AfriCOBRA

With bright Kool-Aid colors (“Everyone was drinking Kool-Aid,” said the original member Barbara Jones-Hogu), political slogans and portraits of Duke Ellington and Malcolm X, the AfriCOBRA art movement was first founded in 1968 on the south side of Chicago by five artists who wanted to define a “black aesthetic”.

This month, the group is celebrating its 50th anniversary with a retrospective entitled AfriCOBRA: Now at the Kravets Wehby gallery in the Chelsea district of New York City.

“As civil rights activists and an integral part of the black power movement, this art group are still going strong,” said the gallerist Marc Wehby. “I wanted to show people: you’re not looking at a relic or a fossil, you’re looking at vibrant, influential artists who are still making work today.”

All 15 members will show their artworks and some will be featured again in the forthcoming Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power exhibition that opens at the Brooklyn Museum on 14 September. It features the works of 60 African American artists from 1963 to 1983.

The first show highlights the origins of the collective, which began in the home studio of Wadsworth and Jae Jarrell, two artists who wanted to build an African American art community among their friends.

Their 1969 manifesto, Ten in Search of a Nation, historically reshaped the mindset of black art communities. The founding member Jeff Donaldson wrote that the goal was “to preach positivity to the people” while combining geometric abstraction and realistic imagery.

Their artwork wasn’t just intended to illustrate their manifesto – it sought to breathe new life into the world. “We were aware of the negative experiences in our present and past, but we wanted to accentuate the positive mode of thought and action,” Jones-Hogu wrote in 2008. “It was specific and functional by expressing statements about our existence as black people.”

Barbara Jones-Hogu - Blackmen We Need You, 1970



Black Men We Need You, by Barbara Jones-Hogu, 1970. Photograph: Courtesy of Kravets Wehby Gallery

Rhythm is a core element of the art collective’s work, but so is celebration of style, color and life. “We are not addressing racial antagonism, which speaks to power,” said the AfriCOBRA artist Michael Harris. “We are speaking to people within the community, so rather than squeezing into the canon, we’re saying let’s expand the canon to include what we do and who we are.”

A few of the group’s members were part of Chicago’s Organization of Black American Culture, which helped create the famous 1967 community mural the Wall of Respect, a revolutionary political artwork of black liberation that paid tribute to 50 black heroes, including Martin Luther King Jr, Aretha Franklin and WEB Du Bois.

Even though these artists came together to help each other, many were ignored by the art world. “People were uncertain about buying an artist who was black and that had a political agenda,” said Wehby. “You’d never see their work at auction or at the Museum of Modern Art, only at the institutions that focused on African American artists.”

Jones-Hogu, who made empowering black imagery with graphic lettering, has a piece in the show that reads: “Black men, preserve our race. Leave white bitches alone.”

The group were rejected from the mainstream art community. “People were afraid,” said Wehby. “Images of black people with fists in the air was not favored – it was only in the past few years that people are realizing this is part of American art history, civil rights history and the black arts movement.”

The exhibition features a work by Nelson Stevens, a Brooklyn-born artist who joined the group in 1969 and is known for creating psychedelic portraits with a bright, Crayola-hued palette. It also features the works of James Phillips, who became a member of the group in 1973, showing his colorful geometric paintings, which are influenced by African patterns, the black arts movement and the Weusi artist collective in Harlem, which he was a part of.

Homage to Murry DePillars by James Phillips, 2010.



Homage to Murry DePillars by James Phillips, 2010. Photograph: Courtesy of Kravets/Wehby Gallery

The exhibition also features a work by one of the group’s youngest members, Kevin Cole, who makes musical references in his lyrical wall sculptures made from metal, wood, cloth and canvas. “When you look at AfriCOBRA, they were like the Black Panthers of the black arts movement,” Cole told the Guardian. “The movement is important because it paved the way for African American artists and it gave them a voice to speak about respect, family, social and political issues.”

