‘The book is a portrait of my soul. Every word is true.’ — Emily Bernard reads from ‘Black Is the Body’ at Clemmons Family Farm

Photo by Scooter MacMillan
Emily Bernard author of ‘Black Is the Body’ and UVM professor of English and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies and Wanda Heading-Grant, UVM Vice President for Human Resources, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs discussing Bernard’s book with about 30 people at a reading at the Clemmons Family Farm in Charlotte.

SCOOTER MACMILLAN
Staff Reporter

The setting was perfect for Emily Bernard’s reading from her bestselling book “Black Is the Body: Stories from My Grandmother’s Time, My Mother’s Time and Mine.”

It wasn’t just the beautiful and historic Barn House on the Clemmons Family Farm with the late afternoon light streaming in from the Adirondack Mountains in the distance.

Nor was it the wonderful company that included Lydia and Jackson Clemmons, who cobbled together the charming and inviting home (now a museum and event center) from two barns – when he was in his 70s.

The perfection, served with an extra helping of wow, was due to hearing Bernard read from her moving collection of essays in the Barn House’s great room – where some of the book was written.

It was also perfect because after the Clemmons bought the farm in the 1960s and moved their family to Charlotte from Cleveland, Ohio, they’ve been inviting African American artists and scholars like Bernard to their home. The Clemmons not only wanted to share their heritage with their children, they wanted to share it with their neighbors in the whitest state in the country.

“I really believe that it’s a blessing for all of us to be sitting here,” said Wanda Heading – Grant, UVM Vice President for Human Resources, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs. The reading by Bernard was the third in a series of speakers moderated by Heading-Grant called “To Sing of Common Things: Making a Way Out of No Way,” being presented at the Clemmons Family Farm.

One of the selections Bernard read was from her essay “Going Home,” some of which was written in the great room where the group was gathered.

Photo by Scooter MacMillan
Author Emily Bernard, above, said that some of her book ‘Black Is the Body’ was written in the room where the reading took place at the Clemmons Family Farm on Sept. 14.

She said that writing in the Barn House helped “focus the tone of the essay … It felt like the right space to write that piece.”

“It’s about my grandmother and her mother and that space,” said Bernard. “I wanted the reader to sit and listen to the story.” And so we did.

“I come from a family of readers,” Bernard read. She recounts in the essay a story of visiting her aunt’s house in Hazelhurst, Miss. She was browsing her aunt’s bookshelves before a trip to a bookstore. Noting the quantity books, she realized: “There was always more room for books.”

Among the stories that the rapt audience heard were of Bernard’s experiences of motherhood. She is the adoptive mother of twin Ethiopian daughters. One of her daughters is reading “Black Is the Body” for school. Bernard said that, the day before the reading, her daughter told her, “I love your book. I’m loving it and to see you as a person.”

The collective “Awww,” of those gathered in the Clemmons Farm Barn resonated with a harmony rare and precious for anyone who has had or has been a child.

“My brown daughters became black when they were 6 years old,” Bernard wrote in one of the essays she read. “They were watching television one day in February, Black History Month. A commercial came on. It was more like a 30-second history lesson. A commemoration of a pilot, a poet or a politician – a ‘first black’ as a writer I know calls them.”

“‘See, we’re black,’ said Julia to Isabella.” Bernard recounted the ensuing conversation between her daughters. “’No, we’re brown,’ Isabella responded. ‘Yeah, but they call it black,’ Julia explained.”

Her daughters had learned “the absurd and illogical nature of American racial identity,” Bernard wrote. “Blackness, Julia had figured out, had nothing to do with actual skin color. Blackness, she had come to understand, was an external identity; external to her, anyway.”

Hearing this conversation Bernard said that her heart sank because her daughters were learning that blackness is “a social category, not a color but a condition.”

And they were learning that “being black meant that you had to be constantly aware, that you could never really be at ease.”

“The book is a portrait of my soul,” Bernard said. “Every word is true.”

Since the book’s publication, the author said she’s had so many “Forest Gumpian experiences.”

“The book did better than we all thought it would,” Bernard admitted. So well, in fact, that she was surprised when she went back for a reading in her hometown of Nashville to find that half of her high school class was there.

Her classmates, even some who were “good old boys” in high school, were so honest about how they realized that things they’d said and done were wrong and that they “were part of the problem,” Bernard said.

She talked about an essay that appeared in American Scholar called “Fired,” about the breakup of a friendship or “being dumped by a friend.”

“A gentleman wrote me and said, ‘With all due respect, if you had to choose between the essay and the friend, which would you chose?’ And I said, after some thinking, ‘The essay.’”

However, she didn’t include that essay in “Black Is the Body.”

“The book is a different spirit,” she said. “I did write that essay with some malice in my heart.”

Bernard said she “is on the page” as a vulnerable person. “I don’t believe in the hate writing,” but sometimes she has “to go there to know there.”

“This is a book that to me is reckoning with the maternal legacy and my place in that,” said Bernard.

Although she had expected the biggest readership would be women, she said she’s gotten letters from men who said, “Your grandmother is my grandmother.”

Since the publication of her book, making connections that Bernard didn’t anticipate has been an education and she said she’s learned that life is about relationships.

“I’ve met so many people that are beloved by people and that’s been incredible,” Bernard said.

The next speaker in the To Sing of Common Things: Making a Way Out of No Way series is Naima K. Wade reading from her book “Elbow Dreams: A Black Girl Growing Up in Vermont During The 1960’s,” 4-5:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 12.

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Constructing Jazz Inside Fine Art, And Vice-Versa

For many observers of modern jazz, pianist Jason Moran became a known entity 20 years ago, with the release of his debut album. For Adrienne Edwards, curator of performance at the Whitney Museum of American Art, his name first circulated more recently, as a kind of rumor.

“I have really good friends who are artists — whether it’s Adam Pendleton, or Julie Mehretu, or Kara Walker, or Ryan Trecartin and Lizzie Fitch — that were all saying, ‘I want to work with Jason,’ ” Edwards reflected this week. “And I kept going, ‘What is it about this musician doing things that are much broader than music? What is it about him that they are drawn to?’ “

The answers can be found, if not entirely resolved, somewhere in Jason Moran, a pathfinding exhibition that opens this Friday. It’s the first full show presented at the Whitney by Edwards, who originated it (with another curator, Danielle Jackson) last year at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. And, in addition to consolidating a large swath of Moran’s interdisciplinary work, the show highlights how his jazz skillset — not just with improvising, but also with nuances of alchemy and flow and surprise — have opened new possibilities for the artists in his orbit.

