold.

“I think we’re all comfortable that we’re able to move forward,” Molloy said. “Specifics, we will need to finalize.”

While the press release mentions that the changes would start to take effect at the beginning of next year, Molloy said that while this is when CPL would ideally want to phase the changes in the actual timeline will depend on when the painting is sold.

“The way I understand it is, they have two big auctions — one in November, one in May,” Molloy said.

CONTACT: igorst3@hotmail.com    

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

The 75 Best Things To Do in Seattle This Week: Oct 15-21, 2018

SAM’s Peacock in the Desert: The Royal Arts of Jodhpur, India exhibition, which opens this Thursday, welcomes visitors with an immersive recreation of a royal wedding procession, complete with life-size horse and elephant mannequins. Installation View: Peacock in the Desert: The Royal Arts of Jodhpur, India at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, photo: Will Michels

Our music critics have already chosen the 42 best music shows this week, but now it’s our arts critics’ turn. Here are their picks for the best events in every genre—from Seattle Restaurant Week to the opening of The Vikings Begin, and from an evening with living legend Carol Burnett to a play about a demon-obsessed artist, Night Parade. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

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Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday


MONDAY

PERFORMANCE

Stuff You Missed In History Class
On their popular podcast, Holly Frey and Tracy V. Wilson unearth historical events that have been unjustly neglected in the books, like “the decades-long dispute between butter and margarine,” “a pair of lions that terrorized a railroad crew in Kenya,” and “the only successful coup d’état in American history.”

READINGS & TALKS

Rebecca Brown: Not Heaven, Somewhere Else
Lambda Literary Award and Stranger Genius Award winner Rebecca Brown has been called “one of the few truly original modern lesbian writers” by the San Francisco Chronicle (seems like unnecessary shade on lesbians, but whatever) and “dry, witty, graceful — if savage” by novelist Mary Gaitskill. Brown’s newest publication, Not Heaven, Somewhere Else, is a collection of imaginative short stories. She’ll appear with Jennifer Borges Foster.

Rene Redzepi and David Zilber: The Noma Guide to Fermentation
The legendary, two-Michelin-starred restaurant Noma in Copenhagen has been named the best restaurant in the world four times, and fermentation plays a pivotal role in its superlative, complex food—every dish on the menu contains fermentation in some form. Rene Redzepi, the chef and owner of Noma, and David Zilber, the chef in charge of the restaurant’s fermentation lab, have written The Noma Guide to Fermentation, in which they divulge their secrets and techniques for home cooks to re-create. At this event, they’ll discuss their new book with an interactive presentation and tasting that includes a treat prepared by Rachael Coyle and the Coyle’s Bakeshop team. JULIANNE BELL

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY

ART

Nightmare of Ages
The young, self-taught Canadian illustrator and comics artist Dewey Guyen is a perfect guest for the eccentric art collective Push/Pull, given his penchant for the satanic, monstrous, and punk themes often mined by Push/Pull’s members. He harks back to album covers, Francisco Goya’s fearsome brutes, cartoons, and psychedelia. Guyen and friends will be releasing a book featuring images by other artists, including Farel Dalrymple, Seth Goodkind, Angelita Martinez, Heidi Estey, and other wonderful weirdos, with Guyen’s drawings on vellum overlaying their designs. JOULE ZELMAN
Closing Wednesday

MONDAY-THURSDAY

ART

Magalie Guérin: The Marfa Paintings
Chicago-based artist Magalie Guérin makes abstract paintings that distort perceptions of foreground and background through colorful biomorphic and geometric forms.
Closing Thursday

Orchids and Evergreens: Thai and Seattle Printmakers
Seattle Print Arts, with the help of Nikki Barber and Miranda Metcalf, brings together floral prints from artists in Chiang Mai and Bangkok as well as in the Northwest. See work by, among others, Seattleites Claire Cowie, Kim Van Someren, and Romson Bustillo and Thailanders Kittikong Tilokwattan, Orn Thongthai, and Srijai Kuntawang.
Closing Thursday

MONDAY-FRIDAY

ART

Chun Shao: Silicone Love – Her Garden
The internet generates and absorbs our desires, giving scopophilia—the pleasure of watching—an almost infinite playground. If this virtualized realm of desire were condensed into a single form, what would it look like? DXARTS PhD candidate Chun Shao makes “video-mapped gestural sculptures” that may provide an unsettling response. You can find a previous riff on this idea, Silicone Love – Her Finger, on Vimeo: a pulsing, illuminated, jellyfish-like object made of a lampshade, motors, baubles, and gauze. Like the Web, as you look into it, it yields and responds to your imagination. JOULE ZELMAN
Closing Friday

Emily Sudd: Sitting in the Dark
Los Angeles artist and university instructor Emily Sudd is becoming known for cheeky, sometimes literal mash-ups of utilitarian ceramic objects and post-minimalist sculptures, like plates and vessels jammed onto an easel-perched canvas or a bisected vase full of melted ceramic detritus. In this exhibition, her 3-D pieces will be accompanied by stainless-steel jewelry chains strung into tapestry-like arrangements. Some are elegant, others rough, chunky, and even downright ugly. Some evoke destructive processes; others seem purely abstract, yet eschew formalism through the use of unconventional materials. All toy with the distinctions between art, junk, implement, and decoration. JOULE ZELMAN
Opening Friday

MONDAY-SUNDAY

FILM

TWIST Seattle Queer Film Festival
Local shorts, indie features, and national or international releases will stoke and satisfy your appetite for gay, lesbian, bi, trans, and otherwise queer-focused films, from hot romances to incisive documentaries to perverse suspense flicks. The closing film will be Rafiki, Kenyan director Wanuri Kahiu’s landmark work—banned in her home country for its “clear intent to promote lesbianism.” Other highlights will include biopics of Mapplethorpe and Montgomery Clift, and the film history doc Dykes, Camera, Action! If you love queer movies and moviemakers, this festival is indispensable.

TUESDAY

ART

Yəhaw̓ Artist Residency – Native Kut
Artists-in-residence Pah-tu Pitt and Sean Gallagher will carve and print in the library, creating work around the theme of water rights.

READINGS & TALKS

Seattle Think & Drink: Fake News and Conspiracy Theories
Conspiracy theories are nothing new, but with the onslaught of fake news that pervades our eyes and ears, they’re certainly more common. How can we spot fear-mongering misinformation and stop it from spreading? Humanities Washington will lead a panel discussion on the subject with “experts at the front lines of the information wars:” Snopes.com founder David Mikkelson and University of Washington Professors Kate Starbird and Jevin West.

Ted Chiang and Karen Joy Fowler in Conversation
Last year’s lauded sci-fi film Arrival was based on Ted Chiang’s short fiction “The Story of Your Life,” which combined a gorgeously nerdy and profound examination of alien grammar with a sad and equally profound exploration of love and fate. Which is to say, Ted Chiang is a genius, and “The Story of Your Life” should be viewed as a gateway to his body of literature, not a companion to Denis Villeneuve’s (admittedly pretty cool) movie. Chiang will appear with PEN/Faulkner Award winner Karen Joy Fowler, author of The Jane Austen Book Club, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, and many smart, emotional, literary spooky stories. JOULE ZELMAN

TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Julia Turshen: Now and Again
Food writer and activist Julia Turshen has coauthored cookbooks with the likes of Gwyneth Paltrow, Mario Batali, and Dana Cowin. Her debut cookbook under her own name, Small Victories, was a breakout hit of 2016, praised for its warm, witty voice and comforting recipes (my own copy is well-worn and splatter-stained, as any cookbook worth its salt should be). Turshen is also a staunch advocate for social justice: Her second outing, Feed the Resistance, offered both recipes and suggestions for activism in equal measure, and she also founded Equity at the Table, an online database of women and nonbinary people working in the food industry. Turshen’s latest cookbook, Now and Again, is full of inspiring menus for entertaining accompanied by suggestions for how to repurpose leftovers. At this event, she’ll discuss the new book with local author Molly Wizenberg and sign copies purchased at the shop. JULIANNE BELL