The AfriCOBRA movement influenced artists like Kerry James Marshall, reportedly the highest paid living African American artist, who recently broke sales records at Sotheby’s, and Kehinde Wiley, who painted the presidential portrait of Barack Obama.

“The art world for black artists was small,” said Wehby. “It was only recently that people took notice that these artists are incredibly influential.”

But while the group has accomplished a lot since its founding in 1968, it still has work to do. “Mainly, we brought recognition to artist of color and provided mentorship to other artists,” said Cole. “We need more mentorship to artists of color.”

  • AfriCOBRA: Now is showing at the Kravets Wehby gallery in New York from 16 June until 17 August

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Saugerties’ Augusta Savage exhibit will be open through July

They say you can’t keep a good woman down. The same applies to Augusta Savage — you can’t keep a good exhibit closed. Lift Every Voice, an exhibit presented by the Saugerties Historical Society featuring seven sculptures created the Saugerties resident, civil rights activist and sculptor opened on Feb. 17 and will be on display until this August at the historic Kiersted House, 119 Main St.

Born in 1892, Savage was a resident of the hamlet Katsbaan from 1945 until shortly before her death in 1962. “Gus,” as she was known locally by her friends and neighbors, retired from the New York art world in 1945 and moved upstate. To support herself in her new surroundings, Savage raised chickens and pigeons that were sold in New York City and worked at the laboratory of Herman Knaust taking care of mice.

Knaust also kept her supplied with clay so that she could continue to create sculptures. Her subjects were the children who frequently came to visit her, as well as animals.  Savage accepted commissions when she could get them, one of which was a bust of the reclusive author and journalist Poultney Bigelow who resided in Malden-on-Hudson.

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Savage taught art to local children and spent some of her time writing children’s books and poetry to augment her income. She was also invited on occasion to give talks, one in particular about the Congo that she presented at the Atonement Lutheran Church in 1961. 

Before relocating to Saugerties, Savage led a trailblazing career — she was considered to be one of the leading artist of the Harlem Renaissance, an African-American literary and artistic movement during the early 20th century. During the Depression she lobbied the Works Projects Administration to help find work for young artists and was appointed as a director at the WPA’s Harlem Community Center.  

In 1929, she got a chance to study in Paris and while there traveled to other European countries. Upon returning to the U.S. in 1932 she established the Savage Studio of Arts and Crafts and became the first black artist to join the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors (now called the National Association of Women Artists). Savage was an active spokesperson for African-American artists and in 1935 was a principal organizer of the Harlem Artists Guild.  

In 1939, Savage was commissioned to create a sculpture for the New York World’s Fair.  Inspired by a poem “Lift Every Voice and Sing” by James Weldon Johnson she created The Harp. The sculpture was 16 feet tall and featured 12 singing African-American youths in graduated heights as the strings. The figure of a young man kneeling in front offered music in his hands. Although considered one of her major works, The Harp was destroyed at the end of the fair.

Lift Every Voice, the exhibit presented by the Saugerties Historical Society, is made possible through the generosity of the Baran family: Audrey Steenburn, Wesley Finger and Karen Johnson Myer to whom these sculptures were given by Savage. For operating hours and directions, visit the society’s website at www.saugertieshistoricalsociety.org or contact Marjorie Block, president of the Saugerties Historical Society at (845) 246-0784. l



RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

‘I can’t continue to do this forever’: Families with children aging out of care seek answers

Every day, the Canto family speeds closer towards a precipice.

Their son Matthew has severe cerebral palsy and requires 24-hour care, and at 18, the pediatric services that have kept him and his family going are slowly evaporating.

First to go, on his 18th birthday, was the respite funding from the Ontario government that helped Matthew’s mother Rose pay for extra help so that he could join the family on the occasional trip.

In two more years, it will be Matthew’s school, where he gets to hang out with classmates with similar disabilities and do favourite activities such as swimming.

“I’m at peace when he’s at school,” Rose said.