“Everyone had different reasons for seeking him,” Edwards says of those artists, “but the commonality was definitely aesthetic. Trying to get to a feeling of something that they knew, in their own work, they hadn’t fully gotten to yet.”

Moran, 44, grew up in an art-literate family in Houston, Tx., but he traces his current depth of engagement to two apprenticeships, with revered performance artist Joan Jonas and visionary conceptualist Adrian Piper. “You will hear me talk about Adrian Piper with as much vigor and respect as Wayne Shorter,” he said in a museum conference room on Tuesday. Responding to a question about when the chute fully opened to the art world, he looked back to 2006: “Making Artist in Residence for Blue Note, and putting Adrian and Joan on the record. That was me saying: ‘They are like Sam Rivers in my recording catalog. They are that important.’ “

Five years ago, Moran ended a long association with Blue Note, asserting ownership of his music while also signaling a shift in focus. He joined the roster of a gallery, Luhring Augustine. He also started his own label, Yes Records, breaking in its catalog with an album by his wife and collaborator, mezzo-soprano Alicia Hall Moran. (As a team, the Morans have created major concert programs and other projects — including BLEED, a performance residency at the 2012 Whitney Biennial.) Subsequent releases on Yes Records have included Music For Joan Jonas, a collection, and MASS {Howl, eon}, after a work made with Mehretu.

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Jason Moran maps some, but inevitably not all, of these past collaborations. Luanda-Kinshasa, a transfixing film by Stan Douglas, occupies a small gallery. A six-hour loop of hallucinatory realism starring Moran and a handful of other real-life improvisers as 1970s funk shamans, it was previously shown at the David Zwirner gallery, andpartially released on vinyl.

Other collaborations are represented in a video compilation, projected in a loop on three walls of the main gallery space. Unsurprisingly, this feed works best with pieces designed for such a medium — like “Chess,” a three-channel installation by Lorna Simpson in which Moran fills one mirrored frame while the artist inhabits the others, in cryptic costumes. Another standout is a harrowing Kara Walker shadow-puppet film, part of a series titled The Bureau of Refugees, whose power derives in part from a tensile score by Moran and Hall Moran.

The room housing these videos is also home to three sculptural set pieces from a project Moran calls STAGED, which most visitors will understand as the central feature of the show. Conceived as living remnants of mythical New York jazz venues, two of these hulking works — conjuring Harlem’s Savoy Ballroom in the swing era and The Three Deuces on 52nd Street at the height of bebop — were commissioned by Okwui Enwezor for the 2015 Venice Biennale.

In the illuminating museum catalog for Jason Moran, published by the Walker Art Center, Enwezor (who died earlier this year of cancer) notes that even in their vacant quietude, these pieces hum with tensions. “Moran’s constructions are like spirit catchers,” he writes, “meta-spaces where African American emancipatory struggles for political autonomy, social wholeness, and creative rebellion are evoked and memorialized.”

Those echoes of conflict are even more present in STAGED: Slugs’ Saloon, which was commissioned for the Walker show. Slugs’ was a rugged outpost in the far East Village, infamous in jazz lore as the spot where trumpeter Lee Morgan was murdered in 1972. That’s not a leading concern for Moran, who has an ongoing affiliation with saxophonist Charles Lloyd, another Slugs’ alum. Still, it’s hard not to read a trace of violence into the kicked-over chair at the center of the sculpture, beside a glowing but blank-faced Wurlitzer jukebox.

Moran says that with STAGED, he’s reaching beyond the disembodied sound of jazz recordings, considering other ways in which the music’s history has been encoded. “Though I think of these places as so remarkably documented through these records,” he says, “there’s still a gap in the conversation around them. And in museums, you make a thing to display it.”

For those who know jazz history, Moran’s three pieces also lob an implicit commentary on the shifting economies and social realities of the music — its movement from a popular entertainment to an underground art music, and in and out of black artistic control. The Savoy was a space for dancing, and a magnet for white fans venturing uptown. The Three Deuces packaged bebop for hip consumption. Slugs’ was a dive where transactions were often made off the books. That all of these bygone spaces are now being memorialized in a museum exhibition, with all the resources and cachet such a thing entails, is part of Moran’s critical calculus.

In addition to his assemblages, Moran has works on paper in the exhibition, mainly from a series titled Run. Made by taping scrolls across the piano keyboard, and then playing the instrument with charcoal or pigment on his fingertips, these pieces feel charged with kinetic intention. They’re reminiscent of the basketball drawings of David Hammons, and of text paintings by a frequent Moran collaborator, conceptualist Glenn Ligon. “In the glimpse of that front gallery wall,” says Edwards, “you see an entire arc of Jason as a draftsman. They’re these really beautiful private improvisations; it’s him, in his own space, which we don’t see.”

At a reception for Jason Moran on Tuesday night, the opposite was true: Moran was ubiquitous, greeting friends and admirers as he moved through the space. Then it was Go Time: along with bassist Tarus Mateen and drummer Nasheet Waits, his longtime partners in The Bandwagon, he stepped into the set of The Three Deuces and started into an exploratory performance.

Starting out with a group improvisation, they soon settled into “Refraction,” a piece Moran recorded in two versions on Artist in Residence, with and without Joan Jonas. The rustle and tumble of the band, which has become an identifying trait, sounded at home in the room. After moving into another theme, Waits took a drum solo — giving Moran and Mateen the chance to walk across the gallery, through the crowd, and take up new posts at Slugs’ Saloon.

The Whitney will see a lot more like this in the weeks to come, by way of a performance series titled “Jazz on a High Floor in the Afternoon,” after a remark made by Hammons. Slated to begin next Friday, Sept. 27, with a rare performance by saxophonist Archie Shepp, it will also include vocalist Fay Victor (Oct. 18-19), saxophonist Oliver Lake (Oct. 25-26) and pianist Joanne Brackeen (Nov. 22-23). Each artist will be free to utilize whichever space they like.