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Cirque du Soleil: VOLTA
Every Cirque du Soleil show I’ve experienced has abounded with breathtaking, eye-popping visuals as well as awe-inspiring feats of movement by Cirque’s cast of dancers, physical actors, athletes, and circus performers (acrobats, contortionists, aerialists, and the like), all within a big tent. The subject matter of VOLTA, Cirque’s 41st production, involves extreme sports, touching on (but not limited to) shape diving, BMX, and rope skipping. One fan said it was “absolutely spectacular,” so don’t miss this Marymoor Park run. LEILANI POLK

Come From Away
What happens when kind island people who live in the poorest province in Canada realize that they have to play host to a bunch of irritated, scared, and stranded “plane people” who nearly outnumber them? They help. Instantly, food comes off the store shelves, the hockey rink becomes cold storage, and every home’s a hotel. An indicative line, given by an actor playing a clerk: “Thank you for shopping at Wal-Mart. Would you like to come back to my house for a shower?” This is the strong, uplifting premise of Come From Away. Normally, I’m a stone when it comes to musicals. But by minute six or seven, I was smiling at all the small town charm and rooting for the spirit these people projected. RICH SMITH

Oslo
Oslo won a Tony for its dramatization of the top-secret peace negotiations between Rabin and Arafat in the 1990s. The diplomatic talks were, weirdly, orchestrated by young Norwegian power-couple Mona Juul and Terje Rød-Larsen. Expect lots of long gray coats, wary handshakes, dark humor, and fine acting from Christine Marie Brown and Avery Clark. RICH SMITH

A Thousand Splendid Suns
Based on Khaled Hosseini’s best-selling novel, Ursula Rani Sarma’s play A Thousand Splendid Suns shows what happens when two women, Laila and Mariam, join in unbreakable friendship in wartime Kabul.

WEDNESDAY

FILM

Schlock and Awe: Reagan-Era Horror
Deregulation and out-of-control greed were not the only horrors of the Reagan reign. The Forum celebrates slashers, mutants, and gore in a deep dive into the paranoia and excess of the era, and boy does that sound like a fun escape from our own hellscape. Tonight’s film is the “people are worse than zombies!!!” George Romero film Day of the Dead.

FOOD & DRINK

Christopher Kimball: Milk Street: Tuesday Nights
You may recognize Christopher Kimball as the bespectacled, bow-tied personality formerly associated with America’s Test Kitchen and Cook’s Illustrated. Kimball has since started his own enterprise called Milk Street, composed of magazines, cookbooks, and a broadcast show. He’ll drop by Seattle to discuss his new book, Milk Street: Tuesday Nights—filled with a trove of speedy weeknight dishes like Cuban-spiced burgers and pasta with seared cauliflower—and to sign copies. JULIANNE BELL

Meet Me at Cone & Steiner: Adria Shimada of Parfait Ice Cream
Parfait Ice Cream owner Adria Shimada will talk about her French-influenced organic ice cream and answer questions, and you’ll get to sample it.

READINGS & TALKS

David Reich: Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human Past
Geneticist David Reich will explain how genomics is revealing the history of modern humans with excerpts from his book Who We Are and How We Got Here. It sounds fascinating and provocative: “Reich suggests that there might very well be biological differences among human populations—many of which are unlikely to conform to common stereotypes.”

Jodi Picoult: A Spark of Light
The prolific author of My Sister’s Keeper and other hits has a new novel that sounds scarily relevant. It’s about a reproductive health center held up by a gunman; a police hostage negotiator; and his teenage daughter, who’s trapped inside.

Kevin Young: Bunk and the Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phones, Post-Facts, and Fake News
The award-winning author of Bunk will share expertise for his book on American fakery and imposture, from PT Barnum to Rachel Dolezal, for the UW Public Lecture Series on misinformation and news.

WordsWest: Stacey Levine & Anca Szilágyi
Two brilliant local authors will discuss their magical realist books about women and girls who rebel against the confines of their worlds. Anca Szilágyi wowed us last year with Daughters of the Air, about the daughter of a dissident in Argentina; Stacey Levine won a Stranger Genius Award and a PEN/West Fiction Award for her novels and short stories. 

WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

The Turn of the Screw
In 1954, English composer Benjamin Britten (1913–1976) premiered his opera based on Henry James’s ghost story The Turn of the Screw. Its music is darkly gorgeous, jolting, manic at times, and often outright scary. In key sequences involving the children in the story, the atonal sounds float like a ghost in a room of mirrors. Anyone familiar with the Portishead track “Cowboys” will already have a good sense of how this echo-stark opera sounds. Because the opera is as much about ghosts as sexual abuse of women and children, it provides new and important meanings for our #MeToo moment. CHARLES MUDEDE

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Gravity Jokes
When a joke “goes over well,” we say that it “lands.” Sometimes a joke doesn’t land because it “misses the mark” or “sails over the heads” of its intended audience. What is it about comedy that invites so many comparisons to the trajectories of flying, falling objects? In Gravity Jokes, dubbed an “experimental exhibition-as-conversation” by curator Molly Mac, six artists who create work on a “continuum between traditional sculpture and stand-up comedy” have come together to tell jokes of all forms that collaborate with the forces of gravity: Dewa Dorje, Andy Fallat, Philippe Hyojung Kim, Mario Lemafa, E.T. Russian, and Khadija Ann Tarver. EMILY POTHAST
Closing Saturday

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Beware the Terror of Gaylord Manor
The world-famous Seattle-based drag queen BenDeLaCreme has written and performed three acclaimed solo shows, but Beware the Terror of Gaylord Manor is the artist’s first foray into writing, directing, and starring in an original play of her own. It’s a spooky, campy twist on the horror flick genre, featuring ghosts, dancers, music, and special effects. It first premiered last year for a sold-out run at ACT, and returns this year surely with a few of its kinks worked out. The chemistry between BenDeLaCreme and Scott Shoemaker alone is worth the price of admission. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

Night Parade
The oldest Asian American theater group in the Pacific Northwest is teaming up with one of the area’s youngest Asian American-led theater groups to bring you an immersive theatrical experience that sounds perfect for people who want to indulge in the season’s devilry. The drama, which will unfold at a secret TBA location in Seattle, follows a demon-obsessed artist named Shunkuno Arashi, whose life story is partially based on Yayoi Kusama (Instagram it), as well as a Japanese folktale about demons parading down the street and stealing people. So, uh, keep your head on a swivel. RICH SMITH

READINGS & TALKS

A People’s History
Mike Daisey is back in town, as he often is, with a pretty simple but brilliant bit. He’s going to read you some pages from Good Will Hunting‘s favorite history book—Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States. Then he’s going to read you some pages from his high-school history book. Then we’re all going to sit there and have a little reflection session on the difference between history as told by the conquerors and history as told from the perspective of the dispossessed. RICH SMITH

THURSDAY

FOOD & DRINK

UMAMI – A Night of Hot Ramen and Hot Music
Want to put your spicy food tolerance to the test? Inspired by the recent “Nuclear Fire Noodle Challenge” trend on social media, in which heat-seeking masochists slurp a popular instant ramen that clocks in at 8,706 Scoville units, the Seattle Noodle Gang (self-described as “purveyors of beats and noodles”) will partner with Tsingtao to host “Seattle’s first ever hot ramen challenge,” complete with their own face-meltingly hot house-made ramen accompanied by DJ sets. The first 100 guests will get a free Noodle Gang enamel pin, and $1 from every Tsingtao beer sold will go to Seattle’s Union Gospel Mission.

PERFORMANCE

House of 1000 Arsons
Join Seattle’s most original queens for a toasty roast of Arson Nicki, a performer whom Stranger contributor Matt Baume has called an “unidentified frocking object.” Applaud and groan the witticisms of Americano, Beau Degas, Betty Wetter, Britt Brutality, Cookie Couture, and Londyn Bradshaw.