She’s worried about a future where Matthew could end up isolated at home, in the care of his aging parents.

“I’ve been looking around for day programs and there really are very few programs that can accommodate his needs. And if I do want to put him in a program I’ve got to hire a nurse,” said Rose. “It just becomes very, very expensive.”

“School is my saviour,” says Rose Canto, whose son Matthew has cerebral palsy. 1:48

The Cantos are far from alone. Across the country, stories are piling up as families anxiously watch their children with disabilities age out of care, graduating into a under-resourced system where programs are few and far between.  

In Newfoundland, a woman in her 60s fears getting sick because of what could happen to her developmentally delayed adult son.

In Manitoba, a group of people with disabilities who “aged out” and found themselves cut off from meaningful access to education and work filed a human rights complaint.

And in Nova Scotia, parents are so discouraged by the years-long wait times for community care spots for their adult children with disabilities that they have stopped putting their names on waitlists altogether.

It was one of those stories — from the Geddes family, in Toronto — that inspired CBC Radio’s White Coat, Black Art to bring together families and experts in town hall meeting called Crisis of Care: Help for Families and their High-Needs Kids as they Age out of the System.

Gilly Geddes, who has autism, will be out of school in two years. Her parents, Ian and Rachelle were told it could be a 20-year-wait for residential care. There are at least 12,000 other Ontarians also waiting for a space.

Fear, anxiety, dread

Like the Cantos, they fear for Gilly’s future, particularly as they themselves grow older.

“I think our fear is that there isn’t a clear plan,” Rachelle Geddes told White Coat‘s Dr. Brian Goldman. “We’re managing, we’re managing, we’re managing … and heaven forbid I get T-boned at an intersection or something.”

As Dr. Yona Lunsky explained, a sudden drop-off in resources and programming can have a devastating toll on people like Gilly and Matthew.

Lunsky is the director of the Azrieli Centre for Adult Neurodevelopmental Disabilities and Mental Health at Toronto’s Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).

Panel members Rose Canto, left, Yona Lunsky, middle, and Brendon Pooran, right. (Ruby Buiza/CBC)

“You’re isolated because you can’t leave your home, and you can’t be connecting with other people. You’re not doing something meaningful during the day, [and] you’ve lost the friends you are connecting with when you went to school,” Lunsky said.

It’s a transition that can set the stage for a mental health crisis, not only for the person being cared for, but for entire families.

“If you don’t have the supports and services you need, whether you have a disability or you’re a parent or a sibling… you’re feeling this anxiety and this dread perhaps about what’s going to happen,” she said.

Families versus the system

That dread – and a struggle that extends to an entire family – rings true for Don Andersen. His 16-year-old son Jamie, who has Phelan-McDermid Syndrome, is now living in a residential care home.

A social worker friend helped his family navigate what Andersen describes as “an opaque system with silos” to get his son a spot in residential care.   

“I don’t know how anybody gets through the system without a navigator,” he said.

It was a frequent refrain from experts and families alike: services are spread across multiple government ministries and communication between them is poor, leaving families confused about where to turn.  

Here’s what audience member Brian Cox had to say: 

There were many questions and comments from the town hall audience. Here’s what Brian had to say. 1:25

Concerned about where his 33-year-old disabled son Kapil would live after he was gone, audience member Surjit Sachdev created a non-profit that aims to co-house seniors and people with disabilities.

“You share meals, you share circumstances, you share your milestones…you live in an healthy safe environment ….[you’re] living a dignified life,” said Sachdev.

Financial planning for the future

Beyond advocating, what else can families do to ensure their adult children’s future?

Lawyer Brendon Pooran, who specializes in disability law and helps families plan for the future, suggests starting to plan while children are still young, looking into forming a microboard and establishing a savings account.

A microboard is a “group of family and friends that come together with an individual to form a small not-for-profit corporation.”