The Bandwagon will mark its 20th anniversary as part of the exhibition, with ticketed concerts on Dec. 19, 20, and 21. But before then, the trio will play its annual Thanksgiving-week engagement at The Village Vanguard, a room that has become as sacred and spiritually charged for Moran as any of the haunts in STAGED. That he’ll be working there during his exhibition seems fitting, as a reflection of the real-life work that his art evokes and cannily distorts.

Inside the Wurlitzer jukebox on the Slugs’ Saloon set, invisible to any observer and unmarked on the menu, there’s a 45-rpm record that Moran had made for the occasion. It’s a recording of audience banter between sets at The Village Vanguard, during one of his recent engagements.

“You won’t ever hear it,” he says. “It’s the audience in there just talking, with some music lightly playing in the background. So yes, there’s a record in there.” He laughs. “Someone I met told me there was a guy who used to whistle all of the solos on the jukebox at Slugs’. I don’t even know if that’s real. But that record is for him.”

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

‘No path is easy’: Black opera singers detail struggles

NEW YORK – More than 60 years after Marian Anderson broke the colour barrier at the Metropolitan Opera, black singers still face unique obstacles in building their careers within the industry.

“We’ve made some strides, but not a whole lot,” said Naomi Andre, a professor at the University of Michigan and author of the book “Black Opera.”

“I happen to know there’s an incredible network of black singers out there,” Andre said in an interview with The Associated Press. “… and yet they’re not getting the calls from the big houses and probably should be.”

At the Met this season, the company said there are 36 black singers on the roster, out of a total of 368. Of those, 27 are in the new production of the Gershwins’ “Porgy and Bess” that opens Monday.

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This image released by the Metropolitan Opera shows Latonia Moore as Serena, center left on stairs, and Frederick Ballentine as Sportin' Life in a scene from the Gershwins' "Porgy and Bess." (Ken Howard/Met Opera via AP)

This image released by the Metropolitan Opera shows Latonia Moore as Serena, center left on stairs, and Frederick Ballentine as Sportin’ Life in a scene from the Gershwins’ “Porgy and Bess.” (Ken Howard/Met Opera via AP)

NEW YORK – More than 60 years after Marian Anderson broke the colour barrier at the Metropolitan Opera, black singers still face unique obstacles in building their careers within the industry.

“We’ve made some strides, but not a whole lot,” said Naomi Andre, a professor at the University of Michigan and author of the book “Black Opera.”

“I happen to know there’s an incredible network of black singers out there,” Andre said in an interview with The Associated Press. “… and yet they’re not getting the calls from the big houses and probably should be.”

At the Met this season, the company said there are 36 black singers on the roster, out of a total of 368. Of those, 27 are in the new production of the Gershwins’ “Porgy and Bess” that opens Monday.

Peter Gelb, the Met’s general manager, said the company is “committed to increasing diversity on stage.” He added that the Met is “proud that today virtually all our leads in Porgy and Bess . are established Met stars,” who regularly appear at the house in a variety of other operas as well — a sign that the company has developed a strong lineup of black talent.

Still, “Porgy,” a tragic love story set in South Carolina’s Catfish Row, provides a rare opportunity for black artists because the Gershwin estate requires that they be cast in all the singing roles. The AP sat down with five of them during rehearsals to talk about challenges they’ve faced.

The five, along with the roles they’ll be performing, are soprano Latonia Moore (Serena); mezzo Tichina Vaughn (Lily, the same role she sang for her Met debut in 1990); tenor Frederick Ballentine (Sportin’ Life) and bass-baritones Eric Owens (Porgy) and Alfred Walker (Crown.) Here are edited excerpts from the conversation:

AP: How has being African American helped or hindered your career?

BALLENTINE: I have experienced a few times where people said, ‘I just don’t know if we could see you in that.’ Or ‘Are you sure you could play that, does that quite work?’ They’ll dance around it but not say the actual thing. I think me being African American at this opportune time has helped me significantly because . I’ve been at eight houses and I’m quite young. However, I don’t know if I could have made such a deal were it not for me being able to do Sportin’ Life. It thrust me into an international light earlier. But at the same time, it is a bit stifling. I don’t want to feel trapped.

MOORE: For me it was “Aida,” and that’s what I’ve done the bulk of my career, mostly because I’m black but maybe because I’m kind of appropriate for the role vocally. And I thank God for it because that’s what catapulted me.

BALLENTINE: They’re more accepting of black women … because black men in romantic roles will always be an issue. We can think of so many black women who performed all over the world: (Kathleen) Battle, Leontyne (Price), Jessye (Norman) ….

OWENS: From that era, I can only think of one man, and that’s George (Shirley), but they made George up so light that he almost looked white on stage …

WALKER: I did Orest (in Richard Strauss’s “Elektra”) in Germany (opposite a white soprano) … The woman that hired me, her husband was the designer, and he looked horrified when he saw me and I was like, ‘You knew I was black, right?’ So they did this thing. He got us to put this dust on our face. We still didn’t look alike. It was so silly and it didn’t work.

VAUGHN: For the most part, it’s hard to be specific unless somebody comes to you and says something, because our business is quite subjective, but I have been told sometimes that they don’t want a black person for that.

AP: Where do you stand on the issue of white singers darkening their skin for certain roles? The Met stopped using dark makeup for “Otello,” and white soprano Tamara Wilson protested against darkening her face for “Aida” in Verona, Italy.

MOORE: I’ve never had an issue with it personally. The only issue I’ve had is the Al Jolson look.

OWENS: That’s blackface, where you’re disparaging the person. When you look at “Otello” and “Aida,” someone is aspiring to be the leader or the princess of Ethiopia, I never had a problem with it. If they were trying to make fun of black people, that’s different.

MOORE: You have to be a chameleon. When I went to Japan for “Aida” they painted me darker. I said, “Why are you painting me darker?” and they were like, “We have Ethiopians in body suits and we want you all to be the same colour.” . And I said I’m with it. It looked great. I looked amazing, super dark.

BALLENTINE: I don’t understand the necessity of Aida being in blackface. Why? Are you going to go around and do it to the entire chorus? You can make the point easily with costumes.

VAUGHN: If I want to be Klytemnestra (Elektra’s mother), do I need to get in white face?