So You Think You Can Drag
In the “biggest and best drag competition ever” hosted by Cookie Couture, local queens both known and unknown will display their most impressive looks, lip-syncing abilities, and special talents each week in pursuit of a $5,000 grand prize.

READINGS & TALKS

Ben Fountain: Beautiful Country Burn Again
Ben Fountain is one of those writers who make you feel okay for not having published your groundbreaking novel before 40 years of age. He published his first book at 48—a heavily researched selection of short stories called Brief Encounters with Che Guevara—and published 2012’s best-selling Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk at 53. Now he turns from fiction to bring us Beautiful Country Burn Again, a book-length expansion of his 2016 essays on the US elections originally published in the Guardian. He’ll be joined in this talk by Maria Semple. RICH SMITH

Walter Mosley: John Woman
There is, in any cultural movement or form, a core logic that structures the whole. In classical black American music and literature, that logic is the blues. We hear it in the music of John Coltrane, and you can read it in the novels of Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and Ralph Ellison. More recently, it is in the plays of August Wilson and the mysteries of Walter Mosley, a writer known for the Ezekiel “Easy” Rawlins series. One of the novels in this series, Devil in a Blue Dress, was made into a superb film by Carl Franklin. He translated into film the core of so much black art, the blues. CHARLES MUDEDE

Word Works: Elizabeth George
George will discuss her method of plot planning, particularly for her British crime novel series starring Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers and Detective Inspector Thomas Lynley. How much does she map out before writing, and how has her process changed?

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

COMEDY

Ron Funches
Watch any Ron Funches clip on YouTube, or go to one of his live sets, and if you’re not in love with his gentle, quirky observations and off-kilter, ganja-logic transitions, you need to reassess your worldview. Dude is one of the funniest humans on Earth now. Funches may have lost a lot of weight recently, but rest assured: He’s still punching well above it with his endlessly unpredictable thoughts about whatever absurdities pop into his pot-enhanced mind. (“I like marijuana. It’s like getting a hug on your insides.”) This performance will be filmed for a TV special. DAVE SEGAL

PERFORMANCE

Andrew Schneider: YOUARENOWHERE
Obie Award–winning performer and “interactive-electronics artist” Andrew Schneider uses the idea of space-time collapse to shape this show. In addition to some extremely impressive special effects, he employs a “lecture-style format, pop culture, and personal revelation to dissect subjects ranging from quantum mechanics and parallel universes to missed connections and AA recovery steps.” RICH SMITH

I and You
Two teenagers—a boy and a deathly ill girl—argue and bond in Laura Gunderson’s “ode to youth, life, love, and the strange beauty of human connectedness.”

Ian Bell’s Brown Derby Series presents: Halloween
Ian Bell’s Brown Derby series, “ridiculously staged readings of your favorite screenplays,” celebrates 20 years in 2018, with send-ups of Valley of the Dolls and Dirty Dancing in February and June of this year, respectively. The third Brown Derby of 2018 pays homage to the spooktacular end-of-October holiday with a butchering of Halloween. I haven’t seen any of the Brown Derbys, but I’m told these things are always fucking hilarious, they happen at Re-bar (which means lots of boozing to lube up the communal laughing), and the promo flyer for this edition has the indelible Michael Myers mask Photoshopped onto Austin Powers’s body. Does this mean some sort of mash-up is in order? And how the fuck will they do it? I just don’t know, baby. LEILANI POLK

Vinegar Tom
In Caryn Churchill’s play set in Puritan New England, a mother and daughter are accused of witchcraft after the daughter refuses a man’s advances. Kaytlin McIntyre (Nadeshiko, Zapoi, The Lost Girls) will direct this Cornish production.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Peacock in the Desert: The Royal Arts of Jodhpur, India
Organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, in collaboration with the Mehrangarh Museum in Jodhpur, India, Peacock in the Desert is a traveling exhibition of some 250 artworks and objects that trace four centuries of royal history of the Rathore dynasty of Rajasthan, India. Most of these objects—which include miniature paintings, handcrafted armor, and carved furnishings—had never traveled to the United States prior to this exhibition. The installation at Seattle Art Museum will include large-scale photographic murals that evoke the geographic and historical context of these rare treasures. EMILY POTHAST
Opening celebration Thursday

FRIDAY

ART

The Factory presents: DRUGS
Top Seattle talents like Arson Nicki, Brett Hamil, Naa Akua, Jennifer Zwick, and others will spend an evening in artistic/literary/performative contemplation of drugs, whether prescribed, recreational, or metaphorical. Just Kaija will host.

COMEDY

Halloween Hell Harvest 3
If you’re very, very brave, venture forth to laugh and scream with these ghoulish pumpkins: host Matt Hatfield, comedians Haley Beglau, Gary Stensland, and others, and improv and sketch groups Sweaty Dee, Maple Daddies, Your Cousins, and more. Exercise your BRAAAAINS with horror trivia, win scary prizes, and eat candy—it’s probably delicious and definitely not made of HUMAN FLESH!

SAL Presents: Phoebe Robinson
During this podcast comedian and writer’s “Yaaas Queen Yaaas” tour with Ilana Glazer, Stranger contributor Jenni Moore wrote, “I enjoy that Robinson has mastered the art of dismantling the patriarchy and embracing diversity through her work, while also unabashedly celebrating all the white culture she loves.” Phoebe Robinson of WNYC Studios podcast/HBO special 2 Dope Queens will appear alone to share funny observations of her second book, Everything is Trash, But It’s Okay.

FOOD & DRINK

James Beard Foundation Taste America: Seattle Benefit Dinner
At this star-studded supper, the James Beard Foundation (named after the late, great cook and food writer) will bring together a stacked lineup of acclaimed local chefs all in one place, with chef Paul Shewchuck from the Fairmont Olympic Hotel serving as host. The evening starts off with Jay Blackinton of Hogstone’s Wood Oven (Orcas Island), Felipe Hernandez of Los Hernandez Tamales (Union Gap), Shota Nakajima of Adana (Capitol Hill), Mutsuko Soma of Kamonegi (Fremont), and Melissa Miranda of the Musang Seattle pop-up providing bites alongside cocktails. Next, “local all-star” chef Edouardo Jordan—who nabbed dual James Beard Award wins in 2018 when his raved-about Ravenna restaurant JuneBaby took home best new restaurant and his other restaurant Salare earned him Best Chef: Northwest—will create a sit-down dinner along with visiting James Beard Award winners Stuart Brioza and Nicole Krasinski of State Bird Provisions and the Progress in San Francisco, respectively. To finish, Brittany Bardeleben of Dahlia Bakery, Laura Pyles of the Pantry, and Artis Kalsons of 4th Ave Espresso Bar will serve desserts. This is a unique opportunity to catch a coterie of nationally recognized chefs all in one night—don’t miss it. JULIANNE BELL

PERFORMANCE

Sam Blackman | Mack Suits Baer | Coping Mechanism
Sam Blackman, a Moth GrandSLAM winner and raconteur of disparate things in “Newton, Copernicus, Click & Clack,” and Mack Suits Baer will return for second appearances at Solo Performance Month. They’ll be joined by recent Intiman Emerging Artist Courtney Seyl with a piece about grief and Sara Geiger with “An Afternoon Of Guided Meditation with INTERIM Pastor Chastity Joy.”

“Second Act” with Christine Deavel & J.W. (John) Marshall
The two former owners of Open Books, Christine Deavel and J.W. (John) Marshall, will read from their new play, Vicinity/Memoryall, about two people searching for a memorial to the victims of violence in their city. There will also be a screening of Sarah Linkatoon’s short film “Olive,” which won the 2018 Emerging Visions Filmmaker Award.

READINGS & TALKS

Henry Rollins
Comedian and musician Henry Rollins will give a special talk embellished with photos from around the world, from “Baghdad to Pyongyang.”