Wesley Magee-Saxton, flanked by his service dog Gypsy, recently made the successful transition to living in residence at York University. He described being able to do things others take for granted — like spontaneously joining some friends at a coffee shop — as life-changing for him. (Ruby Buiza/CBC)

The group works together to help the individual make decisions, and “the statistics show … they do facilitate a good life for people,” said Pooran.

His second suggestion is setting up a registered disability savings plan, “a fantastic long term savings plan designed for people with disabilities implemented by the federal government in 2008.”

Banding together for change

Though financial planning is always prudent, Mona Sidler-Hosios warns that newcomers and families without independent wealth can run into additional barriers.

Sidler-Hosios, who works as an occupational therapist at the Toronto District School Board, described the lack of resources for the students she works with who are aging out of care as “reprehensible.”

People shouldn’t have to struggle for care, says occupational therapist Mona Sidler-Hosios. 2:12

“The students that I work with … are at the bottom rung of the ladder. There isn’t enough publicity. There isn’t enough talk about it, and I think that’s part of what the problem is.”

She suggested parents band together to fight for their children. “Why do people who are truly in need have to struggle to get the disability tax benefit, have to struggle to get residential setting, have to struggle to get residential health services?” she asked as the crowd applauded.  

Another panel member, Wesley Magee-Saxton, also called on the audiences to raise their voices to help make change.

Magee-Saxton, who has cerebral palsy and uses a motorized wheelchair to get around, transitioned from high school to his first year of university, where he is studying acting.

Wesley Magee-Saxton, 18, talks about the impact of living in residence had on him. 1:56

“Two words: social media,” he told the audience. “Share your stories.… The more we post about it, the more it becomes recognized and the more people are pressured to do something about it.”

The need for a national strategy

For Pooran and panellist Dr. Jan Willem Gorter, director of the CanChild Research Centre at McMaster University, it’s a national strategy to approach the problem that’s most needed.  

“Trying to facilitate some sort of forum … between federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions is vital to solving these systemic issues,” suggested Pooran.

For Rose Canto, it’s timing that’s the imperative. 

She hopes that respite services and residential care improve sooner rather than later, for her family’s sake. 

“I’m getting older and I know I can’t continue to do this forever,” she said. “I need to make sure that my son will have a place to go.” 


Written by Kate McGillivray. White Coat, Black Art’s town hall was produced by Erin Pettit.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Kamasi Washington: The jazz superstar in interstellar overdrive

"As a musician, you sometimes have to deal with life's bigger issues," says Kamasi Washington.

SUPPLIED

“As a musician, you sometimes have to deal with life’s bigger issues,” says Kamasi Washington.

I was weightless, disembodied, floating through the stars.

Up, up and away I went, dodging asteroids, swooping past the moon, hurtling towards Saturn.

Below me, Earth was just a tiny blue globe.

Or at least, that’s how it felt.

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In truth, I was merely on the phone, having a cosmic chinwag with Kamasi Washington, the L.A. saxophonist some have called “the saviour of jazz”.

Huge, gentle, boundlessly intense, fond of getting about the place in woven skullcaps and African dashikis, his neck ringed with all manner of amulets and beads, Washington is, in the best possible sense of the term, a space cadet.

Kamasi Washington live on stage, doing what he does best.

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Kamasi Washington live on stage, doing what he does best.

“We all have the power to change the way this Earth operates and make our own Universe,” he tells me.

“As a musician, you have to deal with life’s bigger questions. The music industry tries to hold us back from that, because it’s not the sort of music that sells, but if an artist really goes deep, they come to the realisation that we’re all spiritual beings, and music is a spiritual experience.”

As with earlier African-American musical explorers such as Sun Ra, Alice Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders and George Clinton, Washington seeks to move beyond our earthly realm with his music.

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He’s interested in The Big Picture, you dig? I mean – why focus on the mundane, the terrestrial, the here and now?

Washington writes epic jazz concertos about the kind of utopia we might create if we all became more compassionate and enlightened, rather than settling for the status quo as careless and competitive parcels of blood, bone, anxiety and ego, hurtling through space on an overcrowded rock.