AP: What about the production by the Hungarian State Opera which violated terms of the Gershwin copyright and used white singers who claimed they “self-identified as African American?”

MOORE: It’s ridiculous what they did and they lied, but why shouldn’t they put on a production? They want to sing that music.

BALLENTINE: How are you going to feel when the copyright on “Porgy” runs out (in 2030) and it’s in the public domain and people want to do it in blackface?

WALKER: If I saw an all-white cast in “Porgy and Bess” I would be really offended. . How can you take the race out if it? Its all in the language. Would you set it in Catfish Row? I’m not going to buy a bunch of white people in this historic place.

AP: What advice would you offer young black singers trying for a career in opera?

VAUGHN: No path is easy for people of colour. Anywhere. Decades ago when I was young and wondering should I do this for real, a woman — she was white — told me: “You need to not think about what colour you are.” As soon as you start thinking about yourself as black, you invite obstacles.

WALKER: I kind of had to do that. I go to these foreign countries and I’m singing these roles and you’re the only black man in the room you look around, there’s no one else. . I just can’t have that as baggage.

OWENS: I tell young people, “Nobody ever got your job.” If it was your job, you’d have had the job. . Anytime I don’t get a job when I audition, I assume that it wasn’t about your colour, because if you go down that road it’s paralyzing and then there’s no self-examination about the artistry.

BALLENTINE: For every single one of us you see on stage, that’s another door that we have opened so that people behind us can follow. I think every time I do a role that’s not “Sportin’ Life,” I’m opening the door for some young black man behind me . because it’s really hard.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Global perspectives and community events

What does it mean to be global citizens? How can people in Minneapolis reach across divisions of race, geography, citizenship status and culture? Here are four events that help answer these questions.


Being Somali Panel Discussion

The Hennepin History Museum and Humans of Minneapolis team up for an event that takes stock of the challenges for Somali Americans living in the Twin Cities. Stephanie Glaros, the photographer behind Humans of Minneapolis, moderates a conversation with activist Saciido Shaie, founder of the interfaith Ummah project; medical professional Ecram Abde and community organizer Suud Olat. They’ll discuss ways to bridge cultural divides and foster understanding between Somalis and non-Somalis in the community.

When: 5 p.m.–7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 19

Where: Hennepin History Museum, 2303 3rd Ave. S.

Cost: Free, reservation requested at tinyurl.com/hhm-somali

Info: hennepinhistory.org


Jonathan Herrera Soto

Artist Talk: Jonathan Herrera Soto

Jonathan Herrera Soto will talk about his haunting exhibition at the Minneapolis Institute of Art’s MAEP gallery, called “In Between / Underneath (Entremedio / Por Debajo).” The powerful work highlights murdered and missing Mexican journalists, with their images etched on the floor.

When: 7 p.m.–8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 19

Where: Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2400 3rd Ave. S.

Cost: Free

Info: artsmia.org


Citizenship Series: Filling the Void

The Walker Art Center continues its series around immigration and citizenship, prompted by Carey Young’s interactive installation, “Declared Void II,” in the Walker’s “I Am You, You Are Too” exhibition. Artist Syed Hosain, writer and performer Rebecca Nichloson and interdisciplinary artist Safa Sarvestani are the latest artists chosen to use art to “fill the void” as they address issues of immigration, citizenship and nationalism. The show is followed by a discussion led by Michele Garnett McKenzie, from the Advocates for Human Rights, and Deepinder Mayell, from the James H. Binger Center for New Americans at the University of Minnesota Law School.

When: 6:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 19

Where: Walker Art Center, 725 Vineland Pl.

Cost: Free

Info: walkerart.org


Undersea Illusion by Pitaloosie Saila, 2012, Lithograph
Undersea Illusion by Pitaloosie Saila, 2012, Lithograph

Kinngait Studios

One of the best art exhibits of last year occurred when the Highpoint Center for Printmaking hosted Inuit artists from Kinngait Studios, a printmaking studio at the West Baffin Co-operative in Nunavut, Canada.
The imaginative, often surrealistic prints were clever and captivating, and Minneapolis is so lucky to have them back. Do not miss them this time around.

When: On view Sept. 30–Nov. 4

Where: Highpoint Center for Printmaking, 912 W. Lake St.

Cost: Free

Info: highpointprintmaking.org


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Kairos Live

Intergenerational Dance Hall

The Linden Hills-based organization Kairos Alive! is celebrating its 20-year anniversary by bringing a family-friendly event for all ages and abilities to the historic space above Wild Rumpus, a dance hall in the 1940s and 1950s and now a private home.

When: 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 20

Where: 3rd floor above Wild Rumpus, 2720 W. 43rd St.

Cost: Free

Infokairosalive.org/events


The King’s Fair

This year’s theme is “Celebrating Seward’s History,” and there will be music from local bands, offerings from local artists and crafters, activities for kids and food.

When: Noon–5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21

Where: Matthews Park, 2318 29th Ave. S.

Cost: Free

Infominneapolisparks.org


Avant Garden

Avant Garden 2019

Featuring legendary rapper MC Lyte, DJs Coco & Breezy and local band Ringing Bell, the Walker’s annual benefit offers gourmet food, craft cocktails, a premier art auction, live music and dancing.

When: 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21

Where: Walker Art Center

Cost: From $125 per person

Infowalkerart.org


If Your Walls Could Talk House History Workshop

House detective Kathy Kullberg will introduce you to tools and procedures for discovering the history of your house, including city directories, census records and building permits. This is a single class that meets twice, with time in between to research.

When: Noon–2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21 and Sept. 28

Where: Hennepin History Museum, 2303 3rd Ave. S.

Cost: $40; $30 for museum members

Infohennepinhistory.org


Open Streets Nicollet

At each Open Streets Minneapolis event, local businesses, artists, community groups and institutions come out into the street to play.

When: 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22

Where: Nicollet Avenue from West Lake Street to 46th Street West

Cost: Free

Infoopenstreetsmpls.org


CIDNA Fall Festival

The event will feature firefighters and a fire truck, face painting, a moon walk, refreshments and more.

When: 1 p.m.–4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22

Where: Park Siding Park, 3113 W. 28th St.