Kim Sagwa: Mina
Kim Sagwa is a rising young South Korean writer who’s won multiple awards and was granted a three-year residency in the USA as an “Alien of Extraordinary Ability in the Arts.” Her new novel, Mina, is about a frantic teenager driven to distraction by pressures of school and society. She’ll be joined by Bruce Fulton and Ju-Chan Fulton, her translators, as well as local poet Don Mee Choi.

Kirsten Sundberg Lunstrum: What We Do with the Wreckage
PEN/O. Henry Prize recipient Kirsten Sundberg Lunstrum writes about “finding resilience in the face of adversity” in her new collection of short fiction. She’ll introduce some of the stories’ inspiring characters at this reading.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Eirik Johnson
What motivates people to carve their initials into the bark of a living tree? This fall, local publisher Minor Matters will be releasing PINE, a book of new photography by Neddy-award winning artist Eirik Johson. For this body of work, Johnson has photographed found instances of tree graffiti, considering the circumstances that might have prompted people to leave such marks. To accompany these images, Johnson has commissioned a digital mixtape by an exciting roster of musicians including SassyBlack, Newaxeyes, Whiting Tennis, and Tenderfoot. This exhibition timed to the book’s release will showcase Johnson’s work in color photography, illuminated light boxes, and sound. EMILY POTHAST
Opening Friday

FESTIVALS

Leavenworth Oktoberfest
Leavenworth is as close as you’ll get to an actual Bavarian village without getting on a plane to Germany. For their Oktoberfest celebration, they’ll have beer, live music, and bratwurst. Leavenworth’s mayor, Cheri Kelley Farivar, will perform the ceremonial tapping of the keg on Saturday.

PERFORMANCE

Hostages
Yussef El Guindi won a Stranger Genius Award in 2015 for his ability to write clearly and honestly about moments of “displacement and discomfort—whether geographical, cultural, or sexual.” His genius for writing about discomfort will certainly be on full display in this new production of Hostages, a play about two college professors chained to a radiator after being taken hostage in a war zone. Expect lots of dark humor and intense drama. RICH SMITH

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

FILM

Kinofest
This short festival, co-organized with the Portland German Film Festival, screens new and classic German-language cinema from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. This year’s lineup includes some intriguing biopics, like Egon Schiele — Death and the Maiden, about the mesmerizingly morbid/erotic Austrian artist, and Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe, about the ill-fated Austrian Jewish writer of The Royal Game and Letter from an Unknown Woman. There’s also a drama about the clandestine Jewish survivors of the Nazi regime in Berlin, The Invisibles, a documentary following David Lama as he sets out to climb an insanely difficult Patagonia peak, Cerro Torre, and more.

Seattle Polish Film Festival
This film festival hailing from an important moviemaking center of Eastern Europe always has interesting features to offer.

PERFORMANCE

This Is Halloween
It’s Tim Burton’s classic The Nightmare Before Christmas repackaged as a semi-scandalous spectacle for the masses. The audience eats chicken skewers and knocks back $10 cocktails while they watch Tim Keller as Jack “the Pumpkin King” Skellington sing and dance, cabaret-style, along with Luminous Pariah, Paris Original, Marissa Quimby, and Baby Kate, while a ghoulish orchestra pumps out the show’s signature tunes. Despite the glitzy and consumerist exterior, the crew manages to smuggle a complicated cabaret about the horror of fixed identities into the unpretentious space of the Triple Door. RICH SMITH

SATURDAY

ART

Mort Cinder
One lifetime’s worth of witnessing strife and atrocity is hard enough. But what if every time you died, you came back to endure even more? The influential Argentinian comic Mort Cinder, written by Héctor Germán Oesterheld (aka HGO) and illustrated by Alberto Breccia in the early 1960s, is about one man weathering human depravity across time and space (including outer space). The weathered, tortured faces of murderers, soldiers, grave robbers, and adventurers are rendered in high-contrast black-and-white that will look familiar to fans of Frank Miller. Oesterheld was a left-winger with anti-totalitarian activities and writings—and in 1977, he, his three daughters, and their husbands were “disappeared” and presumably murdered. At long last, Oesterheld and Breccia’s creation will be issued in English by Fantagraphics, and HGO’s grandson Martin Oesterheld will be here to discuss its legacy. JOULE ZELMAN

COMEDY

Elena Martinez | Maia Alexander | Ryan Sanders | Clayton Weller
This Solo Performance Month night is a fourfer: See actor Ryan Sanders, hilarious improviser/sketch actor Elena Martinez, Clayton Weller (with a “Part Game, Part Show”), and Cornish grad Maia Alexander.

FOOD & DRINK

Duwamish Fry Bread Class
Learn how to make tasty, authentic fry bread with instructor Cecile Hansen.

PERFORMANCE

A Drag Tribute to Tim Burton
Old Witch and Londyn Bradshaw will pay tribute to the cinematic creations of brilliant weirdo Tim Burton, drag style.

Incident at Vichy
Arthur Miller’s play depicts the plight of a group of men plucked off the street and waiting their unknown fate in a police station in German-occupied France. Kelly Kitchens from Seattle Shakespeare and Seattle Public Theater will helm a cast from UW School of Drama, bringing this disturbingly relevant piece about widespread evil and the individual’s response.

Mixed Bag: A Comedy and Music Show
The variety show Mixed Bag is back to celebrate the opening of the new, improved Hugo House. Washington’s Poet Laureate Claudia Castro Luna will headline as the special guest, and poet Jeanine Walker and musician Steve Mauer will host.

My Favorite Murder
Murder might not seem to be a subject ripe for humor, but comics Georgia Hardstark and Karen Kilgariff somehow make in happen in My Favorite Murder, the blockbuster podcast the duo records in Hardstark’s living room. The show’s fans, called Murderinos, are devoted, and tickets to the live show sold out quickly. If, however, you find a spare ticket lying around—or, even better, a Murderino willing to take you under her wing (and it will be a her—this is a very female-dominated sport), go to this show and you’ll see how everyone’s worst nightmare gets a little less terrifying, and a little more fun, when you’re surrounded by the My Favorite Murder fam. KATIE HERZOG

Smut P(art)y
“Seattle’s sexiest interarts gang” will “deal a low blow to high art” in this variety show that celebrates all things smutty. The lineup includes slam poet Val Nigro, comedy duo Michael Castillo and Graham Downing, “dirty pop” duo Creature Hole, and many others.

Thriftease: Club-Kid Catwalk
Hot go-go queers will model pieces from Mona Real’s incredible thrift-store-alimented wardrobe, which you can buy straight off their willing bodies—bidding starts at a buck! The runway will just explode with alien fashions and vintage finds.

READINGS & TALKS

Finnegans Wake
Seattle composer, musician, and substitute teacher Neal Kosaly-Meyer will continue his amazing feat of reciting Finnegan’s Wake from memory, chapter by chapter—as if reading the modernist monster wasn’t hard enough. In praise of Kosaly-Meyer’s feat, Charles Mudede wrote: “Maybe this is the only way the novel could be saved. It’s not all that amazing to memorize something that everyone understands; it’s very impressive to memorize something understood by only one person, who has been in the grave for many years.”