He is a horn-honking Afronaut, an astral traveller, a cartographer of the universal. His mind is in a permanent state of interstellar overdrive. He is unrepentantly cosmic, baby.

“My new record looks at our perceptions of reality,” he tells me in a soft Californian drawl.

“There’s two linked albums. The first one, Earth, is about how I experience things, and the second album, Heaven, is about how I imagine they could be. I’ve always believed that if we perceive things being a certain way, they become that way. The world that your mind lives in, lives in your mind, you know?”

A cynic might dismiss Washington’s world-view as just the flaky ramblings of a New Age hippie, but it’s more difficult to shrug off his records.

Because this man is a musical powerhouse. More than any other player of recent times, he has prompted a reassessment of the possibilities of jazz as a wild and lively contemporary art-form, rather than some dusty museum-friendly genre once loved by your grandparents.

Space is the place: L.A. jazz star, Kamasi Washington is looking to the stars on his ambitious new release.

Reiner Pfisterer

Space is the place: L.A. jazz star, Kamasi Washington is looking to the stars on his ambitious new release.

In 2015, Washington’s solo debut The Epic hit the shelves – a highly ambitious triple LP that connected the dots between R’n’B and folk music, funk and the blues, hard bop and cool jazz, African music and the European classical tradition.

Styles ranged from John Coltrane-inspired bebop to 70s jazz-fusion workouts a la Miles Davis/ Weather Report to Debussy covers backed by an orchestra and 20-voice choir.

All manner of breathless “saviour of jazz” hype started to appear in the music press, though Washington admits that jazz needed no such saviour.

There have been extraordinary jazz players beavering away on the margins of mainstream music for decades, despite limited financial rewards and shrinking audiences.

“All that ‘Saviour of Jazz’ stuff was just plain weird,” Washington told me soon after The Epic was released, passing through New Zealand to play the inaugural Auckland City Limits festival.

“I thought listeners would like that record, sure, but people treated it like it was some hugely important thing they’d been missing their whole lives!”

"It's flattering, but I ain't the saviour of jazz," says Kamasi Washington.

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“It’s flattering, but I ain’t the saviour of jazz,” says Kamasi Washington.

Really, Washington nudged a younger audience towards jazz via his long association with another predominantly African-American artform: hip hop.

He grew up in the tough gang-land area of Inglewood in L.A., a musical prodigy who “loved N.W.A. and Bach equally” and was mentored by his father Rickey, who played sax for The Temptations and Diana Ross.

Washington went on to tour and record with Snoop Dogg, Lauren Hill, Erykah Badu, Nas and Flying Lotus between jazz gigs, and contributed horn arrangements to key hip hop albums by Kendrick Lamar and Run The Jewels, among others.

“Well, I see no distinction between jazz and hip hop, really. All music is connected, and genres are just words people use for marketing. I mean, hip hop was built on samples of older funk, soul and jazz records. It is, quite literally, the same music! The way I see it, music is one tree, but with different branches and very deep roots.”

Kamasi Washington grew up "loving N.W.A. and Bach equally".

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Kamasi Washington grew up “loving N.W.A. and Bach equally”.

Washington is now in high demand worldwide. He played a sold-out show at Auckland’s Power Station in March, followed by a fiery performance at WOMAD in New Plymouth.

“I love doing those festival shows, man! People are often really searching for new sounds, and the fact that they don’t know they’re getting a jazz band is an advantage, really. Someone will walk past and it will just resonate for them, without them having to deal with the bad reputation jazz has as stale old music from your grandpa’s generation.”

He lets loose a big booming laugh. “They just stumble across you and experience your music from a really pure place. It’s always just me and my band tapping into whatever energy we’re feeling in that space and time, and people that are in that space and time with us, they vibe with it. It gets to them emotionally.”

To those with open minds and ears, Washington’s new record will have much the same affect. It is, shall we say, quite a trip.