Cost: Free

Infominneapolisparks.org


Jonathan Wilson

Singer, songwriter, record producer and guitarist Jonathan Wilson’s grandiose 2013 rock album “Fanfare” features contributions from Graham Nash, David Crosby, Jackson Browne, Josh Tillman (aka Father John Misty) and more.

When: 9 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25

Where: Icehouse, 2528 Nicollet Ave. S.

Cost: $20

Infoicehousempls.com/events


Jamie Loftus & Sarah Sherman: Live from the Gutter

Spit Take Comedy Series brings a double feature of absurd and grotesque standup comedy from two of Vulture’s 2018 Comics to Watch.

When: 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28

Where: Bryant-Lake Bowl & Theater, 810 W. Lake St.

Cost: $18/$15 in advance

Infobryantlakebowl.com


The Washburn Games

Play rugby, soccer, lacrosse, cricket, karate, football, yoga and more at this noncompetitive sports sampler for children ages 4–12 and benefit Washburn Center for Children, a Twin Cities nonprofit providing children’s mental health care.

When: 1:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29

Where: Bryn Mawr Meadows Park, 601 Morgan Ave. S.

Cost: $15/$10 in advance

Infowashburngames.org


Trevino Mi Vida

Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965–1975

Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, this exhibit presents nearly 100 works concerning the Vietnam War and the concurrent rise of feminism and the Black Arts Movement.

When: Sept. 29–Jan. 5

Where: Minneapolis Institute of Art

Cost: $20/$16 for museum members

Infonew.artsmia.org


Screenagers

This documentary, for families of children ages 10 and older, offers an opportunity to hear about the benefits and challenges of living in this digital age, and to discuss how to manage our devices so we can live whole, healthy lives.

When: 6:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 30

Where: Mount Olivet Church, 5025 Knox Ave. S.

Cost: Free

Infobit.ly/MtOlivetScreenagers

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

How ‘Freestyle Love Supreme’ Brought Beatboxing and Rap to…

Freestyle Love Supreme co-creator Anthony Veneziale has a very specific goal in mind as he steps out on stage each night to perform the improv-driven show. “I’m looking for those ‘oxygen deprivation’ moments — where the audience has a gasp of air,” he says. “The more audience has those, ‘A-ha! moments,’ the more I know this is the direction that we need to go.”

A recent visit to the latest production, which is currently in preview on Broadway (it runs through January 5th, 2020), illustrated just how good he and the show’s other architects have become at eliciting that effect.

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After being ushered through the front doors of the Booth Theatre, you’re asked to put your phone in a Yondr pouch, where you won’t be able to fiddle with it for the next 85 minutes. That’s so you can listen closely to the performers and not be tempted to record the production, no matter how much you may wish to have proof of all the musical and verbal virtuosity on display.

Then, rather than remaining quiet and polite in a dark room with hundreds of other strangers, you’ll be urged to shout out things you dislike, things you love, even potentially share personal stories about regrets and what hijinks you got up to that day. For example, in a segment that offers a “Second Chance,” Veneziale tossed a soft “Catch Box” mic to an audience member, she then detailed a traumatic teenage flub (calling the cops on herself during a 10-day party at her parents’ home in Long Island). The team then reconstructed that moment in their own antic-filled way. Then they flipped it and reversed, recreating the scene again, but not making a crucial mistake, thus offering the audience member a new future.

In this way, the show is improv theater that manages to feel sophisticated and haphazard, hilarious and serious. And it’s something no one ever imagined would end up on Broadway when it was first conceived more than 15 years ago.

Freestyle Love Supreme was created by Veneziale with Lin-Manuel Miranda and director Thomas Kail and debuted in 2003. I first saw it a few years later in New York City at creative incubator Ars Nova, before Miranda and Kail would go on to work together on In the Heights and Hamilton. And it’s the success of that other hip-hop musical a block away that has obviously allowed them to bring Freestyle to this theater.

After years of touring and one-off performances, much of the crew remains the same, along with the addition of two women, all of whom have their own handles: Chris Sullivan (Shockwave), Andrew Bancroft (Jelly Donut), Utkarsh Ambudkar (UTK the Inc), Aneesa Folds (Young Nees), and Kaily Mullady (Kaiser Rözé). They’re backed up by the multi-talented keyboardists Arthur (“the Geniuses”) Lewis and Ian Weinberger.

A hit Off-Broadway production earlier this year proved that fans were willing to show up night after night to participate in what used to be relegated to theater-dork basement games. Much of that success can be attributed to Veneziale’s ability to whip the audience into a frenzy and have them participate in the alchemical process of transforming their words into mini-musical moments that will never exist again.

“I think of them like the Harlem Globetrotters,” says Kail of the crew of performers, likening directing Freestyle to coaching a basketball or soccer team. “They can take anything that comes at them. But it’s Anthony’s gift as an interlocutor; he’s a true master of ceremonies. I’ve never seen anybody better at engaging an audience.”

As the MC, Veneziale (Two-Touch) functions as the “cog” between the audience and the rest of the rotating cast of core members. He starts by letting everyone “see all the strings,” explaining how it will function, with the first sequences designed to let people participate at a slower pace — about 80 BPMs — before it ramps up. “People still don’t believe all this is being made up on the spot,” he says. “Afterward, I’ll still have people ask which parts were improvised and which were scripted. It’s the biggest compliment.”

Veneziale cites the Roots as a huge influence on the Freestyle crew as they take audiences through the history of hip-hop, but he says jazz plays just as big a role. (The show and group’s name is an homage to John Coltrane’s 1965 album, A Love Supreme.)

“It’s this concept of jazz and the concept of riffing,” he explains. “In some ways, we are using the English language as our instruments and we just happen to be playing that instrument with our voices opposed to the trumpet or the saxophone. But sometimes you may think, ‘Hey that was an R&B song — or an emo-pop song.’”

But it’s the later segment called “True,” after the crowd is warmed up, when things can get truly deep. Christopher Jackson (C-Jack) — one of the founding members, who will also be joining many of the performances as a special guest, along with Miranda (Lin-Man) , Daveed Diggs (Mr. Diggs), and James Monroe Igleheart (J-Soul) — says it’s his favorite part of each performance.

“Because even now I’m still learning things about the guys — every single time that we do it,” he explains. “You basically have 15 seconds to build a narrative around a word or phrase. And suddenly I’m having a memory of something that happened from my childhood that I had thought about in 25 years and I’m always learning about the others’ journeys, even after knowing some of them for so long.”