The Value of a Work of Art Can Be Measured By the Harm Spoken of It: Conversations with David Shields
Distinguished intellectual David Shields will talk about his book War is Beautiful with Whitney Otto, author of How To Make an American Quilt.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

ART

The Vikings Begin
With no written history and its stories passed down orally through skalds (poets and storytellers), the history of Vikings has been pieced together mostly through artifacts. This traveling exhibition organized by scholars from Sweden’s Uppsala University brings together agricultural, warfare, and ornamental artifacts dating back as far as 750 AD. New research has uncovered that women played a larger role in Viking society as warriors and sorceresses. (One of the carved bone figure heads in the exhibition found in a female grave is thought to have topped a sorceress’s wand.) This exhibition will also dispel other myths about Vikings, namely that they weren’t all warriors and most of them had normal jobs as fishermen and farmers. KATIE KURTZ
Opening Saturday

SUNDAY

COMEDY

Carol Burnett: An Evening of Laughter and Reflection
In a 90-minute stage show, the living legend shows clips and takes questions from the audience. In Chicago, someone asked her about her relationship with Julie Andrews, and she told a story about trying to prank Andrews’s husband—the two women started kissing outside an elevator right as he was expected to walk out. Instead, the person who came out of the elevator was Lady Bird Johnson. “Aren’t you Carol Burnett?” the first lady asked. And Burnett answered: “Yes, and this is Mary Poppins.” CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

COMMUNITY

Lazy Daisy Vintage Market 2.0
The Clock-Out Lounge is hosting a vintage clothing and art market soundtracked by a soul music DJ with a build-your-own-mimosa and Bloody Mary bar! Buy clothes, cure your hangover, and shop local. Vendors this month will include Adria Garcia of Indian Summer Vintage, The Stranger‘s music calendar editor Kim Selling, Mona Real, Cordelia Funk, Flesh Vessel, Lilac Magic, and Tiny Thunder.

FOOD & DRINK

Seattle Restaurant Week
Frugal gourmands everywhere rejoice over this twice-yearly event, which lets diners tuck into prix-fixe menus at more than 165 different restaurants hoping to lure new customers with singularly slashed prices: Three courses cost a mere $33, and many restaurants also offer two-course lunches for $18. It’s an excellent opportunity to feast like a high roller at an accessible price point and cross some otherwise spendy establishments off your food bucket list, including critically acclaimed restaurants like Tilth, Agrodolce, and Lark. JULIANNE BELL

READINGS & TALKS

Killing Marías: A Staged Reading
Writers Donna Miscolta and Catalina Cantú will read poetry from Washington State Poet Laureate Claudia Castro Luna’s epic Killing Marías at this special staging, which will be scored by Trio Guadalevín and feature dance by Milvia Pacheco. Rich Smith has written of the collection, which addresses the murders of women in Juarez named María: “Luna’s lyrics champion feminine strength, challenge masculine violence, and offer some succor in a rough desert.”

March for Our Lives: Glimmer of Hope
The young Parkland shooting survivors and amazingly mature anti-gun-violence activists Alex Wind, David Hogg, and Jammal Lemy will speak about their efforts to build a movement and discuss their book Glimmer of Hope

The Moth Seattle GrandSLAM
Listeners of The Moth know the deal: each storyslammer has a short period of time to tell a compelling story, whether poignant, funny, tragic, or edifying. This night’s raconteurs are the top slammers from the previous 10 months, so they’re sure to be unmissable.

Surreal Storytelling with Strange Women #2
The second installment of the Surreal Storytelling with Strange Women reading series will feature weed-centric poetry and fiction writer Amanya Maloba (aka Kenya Ku$h), novelist and poet Erika Brumett, socio-environmental-focused poet Kat Kavanaugh, and Nica Selvaggio.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Michigan’s Stabenow and James clash in final Senate debate

Updated 5:41 pm EDT, Monday, October 15, 2018

DETROIT (AP) — Republican John James on Monday urged people to vote “for the person, not the party” and said he would both stand with and against President Donald Trump as necessary, while Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow touted her bipartisanship and said now is not the time to send a political rookie like her opponent to Washington.

The two met for a second, final debate just a day after clashing in their first one .

The third-term senator accused James, a combat veteran and executive in his family’s automotive supply chain business, of not providing “specific solutions” despite repeatedly criticizing her for problems such as the $21 trillion U.S. debt.

“Frankly, in these times, I believe this is a time for experience. This is not a time for inexperience when it is so difficult to be able to move through things and get thing done,” Stabenow told a crowd at the Detroit Economic Club, citing her work on policy like the recent funding authorization for a long-sought shipping lock on the waterway linking Lakes Huron and Superior.

She again noted James’ past statement that he was with Trump “2,000 percent,” and she said she helped oppose the president’s push to kill federal support for cleaning up the Great Lakes.

James said Stabenow has been in elective office for 43 years, has toed the party line and has watched the roads crumble, the Great Lakes deteriorate and Canadian trash continue to be shipped into Michigan.

“I’m an independent thinker,” he said, also calling himself a conservative and contending that Michigan needs “balance” in Washington instead of two Democratic senators. “I will work with the president when it benefits Michigan and I will stand up to the president when it benefits Michigan. Vote for the person, not the party. And do not judge me by the R by my name, but the content of my character.”

Stabenow has led comfortably in polls, but James — who would become the state’s first-ever black senator — is hoping for a late surge after starting to run TV ads this month and posting strong fundraising numbers.

In response to a question about the national debt, the candidates sparred over entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare.

Stabenow accused James of wanting to make the benefits subject to the “whims” of the annual budget process and said her 92-year-old mother is counting on them.

“It’s ongoing funding. It’s called mandatory funding. I absolutely reject the idea that that should be part of the yearly budget,” she said.

James countered that he wants to secure Social Security not only for today’s seniors, but younger generations.

“I’m looking forward to delivering and making sure that we have tough conversations and do the right thing the right way because the way we’re trending, we are going to find ourselves in another crisis, and that is unacceptable,” he said.

The candidates also were odds over Brett Kavanaugh’s appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court.

James echoed his previous statement that he would have voted to confirm Kavanaugh despite the sexual misconduct allegations against him, saying he will be a fair and impartial justice who has hired female clerks and, previously, two of the three African-American clerks who now work at the high court. He decried the “political wrangling” over his nomination.

“We just want a political system that works and won’t embarrass us. That’s a very low standard,” he said, saying he could bring people together as a senator because he did so in the military.

Stabenow, who voted against Kavanagh’s confirmation, said she first opposed him when he was nominated to a federal appellate court. She criticized James for taking just nine minutes to back Kavanaugh after Trump made the announcement.

She reiterated concerns that she expressed previously about Kavanaugh’s past decisions on health care and the environment. She also criticized his “out-of-the-mainstream” positions regarding presidential power — a reference to a dissenting ruling in which he suggested that a president could decline to enforce a statute regulating private individuals if the president deems it unconstitutional, even if a court determines it to be constitutional.

“We don’t have that in our country. They may have it in Syria and Russia and other parts of the world — not in America,” Stabenow said.

___

Follow David Eggert on Twitter at https://twitter.com/DavidEggert00 . His work can be found at https://apnews.com/search/David%20Eggert .

Haunted house in Orlando

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the character Barb appears in grand, gory style in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the character Barb appears in grand, gory style in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the Beyers’ home living room from the TV show Stranger Thing is recreated in this haunted house for Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, a monstrous Demogorgon seemingly around every corner is ready to scare you in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

No live Barb, many Demogorgons at Universal haunted house

By MIKE SCHNEIDER

Associated Press

Wednesday, October 10

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — There may be no “Justice for Barb” at Universal Orlando’s haunted house based on the Netflix hit, “Stranger Things,” but the beloved, ill-fated character does appear in grand, gory style.

The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights, the most haunted houses ever in 28 years of celebrating all things horror at the Orlando theme park resort. “Stranger Things” haunted houses also are at Halloween Horror Nights celebrations at Universal parks in Hollywood and Singapore, running from mid-September to the beginning of November.

Patrons walking through the “Stranger Things” haunted house follow the plot contours of the first season. There’s the shed where Will disappears, the Byers home where letters on the walls and Christmas lights help Joyce communicate with her missing son, the hellish Upside Down world, the lab where the malfeasance begins and even Eleven’s frozen waffles. Oh yeah, there’s a monstrous Demogorgon seemingly around every corner, ready to scare the bejesus out of you.

“Boom, a Demogorgon pops out and tries to get you. But he misses you so he tries to get you again over here,” said Patrick Braillard, creative development show director at Universal Orlando, walking recently through the haunted house — which is really a maze of rooms in a back-lot studio at the theme park resort.