As with The Epic, Heaven & Earth is a whirlwind of sounds, styles and ideas, all coalescing around Washington’s fast and fluid saxophone, the rhythmic backbone provided on many tracks by two drummers.

There are hell-for-leather free-jazz meltdowns alongside contemplative ballads. There are punchy “gangsta-funk” tracks and sinuous tropical workouts that might have been recorded at a Brazilian carnival.

There are mad semi-classical suites overlaid with gospel choirs, the singers making spooky wordless sounds like the Star Trek theme tune.

“Oh, that’s great! My mum was a huge Trekkie, and I grew up watching a lot of sci-fi TV. But yeah, I guess those big choirs have become a trademark of mine. When I first started out, I would play at my uncle’s church alongside the choir, and to me, the human voice is the original instrument. There’s a real power to it, so whenever I’m really trying to energise something, that’s the sound that comes into my head.”

"We can use our lives to benefit the world, rather than diminish it."

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“We can use our lives to benefit the world, rather than diminish it.”

Perhaps inevitably, the album also contains tracks with righteous rocket-man titles such as Vi Lua Vi Sol (The Sun and The Moon) and The Space Traveller’s Lullaby.

“I wrote Vi Lua Vi Sol after this festival in Brazil. We were sitting outside at the after-party, just chillin’, and there was this girl who was just, you know… talking to the moon! It was full-on, man! It took me to this imaginary place where people addressed the planets directly, like talking to the universe, so I wrote about that.”

The Space Traveller’s Lullaby, meanwhile, is a companion piece to a track called Fists Of Fury, inspired by the old Bruce Lee kung fu flick.

“For me, that movie encapsulates the idea that to live is to struggle, but it also makes the point that you do have power over your circumstances. So Fists Of Fury is about the eternal struggle that is life, and Space Traveller’s Lullaby is about the endless potential that is life. It’s about relishing your struggle, because that struggle helps you realise your potential.”

I have to admit, I have a few issues with all this “attract your own reality” palaver. While intended to be inspirational and life-affirming, it can also be a way of blaming people for the crappy situations they find themselves in.

"I love to play festival shows..." he says.

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“I love to play festival shows…” he says.

Yes, I understand that Washington is inspired by the “spiritual jazz” movement of the late 60s and 70s, a time when many musicians were pondering notions of freedom and self-determination and suggesting that we all shared some sort of cosmic consciousness.

And like a lot of other thoughtful people raised in tough areas, he learned to look beyond his immediate surroundings and visualise a better world.

Fair enough. But in the meantime, our earthy reality is not flash. Out in the real world, it’s been a very strange few years, with many people’s lives defined by increasing levels of fear, anxiety, political instability and natural disasters.

Surely Washington isn’t suggesting we’ve brought all this on ourselves?

“It’s complicated, right? I’m not pretending to have all the answers. But I strongly believe that the world becomes what we want it to be. I might have a sensation of being powerless, and that the world is a dark, harsh, hard place. But then I zoom in, and I think about some of the people I’ve met and experiences I’ve had in this world of ours, and it seems like a really beautiful, exciting and supportive sort of place.”

"My mum was a huge Trekkie, and I grew up watching a lot of sci-fi TV," Kamasi Washington says of his influences.

Supplied

“My mum was a huge Trekkie, and I grew up watching a lot of sci-fi TV,” Kamasi Washington says of his influences.

There are, he reckons, far more people on our shared planet working towards positive change than there are negative and destructive people.

“Even people who seem very powerful actually aren’t; we give them that power over us, and we can take it away again. We have the power to change things. We just have to make sure the people and places within our reach are affected by our positivity, and we’ll all be making the world come a little closer to that ideal.”

This is why Washington makes music, he says – to help bring about such a change.

“There’s a deeper wisdom that your spirit has that your conscious mind’s often still trying to catch up to. Music helps you get there somehow by tapping into your unconscious, both as a player and as a listener. Music nurtures the emotional and imaginative lives of people. It explores possible futures through sound.”