During the first preview performance on Friday, September 13th, Veneziale elicits a series of potential prompts from the audience but settles on “Equality for All” as the inspiration for the four performers to riff during “True.”

Arthur the Geniuses began crooning in his wonderful falsetto, setting up a moving R&B tune, while Shockwave tapped out a beat on an African drum. Young Nees rapped about growing up in Queens and searching for fairness and respect as a black woman. When it moved on to J-Soul (Igleheart), he surprised everyone by steering it away from a tale of misfortune, instead sharing a childhood story about playing with a friend’s Transformers and his own (inferior) GoBots and then feeling judged. “Equality for all … toys!” he proclaimed. Although the comic bit seemed to undermine the seriousness of the topic, it also reinforced how versatile the show’s format is, able to incorporate a story that many in the crowd could relate to and those microagressions that can inevitably scar a young person.

That left Jelly Donut as the last to take up the challenge by acknowledging the elephant in the room: what it means for a white boy to rap like this onstage. He challenged the perception that he’s appropriating a “black art” by giving a rapid-fire history lesson of the origins of hip-hop and its birth in the Bronx, citing Grandmaster Flash and DJ Kool Herc and many others. The audience erupted with supportive cheers. His rap felt honest and vulnerable, and he kept the crowd on the edge of their seats to see how he’d thread this difficult needle — acknowledging his debt to generations of African Americans for what their creativity and sacrifice gifted him — in an improvised moment that would have left others floundering.

This is the reason why people come back for Freestyle Love Supreme: to witness a fleeting moment of authenticity, to experience an ephemeral glimpse of honesty that can feel dangerous and nearly take your breath away.

“Each night it takes us to places that we didn’t know we were going to go,” Veneziale says. “These moments could be absolutely serious or profound or gut wrenchingly tearful or hilarious or embarrassing. The thing that’s most important is that we all say to each other: ‘Go for it. We’ve got your back. I can’t wait to hear how you attack this word this time.’”

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RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

‘You must be very careful’: Common questions about CBD health claims for pain and other conditions answered

Cannabidiol, or CBD oil, is promoted for a wide range of medical conditions. Recently, a review for doctors weighed the science behind the claims.

The Clinicians’ Guide to Cannabidiol and Hemp Oils was published earlier this month in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

CBD is a compound found in the cannabis plant. It is not intoxicating, Health Canada said.

As consumer interest in CDB grows ahead of the Oct. 17 legalization of cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals, here’s a primer to answer common questions about its health claims for seizures, pain and other conditions.

What is CBD approved to treat?

Epidiolex, a purified form of plant-based CBD, is the only CBD-related treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is used to treat severe forms of epilepsy. Epidiolex isn’t listed in Health Canada’s database of medications approved for use in this country.

What is CBD commonly used for?

There are anecdotal reports from users of CBD helping with certain types of pain, such as nerve-related back pain.

“Chronic pain management continues to challenge patients and physicians alike, and investigation into potential therapies such as CBD and hemp oils is a promising area for the future of clinical pain management for both pain relief as well as addiction management,” Dr. Karen Mauck, an internist at Mayo Clinic, and her co-authors wrote.

Dr. Hance Clarke, director of pain services at Toronto General Hospital who wasn’t involved in the research, said he starts by asking patients what symptoms they want to use CBD to treat.

It’s one of the first times in Canadian history where a medication has made it to the population without the science actually leading us there.– Dr. Hance Clarke, director of pain services at Toronto General Hospital

“The evidence has not caught up to the story that’s in the public,” Clarke said. “It’s tricky. It’s one of the first times in Canadian history where a medication has made it to the population without the science actually leading us there.”

The world is looking to Canada for answers on CBD, said Dr. Hance Clarke. (University Health Network)

Physicians need to work with patients to figure out what people are using, the levels in their body and what’s actually helped and what hasn’t.

“The world is looking to Canada over the next five to 10 years,” Clarke said. An evidence-based perspective on cannabis is needed rather than solely industry’s, he said.

Canada’s Arthritis Society said there’s limited clinical evidence so far on the relative benefits and risks of medical cannabis to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Dr. Gabriella Gobbi is a psychiatrist at McGill University’s faculty of medicine and the McGill University Health Centre.

CBD now is widely used by people for all kinds of disease, in particular anxiety, panic attack, bipolar disorder, depression. But we don’t know if CBD is really good for these kind of diseases.– Dr. Gabriella Gobbi

In January, her research into CBD’s effects on pain and anxiety in lab rats was published in the scientific journal Pain.

“CBD now is widely used by people for all kinds of disease, in particular anxiety, panic attack, bipolar disorder, depression,” Gobbi said. “But we don’t know if CBD is really good for these kind of diseases.”

Only clinical trials in humans can show if CBD is really effective for an illness, Gobbi said.

In Canada, pharmaceutical companies are sponsoring clinical trials to test CBD products in people.

How do you know what’s in the product?

Depending on what part of the plant is extracted, different components will be present in the oil, the Mayo Clinic authors said. Their list of what clinicians should look for include:

  • Manufacturing standards certification, such as pesticide or herbicide testing.
  • European Union, Australian or Canadian organic certification.
  • Lab testing to confirm cannabinoid levels and the absence of heavy metals.

“We see variations from batch to batch where patients are doing well on something, and potentially the next time they seek that same product, potentially they’re not seeing the same effects,” Clarke said.

A research letter published in 2017 in JAMA  found nearly 70 per cent of CBD extracts sold online were mislabelled.

“A lot of CBD oil can have very little or contain lots of THC [tetrahydracannabinol, the main psychoactive component in cannabis that gives users a high], so you must be very careful,” Gobbi said. “We need more quality control.”

What side effects have been reported?

In larger studies on CBD treatment for epileptic patients, it was associated with drowsiness, decreased appetite and diarrhea in up to 36 per cent of people, the Mayo Clinic authors said, adding the side effects were less severe and frequent compared with a conventional anticonvulsant medication.

CBD oil products can have very little of the active ingredient or contain a lot of THC, the main psychoactive component in cannabis that gives users a high. (Tijana Martin/The Canadian Press)

The FDA said its review of a marketing application for Epidiolex suggested potential for liver injury associated with CBD.