Tongue firmly in check, he added, “There’s just one Demogorgon hunting you.”

Actually, there are multiple performers playing the looming monster at any given time in the house. Adult, female performers play the four Bar Mitzvah-aged-boy leads. Other performers play Nancy, Steve, Sheriff Hopper and Joyce. Different characters populate the house at different times of the night so patrons walking through it get different experiences.

Netflix and the show’s vendors worked with Universal to make sure the bed sheets and the wallpaper in the Byers house was the same as in the TV show.

And, of course, there’s Barb. Unfortunately for fans, Barb’s fate in the haunted house is no different than in the TV show.

“Hashtag, ‘Justice for Barb,’” Braillard said.

Follow Mike Schneider on Twitter at https://twitter.com/MikeSchneiderAP

The Conversation

Why is it fun to be frightened?

October 12, 2018

Visiting an extreme haunted house can be delightfully terrifying.

Author

Margee Kerr

Adjunct Professor of Sociology, University of Pittsburgh

Disclosure statement

Margee Kerr does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Partners

University of Pittsburgh provides funding as a member of The Conversation US.

A new installment of the ‘Halloween’ franchise brings the action forward to 2018.

John Carpenter’s iconic horror film “Halloween” celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. Few horror movies have achieved similar notoriety, and it’s credited with kicking off the steady stream of slasher flicks that followed.

Audiences flocked to theaters to witness the seemingly random murder and mayhem a masked man brought to a small suburban town, reminding them that picket fences and manicured lawns cannot protect us from the unjust, the unknown or the uncertainty that awaits us all in both life and death. The film offers no justice for the victims in the end, no rebalancing of good and evil.

Why, then, would anyone want to spend their time and money to watch such macabre scenes filled with depressing reminders of just how unfair and scary our world can be?

I’ve spent the past 10 years investigating just this question, finding the typical answer of “Because I like it! It’s fun!” incredibly unsatisfying. I’ve long been convinced there’s more to it than the “natural high” or adrenaline rush many describe – and indeed, the body does kick into “go” mode when you’re startled or scared, amping up not only adrenaline but a multitude of chemicals that ensure your body is fueled and ready to respond. This “fight or flight” response to threat has helped keep humans alive for millennia.

That still doesn’t explain why people would want to intentionally scare themselves, though. As a sociologist, I’ve kept asking “But, why?” After two years collecting data in a haunted attraction with my colleague Greg Siegle, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Pittsburgh, we’ve found the gains from thrills and chills can go further than the natural high.

Studying fear at a terrifying attraction

To capture in real time what makes fear fun, what motivates people to pay to be scared out of their skin and what they experience when engaging with this material, we needed to gather data in the field. In this case, that meant setting up a mobile lab in the basement of an extreme haunted attraction outside Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

This adults-only extreme attraction went beyond the typical startling lights and sounds and animated characters found in a family-friendly haunted house. Over the course of about 35 minutes, visitors experienced a series of intense scenarios where, in addition to unsettling characters and special effects, they were touched by the actors, restrained and exposed to electricity. It was not for the faint of heart.

For our study, we recruited 262 guests who had already purchased tickets. Before they entered the attraction, each completed a survey about their expectations and how they were feeling. We had them answer questions again about how they were feeling once they had gone through the attraction.

We also used mobile EEG technology to compare 100 participants’ brainwave activity as they sat through 15 minutes of various cognitive and emotional tasks before and after the attraction.

Guests reported significantly higher mood, and felt less anxious and tired, directly after their trip through the haunted attraction. The more terrifying the better: Feeling happy afterward was related to rating the experience as highly intense and scary. This set of volunteers also reported feeling that they’d challenged their personal fears and learned about themselves.

Analysis of the EEG data revealed widespread decreases in brain reactivity from before to after among those whose mood improved. In other words, highly intense and scary activities – at least in a controlled environment like this haunted attraction – may “shut down” the brain to an extent, and that in turn is associated with feeling better. Studies of those who practice mindfulness meditation have made a similar observation.

Coming out stronger on the other side

Together our findings suggest that going through an extreme haunted attraction provides gains similar to choosing to run a 5K race or tackling a difficult climbing wall. There’s a sense of uncertainty, physical exertion, a challenge to push yourself – and eventually achievement when it’s over and done with.

Fun-scary experiences could serve as an in-the-moment recalibration of what registers as stressful and even provide a kind of confidence boost. After watching a scary movie or going through a haunted attraction, maybe everything else seems like no big deal in comparison. You rationally understand that the actors in a haunted house aren’t real, but when you suspend your disbelief and allow yourself to become immersed in the experience, the fear certainly can feel real, as does the satisfaction and sense of accomplishment when you make it through. As I experienced myself after all kinds of scary adventures in Japan, Colombia and all over the U.S., confronting a horde of zombies can actually make you feel pretty invincible.

Movies like “Halloween” allow people to tackle the big, existential fears we all have, like why bad things happen without reason, through the protective frame of entertainment. Choosing to do fun, scary activities may also serve as a way to practice being scared, building greater self-knowledge and resilience, similar to rough-and-tumble play. It’s an opportunity to engage with fear on your own terms, in environments where you can push your boundaries, safely. Because you’re not in real danger, and thus not occupied with survival, you can choose to observe your reactions and how your body changes, gaining greater insight to yourself.

What it takes to be safely scared

While there are countless differences in the nature, content, intensity and overall quality of haunted attractions, horror movies and other forms of scary entertainment, they all share a few critical components that help pave the way for a fun scary time.

First and foremost, you have to make the choice to engage – don’t drag your best friend with you unless she is also on board. But do try to gather some friends when you’re ready. When you engage in activities with other people, even just watching a movie, your own emotional experience is intensified. Doing intense, exciting and thrilling things together can make them more fun and help create rewarding social bonds. Emotions can be contagious, so when you see your friend scream and laugh, you may feel compelled to do the same.

No matter the potential benefits, horror movies and scary entertainment are not for everyone, and that’s OK. While the fight-or-flight response is universal, there are important differences between individuals – for example, in genetic expressions, environment and personal history – that help explain why some loathe and others love thrills and chills.

Regardless of your taste (or distaste) for all things horror or thrill-related, an adventurous and curious mindset can benefit everyone. After all, we’re the descendants of those who were adventurous and curious enough to explore the new and novel, but also quick and smart enough to run or fight when danger appeared. This Halloween, maybe challenge yourself to at least one fun scary experience and prepare to unleash your inner superhero.

2 Comments

Joe Dirk

I used to love a good scare. Haunted houses and such just don’t do it for me anymore. I have camped in wilderness areas next to creepy old cemeteries in “banjo” counties, but that doesn’t even make me nervous these days. I still enjoy watching the movies, going to haunted attractions, and camping out in creepy places but it just isn’t the same as when I was younger. I can no longer suspend my beliefs. My enjoyment has been reduced to appreciating the technical work and the costumes.

Chris Crawford

Do you think that there’s a connection between the disjunctive experience of a joke and the disjunctive experience of a scary movie? In each case we are presented with experiences that lead us to an expectation, which is then shattered by the punchline or the failure of the experience to harm us. For that matter, is the work of M.C.Escher similar in its disjunctive effect? Our visual systems are led to a conclusion that is contradicted by the image. Again, is this disjunction the heart of the experience?

You might profit from reading Huizinga’s “Homo Ludens”, about the nature of play in human society. He discusses the role of safety in play. And of course, video games do much the same thing, placing the player in dangerous situations from which he can extricate himself.

Lastly, Mr. Dirk’s comment raises an important point: there appears to be an age-related factor at work with scary movies and with games. As an old fogey, I no longer take pleasure in scary movies, and games no longer hold my interest as they once did. Is the power of disjunction lost on those who have experienced the disjunction so many times that it has lost any disjunctive effect?