Not that he sees himself as being particularly special. Washington believes everyone can help promote positive change, not just musicians.

“Musicians might reach a lot of people, but you can also make the world a better place by being a thoughtful and compassionate mechanic or architect or teacher or parent, or a really great neighbour or friend or cousin or aunt. Whatever you do, you can put your skills and your energy towards making the world a better place, and bit by bit, we can make it happen. We can use our lives to benefit the world, rather than diminish it.”

Kamasi Washington's new album, Heaven & Earth, is a whirlwind of sounds, styles and ideas.

Supplied

Kamasi Washington’s new album, Heaven & Earth, is a whirlwind of sounds, styles and ideas.

Washington’s latest contribution to this struggle is the Heaven & Earth record, and he also tries to nudge things in a more positive direction with every live show.

“With a good live show, you might not know the people either side of you, but when it’s over, you feel like you all went on a profound emotional journey together. I want my records to do that too. I’m really hoping people get a sense of empowerment from this music, you know?

“Like you say, this world can seem like a pretty cold place, and there’s this feeling that it’s beyond our influence as individuals. But really, our world’s just a collection of billions of smaller worlds that are our individual lives. If we make our own world better, we make a difference. I hope this music might help bring people’s worlds together a bit more, so they feel more of a sense of connection and mutual support. It’s a big high aim, I know, but why aim low?”

Kamasi Washington’s Heaven & Earth is released on June 22

 – Stuff

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Families with children aging out of care seek answers

Every day, the Canto family speeds closer towards a precipice.

Their son Matthew has severe cerebral palsy and requires 24-hour care, and at 18, the pediatric services that have kept him and his family going are slowly evaporating.

First to go, on his 18th birthday, was the respite funding from the Ontario government that helped Matthew’s mother Rose pay for extra help so that he could join the family on the occasional trip.

In two more years, it will be Matthew’s school, where he gets to hang out with classmates with similar disabilities and do favourite activities such as swimming.

“I’m at peace when he’s at school,” Rose said.

She’s worried about a future where Matthew could end up isolated at home, in the care of his aging parents.

“I’ve been looking around for day programs and there really are very few programs that can accommodate his needs. And if I do want to put him in a program I’ve got to hire a nurse,” said Rose. “It just becomes very, very expensive.”

“School is my saviour,” says Rose Canto, whose son Matthew has cerebral palsy. 1:48

The Cantos are far from alone. Across the country, stories are piling up as families anxiously watch their children with disabilities age out of care, graduating into a under-resourced system where programs are few and far between.  

In Newfoundland, a woman in her 60s fears getting sick because of what could happen to her developmentally delayed adult son.

In Manitoba, a group of people with disabilities who “aged out” and found themselves cut off from meaningful access to education and work filed a human rights complaint.

And in Nova Scotia, parents are so discouraged by the years-long wait times for community care spots for their adult children with disabilities that they have stopped putting their names on waitlists altogether.

It was one of those stories — from the Geddes family, in Toronto — that inspired CBC Radio’s White Coat, Black Art to bring together families and experts in town hall meeting called Crisis of Care: Help for Families and their High-Needs Kids as they Age out of the System.

Gilly Geddes, who has autism, will be out of school in two years. Her parents, Ian and Rachelle were told it could be a 20-year-wait for residential care. There are at least 12,000 other Ontarians also waiting for a space.

Fear, anxiety, dread

Like the Cantos, they fear for Gilly’s future, particularly as they themselves grow older.

“I think our fear is that there isn’t a clear plan,” Rachelle Geddes told White Coat‘s Dr. Brian Goldman. “We’re managing, we’re managing, we’re managing … and heaven forbid I get T-boned at an intersection or something.”

As Dr. Yona Lunsky explained, a sudden drop-off in resources and programming can have a devastating toll on people like Gilly and Matthew.