You can’t just self-treat.– Dr. Gabriella Gobbi

“You can’t just self-treat,” Gobbi said.

What about drug interactions?

The main drug interactions doctors and pharmacists look for are drugs, such as morphine, oxycodone, sleeping pills, antidepressants or antipsychotics, that already make you sleepy, confused or impair co-ordination.

“If you’re taking those medications to begin with and you use cannabis, we’d expect that those side effects would get worse,” said Kelly Grindrod of the University of Waterloo’s School of Pharmacy.

Doctors should look for lab testing to confirm cannabinoid levels when looking for products for patients, researchers say. (Guillaume Payen/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty)

People should talk to their physician, nurse or pharmacist to discuss potential drug interactions when determining whether to try CBD.

Maddie Brown, a registered practical nurse and cannabis consultant based in Ottawa, helps patients with medical cannabis prescriptions understand how CBD works and obtain it.

“I’m definitely most concerned about blood thinners,” Brown told CBC Radio’s White Coat, Black Art. “CBD can make Coumadin [a blood thinning medication] more potent.”

The general advice is to start low and go slow, especially if taking medications that are known to interact, Grindrod said.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Two (More) Dollars by Jamie Kirkpatrick

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You may recall that a couple of weeks ago, I told you about an encounter I had with a man sitting on a bench. He asked me for two dollars. I didn’t have any cash so we just talked pleasantly for several minutes before I had to move on. Later, when I went to select an image to accompany my article, I chose a painting entitled “Man on a Bench” by Horace Pippin, an African-American artist whose body of work was greatly influenced by the issues of slavery and segregation. Easy enough, but when I did a little additional research on Mr. Pippin, I found this image—a self portrait currently on display at the Barnes Museum in Philadelphia—among other examples of his work. That was when things got a little weird because this was undoubtedly the man I met on the bench. The only problem was that Horace Pippin died in 1946.

So now I find myself in the middle of a ghost story which is uncharted territory for me. I think I can believe in ghosts—restless souls still among us long after their mortal coil is gone—but I’m uncertain about the messages they bear. My encounter with this gentleman didn’t feel like a haunting and his presence was certainly corporal; I know because I patted his very solid shoulder. Moreover, he wasn’t cold as some people have described when they have encounter an apparition. I don’t even know what message Mr. Pippin had for me, other than to make me contemplate the existence of spirits, benign or otherwise. It’s a mystery.

Or maybe I can believe in something like a wrinkle in time when some oddity in the time-space continuum imposes a surprise sequence of events that falls outside our ordered understanding of reality. In his Theory of Relativity, Einstein proposed that matter can “bend” the fabric of space and time, making a shadow universe physically possible. I’ll be the first to admit that this falls way beyond my ken, but if time wrinkles are good enough for Professor Einstein, they’re good enough for me.

There is, of course, a third possibility. The man I met was not Mr. Pippin or his shade; he was just one of the legion of panhandlers who inhabit any big city and he happened to bear a passing resemblance to Mr. Pippin’s self-portrait. He needed two dollars to buy something unsavory, although I’m not sure much that is savory or unsavory can be purchased for two dollars these days. I assert that option here because it’s a plausible explanation for what occurred but I don’t really subscribe to that theory. It just didn’t feel like a shakedown. Plus, this was no mere “passing resemblance;” this was Horace Pippin’s self-portrait animated.

Anyway, since my initial meeting with Mr. Pippin (or perhaps his doppelgänger), I’ve returned several times to the site of that encounter hoping to reinitiate contact. So far, no luck. But I realize that since that day, I’ve been continually walking around with a third eye open on the off chance that Mr. Pippin is walking around looking for me because I failed to get his message the first time around. Do you think I’m crazy? I don’t, but then again, I’m biased. I assume sanity to be my starting point, but beyond that, all bets are off.

So let’s just imagine for a moment that I did encounter Horace Pippin (or his shade) on that bench two weeks ago and that there is some lesson still to be learned from the encounter. Maybe it has something to do with inflation. During the Great Depression, a displaced soul might have asked to borrow a dime, but today that dime certainly wouldn’t buy a cup of coffee. (Can a ghost even drink coffee?) Or was our conversation a manifestation of the possibility of connecting with someone from another time or world? That thought appeals to me; I would love to meet my seven-times-great grandfather who emigrated from Scotland back in the 18th Century, or, for that matter, any of my ancestors who could shed light on people and events that made me who I am today. I realize that sounds a bit egocentric, but whose shadow would you choose to encounter on a bench someday?

Think about it. Meanwhile, I’ll keep returning to the spot of my encounter with Horace Pippin. You just never know.

I’ll be right back.

Jamie Kirkpatrick is a writer and photographer with homes in Chestertown and Bethesda. His work has appeared in the Washington Post, the Baltimore Sun, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Washington College Alumni Magazine, and American Cowboy magazine. “A Place to Stand,” a book of photographs and essays about Landon School, was published by the Chester River Press in 2015.  A collection of his essays titled “Musing Right Along” was published in May 2017; a second volume of Musings entitled “I’ll Be Right Back” was released in June 2018.  Jamie’s website is www.musingjamie.com

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RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Fighting for honesty: Emma Shainwald ’20 seeks to preserve the truth as OA, activist and Fellowship recipient

COURTESY PHOTO / EMMA SHAINWALD
Shainwald ’20 hopes to start honest conversation through work as OA, activism.

While sauteed eggs and belonging don’t ordinarily go hand in hand, Emma Shainwald ’20 first found community at the College of William and Mary waiting in line for an omelette after an Asian American Student Initiative meeting. After four years of pursuing activism in Williamsburg, guiding new students as a three-time Orientation Aide, and working in a Shanghai art museum, Shainwald credits that fateful omelette encounter during her freshman year as a monumental step towards finding her home on campus.

“I was standing in line for an omelette and it was after our second meeting … and this senior girl comes up to me and she started talking to me, and I was like … ‘a senior wants to talk to me,’” Shainwald said.

“I was standing in line for an omelette and it was after our second meeting … and this senior girl comes up to me and she started talking to me, and I was like … ‘a senior wants to talk to me,’” Shainwald said.