QUEEN TO RELEASE BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

ORIGINAL FILM SOUNDTRACK ON OCTOBER 19

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY, THE FILM,

RELEASES WORLD-WIDE NOVEMBER 2

THE 22-SONG ALBUM FEATURES PREVIOUSLY UNAVAILABLE QUEEN PERFORMANCES AT LIVE AID PLUS NEW VERSIONS OF QUEEN CLASSICS

SMILE REUNITES TO RE-RECORD SONG FOR SOUNDTRACK

Available on Virgin Universal /Hollywood Records (USA)

(September 5, 2018) For the first time ever audio tracks from Queen’s legendary performance at Live Aid are being released as part of the soundtrack album to Bohemian Rhapsody, 20th Century Fox and Regency Enterprises’ forthcoming feature film celebrating the band, their music and their extraordinary lead singer Freddie Mercury. Recorded at the historic Wembley concert in July 1985, these Live Aid songs are among the rare gems and unheard versions from the band’s rich catalogue.

Alongside the show-stopping Live Aid performances of “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Radio Ga Ga,” “Hammer To Fall” and “We Are The Champions,” the album features other rare live tracks spanning Queen’s entire career, new versions of old favorites, and a choice selection of the band’s finest studio recordings. Among them are some of Queen’s biggest hits, including eleven all-time greatest anthems that reached No. 1 around the world. The track listing was announced today, September 5, 2018, which would have been Freddie’s 72nd birthday.

Bohemian Rhapsody will have its world premiere in the UK on October 23 before opening across the globe in early November. It stars Rami Malek as Freddie, Gwilym Lee as Brian May, Ben Hardy as Roger Taylor, Joe Mazzello as John Deacon, and Lucy Boynton as Freddie’s lifelong companion Mary Austin. The soundtrack, featuring all-original Queen recordings and vocals, will be released on CD and digital formats on October 19.

The 22 songs on the soundtrack were produced by Brian May and Roger Taylor, with engineering and co-production by long-time Queen studio collaborators Justin Shirley-Smith, Kris Fredriksson and Joshua J Macrae, and mastering by Adam Ayan and Bob Ludwig.

The key task for the team behind the Bohemian Rhapsody soundtrack was sourcing the most suitable versions of the band’s songs, especially live performances, to fit the screenplay’s career-spanning narrative. Their brief was not merely to produce a greatest hits playlist package but a soundtrack album to stand on its own merits, underscoring key moments in the screenplay. May, Taylor, and their co-producers worked with the filmmakers to find the best versions of each track to heighten the dramatic power of each scene.

Ensuring that listeners are in no doubt they are listening to a soundtrack album, Brian came up with the inspired idea that Queen should record their own arrangement of the famous 20th Century Fox Fanfare. Featuring May’s famous multi-layered guitars and Roger Taylor’s distinctive percussion, this revamped track provides a suitably flamboyant opening fanfare to both film and album.

The five tracks from Queen’s 21-minute performance at Live Aid on July 13, 1985, have never been released in audio form before. They’ve only ever been featured on video as a special extra on the DVD/BluRay release of Queen Rock Montreal, which features the Montreal Forum shows of November 1981. The Live Aid audio is exclusive to this new soundtrack album.

Other tracks on the soundtrack have been sourced from different decades and even different continents. “Fat Bottomed Girls” comes from the 1979 Paris shows, part of the Jazz world tour, and has never been released before. “Now I’m Here” was recorded at the band’s 1975 Christmas Eve show at London’s Hammersmith Odeon. And the history making duet between Freddie and Brian on “Love of My Life” comes from the Rock in Rio festival of January 1985 when 300,000 Brazilians sang along. Previously this track was only available to fans on the video releases of this performance.

The three remaining songs on the soundtrack will be fresh to Queen fans, old and new. “We Will Rock You” starts out as the studio version, then seamlessly blends into a live performance with audience participation. This has been created especially for the film. “Don’t Stop Me Now” features Brian’s newly recorded guitar parts and is much closer to how the band plays the track live today.

“Doing All Right” was originally recorded by Smile, the predecessor band to Queen that featured Brian and Roger with vocalist Tim Staffell. When Tim later left, Roger and Brian would join forces with Freddie to form Queen. Freddie’s interpretation of the song is featured on the first Queen album. To recreate the original Smile version, Brian and Roger reunited with Staffell at Abbey Road Studios to re-record “Doing All Right” for the Bohemian Rhapsody soundtrack. This session which featured Roger, Tim and Brian all singing lead vocals took place almost 50 years after the original Smile recording.

With record sales estimated at 300 million and counting, Queen remain evergreen rock favorites whose glorious catalogue of songs continues to thrill fans of all ages across the globe. Despite the loss of Freddie in 1991, their following has continued to grow over the decades, boosted by a new wave of fans who first discovered the band’s music through their hugely successful stage show We Will Rock You or via hit TV shows like Glee, American Idol and The X-Factor.

The Bohemian Rhapsody film and its original soundtrack album are certain to introduce Queen to a new generation of listeners, and remind existing fans just how magnificent the band was in its prime. Queen remain spectacular performers today, both live and in the studio, their songs having comfortably stood the test of time. After almost 50 years together, Queen remain one of the most exciting and beloved bands in rock history.

Full track listing for Bohemian Rhapsody the original soundtrack is:

1. 20th Century Fox Theme 0:25

2. Somebody To Love 4:56

3. Doing All Right… revisited (Performed by Smile) 3:17

4. Keep Yourself Alive (Live At The Rainbow) 3:56

5. Killer Queen 2:59

6. Fat Bottomed Girls (Live In Paris) 4:38

7. Bohemian Rhapsody 5:55

8. Now I’m Here (Live At Hammersmith Odeon) 4:26

9. Crazy Little Thing Called Love 2:43

10. Love Of My Life (Rock In Rio) 4:29

11. We Will Rock You (Movie Mix) 2:09

12. Another One Bites The Dust 3:35

13. I Want To Break Free 3:43

14. Under Pressure (Performed by Queen & David Bowie) 4:04

15. Who Wants To Live Forever 5:15

16. Bohemian Rhapsody (Live Aid) 2:28

17. Radio Ga Ga (Live Aid) 4:06

18. Ay-Oh (Live Aid) 0:41

19. Hammer To Fall (Live Aid) 4:04

20. We Are The Champions (Live Aid) 3:57

21. Don’t Stop Me Now… revisited 3:38

22. The Show Must Go On 4:32

About Bohemian Rhapsody The Film:

Bohemian Rhapsody is a foot-stomping celebration of Queen, their music and their extraordinary lead singer Freddie Mercury. Freddie defied stereotypes and shattered convention to become one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. The film traces the meteoric rise of the band through their iconic songs and revolutionary sound.

Twentieth Century Fox and Regency Enterprises present a GK Films production “Bohemian Rhapsody”. Starring Rami Malek, Lucy Boynton, Gwilym Lee, Ben Hardy, Joe Mazzello, Aidan Gillen, Tom Hollander and Mike Myers. Executive Music Producers Brian May, Roger Taylor. Music Supervisor Becky Bentham. Co-Producer Richard Hewitt. Edited by John Ottman, ACE. Production Designer Aaron Haye. Director of Photography Newton Thomas Sigel, ASC. Executive Producers Arnon Milchan, Denis O’Sullivan, Justin Haythe, Dexter Fletcher, Jane Rosenthal. Produced by Graham King, Jim Beach. Story by Anthony McCarten and Peter Morgan. Screenplay by Anthony McCarten. Directed by Bryan Singer.

OZY Media Announces New Primetime Television Series, ‘Take on America’

Groundbreaking Town Hall Events Tackling America’s Most Pressing Issues Through the Lens of Race

Celebrity Guests Include Jemele Hill, Lawrence Gilliard Jr., Olivia Munn, Vanessa Carlton, Mayor Carmen Cruz, Elizabeth Vargas, Eddie Huang, Michelle Kwan, Harry Shum Jr, and MANY more.

Series premieres Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 8PM ET/ 7PM CT on PBS Stations, Facebook, YouTube, and OZY.com

Mountain View, CA – October 12, 2018 – OZY Media, the daily information source for important stories told nowhere else, today announced their fourth primetime television show, Take On America, a groundbreaking series of televised town halls confronting the country’s most pressing issues through the lens of race. The series premieres on Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 8PM ET/ 7PM CT on PBS Stations, Facebook, YouTube and OZY.com.

There will also be a special Take On America podcast, with editorial highlights and commentary from each episode available in iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts.

Hosted by Emmy-award winning journalist and OZY co-founder and CEO Carlos Watson, Take On America will uncover the different perspectives among groups who are often stereotyped for voting as a bloc, and reveal surprising views and diverse values.

Featuring a panel of celebrities and political leaders, each town hall will tackle critical political and cultural questions in front of a live studio audience comprised of one hundred people of each featured demographic group. The first four episodes will feature the voices of:

  • Black Men in Baltimore (Airing October 18, 2018)
  • White Women in Nashville (Airing October 25, 2018)
  • Latino Families in New York City (Airing November 1, 2018)
  • Asian-American Millennials in San Francisco (Airing November 8, 2018)

Each episode will provide an inside look into the daily conversations these communities are really having, helping to forge paths for progressive dialogue and forward movement as one nation in the lead-up to the midterms and beyond. The series aims to foster dialogue that unites American people, and fosters a greater insight and understanding at a critical time.

“I feel passionately that we are at a pivotal moment in our nation’s history,” said series host Carlos Watson. “We are living in one of the most racially charged eras since the Civil Rights Movement, and the world is simultaneously more connected technologically, and disconnected interpersonally, than it’s ever been before. We hope that Take on America will create a forum for substantive dialogue and ultimately inform and inspire action.”

The announcement of OZY’s fourth primetime television show, Take On America comes on the heels of a number of recent major announcements for the company. In August, OZY announced the creation of an in-house production studio, OZY Studios, doubling the size of their video team in order to drive the company’s rapid growth in TV and digital video series. OZY also recently signed with premiere Hollywood talent agency, United Talent Agency (UTA) to accelerate the company’s growth in television, podcasts, and live events.

Take On America is supported by the Charles Koch Foundation and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.

“Conversations that surface our differences take courage,” said Charles Koch Foundation director of free expression Sarah Ruger. “We’re proud to support OZY’s national townhall series as it invites communities to join the forward-looking dialogue that’s built on respect for each other’s dignity, instead of divisiveness.” The Foundation supports partners who are working to understand the roots of intolerance and finding creative ways to increase engagement across divides in areas such as criminal justice reform, free expression, foreign policy, economic opportunity and innovation.

About OZY Media

With 40 million monthly unique users and 4 million subscribers, OZY brings readers “the new and the next,” offering 100 percent original content with a focus on the future, via unique OZY News, OZY Magazine, OZY TV and OZY Events products. Called “the new media magnet for the news hungry” by Fortune magazine, OZY’s in-depth and high-quality journalism has attracted a number of high-profile media partners including The New York Times, NPR, PBS NewsHour, TED, The Financial Times, The Huffington Post and many more, as well as guest editors including Bill Gates, President Bill Clinton and Prime Minister Tony Blair.

Founded in 2013 by Emmy Award–winning journalist Carlos Watson and co-founder Samir Rao, the OZY team is based in Mountain View, California, and backed by leading Silicon Valley investors including Laurene Powell Jobs, Ron Conway, David Drummond, Larry Sonsini and Dan Rosensweig and a significant investment from publishing giant Axel Springer.

THE LINCOLN THEATRE’S “COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS” SERIES EXPLORES “RENAISSANCE MAGIC” NOVEMBER 1

The Harlem Renaissance was an intellectual, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, from approximately 1918 until the mid-1930s. Also known as the “New Negro Movement” at the time, this glorious rebirth of the African-American arts cast a cultural spell over the nation and the world. Two Columbus natives—jazz drummer Carl “Battleaxe” Kenny and jazz trumpeter Harry “Sweets” Edison—walked both the “Million Dollar Block” of Columbus’ Long Street and the heart of Harlem along Manhattan’s Lenox Avenue during this unprecedented groundswell of African-American artistic expression.

Facilitated by a local panel of speakers, this Community Conversations event will explore the “Renaissance Magic” experienced by these two native sons. The panel will include cultural historian Dr. Jack Marchbanks; Gamal Brown, owner of Onyx Dance Columbus; Michael Smith, Lecturer, Jazz Studies, The Ohio State University; Nannette Macijunes, Executive Director, Columbus Museum of Art; and Lincoln Theatre General Manager Suzan Bradford.

As part of Columbus’ “Harlem Renaissance 100—I, Too, Sing America” celebration, “Renaissance Magic” will be held at the Lincoln Theatre Cardinal Health Ballroom (769 E. Long St.) on Thursday, November 1. Doors open at 5:30pm. The program will begin at 6pm. Admission is free.

This program is made possible through the generous support of Donna and Larry James.

After the program, attendees are invited to the Lincoln Theatre’s main auditorium for a 20-minute sneak peek of the Lincoln Theatre Association’s upcoming, original musical theatre production, Renaissance MAGIC! Optional donations for the Lincoln Theatre Association will be collected at the preview performance.

The Lincoln Theatre Association presents RENAISSANCE MAGIC!

Saturday, November 3, 3 pm & 8 pm

Sunday, November 4, 3 pm

Lincoln Theatre (769 E. Long St.)

This original, locally produced work of musical theatre is set to the music of the intellectual, social, and artistic explosion of the early 1900s known as the Harlem Renaissance. Showcasing an all-local cast and creative team, this enchanting time-travel retrospective follows a family of performing artists living in the heyday of the Harlem Renaissance, and the youngest member who struggles to find her footing in the burgeoning arts scene because of her love of science and math. Tickets are $25, $30, and $50 (VIP) at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. VIP ticket includes admission to a pre-show parade and reception featuring cast members in era-appropriate costumes beginning one hour prior to each performance on Saturday, November 3, only.

www.LincolnTheatreColumbus.com

CALENDAR LISTING

The Lincoln Theatre Community Conversations Series presents RENAISSANCE MAGIC

Thursday, November 1, 6 pm

Lincoln Theatre Cardinal Health Ballroom (769 E. Long St.)

Two Columbus natives—jazz drummer Carl “Battleaxe” Kenny and jazz trumpeter Harry “Sweets” Edison—walked both the “Million Dollar Block” of Columbus’ Long Street and the heart of Harlem along Manhattan’s Lenox Avenue during this unprecedented groundswell of African-American artistic expression. Facilitated by a local panel of speakers, this event will explore the “Renaissance Magic” experienced by these two native sons. Doors open at 5:30pm. The event begins at 6pm. Admission is free. www.LincolnTheatreColumbus.com

Support for the Lincoln Theatre’s 2018-19 season is provided in part by the Greater Columbus Arts Council, the City of Columbus, Franklin County, Nationwide, and the Ohio Arts Council to encourage economic growth, educational excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans.

About the Lincoln Theatre

First opened in 1928, the Lincoln Theatre is a landmark in African-American and jazz history. After undergoing a $13.5 million renovation funded by a partnership of public and private support, the Lincoln reopened in May 2009 as a multi-use, state-of-the-art performing arts and education center serving the diversity of the central Ohio community. The Lincoln is a bustling hub of activity 365 days a year hosting performances, rehearsals, and classes in the performing arts, as well as a wide variety of community events such as film festivals, meetings, and receptions.

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the character Barb appears in grand, gory style in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the Beyers’ home living room from the TV show Stranger Thing is recreated in this haunted house for Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, a monstrous Demogorgon seemingly around every corner is ready to scare you in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)



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