Becoming close with upperclassmen during her first year was instrumental in developing Shainwald’s sense of belonging at the College. As a senior, she strives to foster that sense of belonging in other students through her various extracurricular and academic engagements. 

As an active member of AASI, Shainwald recalled how formative the organization’s circle discussions about Asian-American identity were when she was a freshman, and noted how influential the initiative was in cultivating her own community on campus. 

Shainwald said that last year, a large amount of students in the class of 2019 joined AASI during their final semester on campus only to discover how much they enjoyed the organization mere months before graduating. In finding community on campus, Shainwald took advantage of clubs, organizations and groups — and urges others to do the same before it’s too late.

“They always come, and they’re like, ‘I wish I had joined this organization my freshman year,’ and I was like … ‘you could have,’” Shainwald said.

“They always come, and they’re like, ‘I wish I had joined this organization my freshman year,’ and I was like … ‘you could have,’” Shainwald said.

During Shainwald’s time at the College, AASI has broadened its scope and membership, and now focuses on both discussion and political advocacy. Alongside other AASI members, Shainwald has participated in letter-writing campaigns and phone banks on behalf of several political themes, including opposition to the Trump administration’s deportations of Southeast Asians.

Shainwald’s engagement on campus extends beyond her political activism. A veteran OA with three orientation periods spent working in the Green and Gold Village and Monroe Hall, she has embraced three separate cohorts of students as they begin their college careers. Despite the job’s intense emotional and physical demands, Shainwald is proud to play a role in acclimating new students to the College, particularly when handling sensitive conversations surrounding sexual assault and diversity.

“We always have to prepare for that because you never know how your hall will react to those kinds of things,” Shainwald said. “There have been a few times where it’s difficult, but sometimes, it’s also really good.”

While orientation is designed to maximize student enthusiasm and help students feel comfortable in Williamsburg, Shainwald emphasizes to freshmen that college isn’t always easy. She says that acknowledging potential hazards along the winding transition to college is an effective way of mitigating the sugarcoating occasionally associated with the five-day program, and that having an earnest dialogue about potentially difficult experiences on campus is ultimately beneficial. 

“That’s one of the things we talk about … you always have to push that there are resources and people that are going to be there for you, and be really encouraging, but also … to be honest … these are things you may experience on campus and you want to do that in a way that’s not terrifying to freshmen,” Shainwald said.

In tackling obstacles in college, Shainwald tells her constituents that the best thing to do is to find a community like she was fortunate enough to have as a freshman, since having a strong support system is an integral aspect of a happy, healthy life on campus.

“I think finding a community is a really big one,” Shainwald said.

Last summer, Shainwald’s passion for community carried her thousands of miles away from Williamsburg to Shanghai, where she worked in an English language school and then in an art museum for six weeks. Shainwald was one of the inaugural recipients of the College’s Freeman Fellowship award, which grants stipends to around 20 students pursuing summer internships in East Asia. 

While teaching English was rewarding, Shainwald ultimately enjoyed working at the art museum significantly more because there was less pressure to exclusively speak English — and avoid speaking Mandarin — which she felt working at the language school. 

“The school was teaching English, so we could only speak in English, and I was like … ‘this isn’t what I wanted,’” Shainwald said.

Unlike art museums in the United States that feature countless gallery rooms, the art museum in Shanghai was considerably smaller and more intimate with just two exhibition rooms. During Shainwald’s time there, the primary exhibit featured a diverse array of work, including pieces by an African-American artist from the Bronx, New York. However, what Shainwald found even more exciting than the artwork was the ability to form friendships with her new co-workers and develop her Mandarin skills.

“I forced my co-workers to speak Mandarin with me … I can’t speak Chinese well, but please only speak to me in Chinese,” Shainwald said.

Buoyed by influential experiences in Shanghai, Williamsburg and beyond, Shainwald is beginning her final year at the College with an open mind. While attending law school, pursuing paralegal work, and working for a nonprofit are all on her radar, her main priority is to continue focusing on the issues she’s most passionate about, regardless of which professional environment she ends up in.

“I’m really interested in immigration and APIA issues… but who knows,” Shainwald said.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Contemporary artist returns to city

Keith Piper will be returning to Wolverhampton Art Gallery in October to showcase his new works in an exhibition entitled “Body Politics – Work from 1981 to 2007”.

The exhibition will bring together key works from the first three decades of his career, including some that have not been seen for over 20 years, such as the Trophies of Empire and Trade Winds.

The pieces displayed share the same starting point embedded in issues related to the ‘black body’, interlocked with the politics of the moment as well as examining various narrative strategies, including still and moving images, as well as written and spoken words and their evolution across three decades.

The exhibition, which will run from Thursday, October 10, to Sunday, December 1, is curated chronologically, exploring recurrent interests in the artist’s work and is spread across three gallery rooms.

Councillor Harman Banger, City of Wolverhampton Council Cabinet Member for City Economy, was pleased to see Keith return to Wolverhampton Art Gallery.

Keith brings three decades of his work to the art gallery

He said: “Keith Piper has had a long-standing career and has been a key player in the Black Art Movement and contemporary art.

“I am pleased to see that him and his art work will be returning to Wolverhampton to share his interest in history, the movement of people, the political angle, and introducing visitors to new technologies and how stories can be told through different art forms.

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‘The exhibition gives visitors the chance to immerse themselves in Keith Piper’s work.”

Keith, who first exhibited his work at the art gallery in 1981 in the ground-breaking exhibition Black Art an’ Done as a member of a group of young artists of African Caribbean descent based in the West Midlands, has tied his exhibition in with Black History Month.

The exhibition opens with a private viewing event on Wednesday, October 9, with an exhibition talk and tour with Keith available.

If you are interested in attending, go to art.gallery@wolverhampton.gov.uk

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

The 59 Best Things To Do in Seattle This Week: September 16-22, 2019

Ligia Lewis’s gory goth fairytale Water Will (in Melody) is the final act of a triptych from the Dominican American choreographer. Maria Baranova

Our music critics have already chosen the 44 best music shows this week, but now it’s our arts and culture critics’ turn to recommend the best events in their areas of expertise. Here are their picks in every genre—from the Local Sightings Film Festival to an evening with Eric Andre, and from Paula Vogel’s Tony Award–winning play Indecent to the Smoke Farm Symposium. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.