Lunsky is the director of the Azrieli Centre for Adult Neurodevelopmental Disabilities and Mental Health at Toronto’s Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).

Panel members Rose Canto, left, Yona Lunsky, middle, and Brendon Pooran, right. (Ruby Buiza/CBC)

“You’re isolated because you can’t leave your home, and you can’t be connecting with other people. You’re not doing something meaningful during the day, [and] you’ve lost the friends you are connecting with when you went to school,” Lunsky said.

It’s a transition that can set the stage for a mental health crisis, not only for the person being cared for, but for entire families.

“If you don’t have the supports and services you need, whether you have a disability or you’re a parent or a sibling… you’re feeling this anxiety and this dread perhaps about what’s going to happen,” she said.

Families versus the system

That dread – and a struggle that extends to an entire family – rings true for Don Andersen. His 16-year-old son Jamie, who has Phelan-McDermid Syndrome, is now living in a residential care home.

A social worker friend helped his family navigate what Andersen describes as “an opaque system with silos” to get his son a spot in residential care.   

“I don’t know how anybody gets through the system without a navigator,” he said.

It was a frequent refrain from experts and families alike: services are spread across multiple government ministries and communication between them is poor, leaving families confused about where to turn.  

Here’s what audience member Brian Cox had to say: 

There were many questions and comments from the town hall audience. Here’s what Brian had to say. 1:25

Concerned about where his 33-year-old disabled son Kapil would live after he was gone, audience member Surjit Sachdev created a non-profit that aims to co-house seniors and people with disabilities.

“You share meals, you share circumstances, you share your milestones…you live in an healthy safe environment ….[you’re] living a dignified life,” said Sachdev.

Financial planning for the future

Beyond advocating, what else can families do to ensure their adult children’s future?

Lawyer Brendon Pooran, who specializes in disability law and helps families plan for the future, suggests starting to plan while children are still young, looking into forming a microboard and establishing a savings account.

A microboard is a “group of family and friends that come together with an individual to form a small not-for-profit corporation.”

Wesley Magee-Saxton, flanked by his service dog Gypsy, recently made the successful transition to living in residence at York University. He described being able to do things others take for granted — like spontaneously joining some friends at a coffee shop — as life-changing for him. (Ruby Buiza/CBC)

The group works together to help the individual make decisions, and “the statistics show … they do facilitate a good life for people,” said Pooran.

His second suggestion is setting up a registered disability savings plan, “a fantastic long term savings plan designed for people with disabilities implemented by the federal government in 2008.”

Banding together for change

Though financial planning is always prudent, Mona Sidler-Hosios warns that newcomers and families without independent wealth can run into additional barriers.

Sidler-Hosios, who works as an occupational therapist at the Toronto District School Board, described the lack of resources for the students she works with who are aging out of care as “reprehensible.”

People shouldn’t have to struggle for care, says occupational therapist Mona Sidler-Hosios. 2:12

“The students that I work with … are at the bottom rung of the ladder. There isn’t enough publicity. There isn’t enough talk about it, and I think that’s part of what the problem is.”

She suggested parents band together to fight for their children. “Why do people who are truly in need have to struggle to get the disability tax benefit, have to struggle to get residential setting, have to struggle to get residential health services?” she asked as the crowd applauded.  

Another panel member, Wesley Magee-Saxton, also called on the audiences to raise their voices to help make change.

Magee-Saxton, who has cerebral palsy and uses a motorized wheelchair to get around, transitioned from high school to his first year of university, where he is studying acting.

Wesley Magee-Saxton, 18, talks about the impact of living in residence had on him. 1:56

“Two words: social media,” he told the audience. “Share your stories.… The more we post about it, the more it becomes recognized and the more people are pressured to do something about it.”

The need for a national strategy

For Pooran and panellist Dr. Jan Willem Gorter, director of the CanChild Research Centre at McMaster University, it’s a national strategy to approach the problem that’s most needed.  

“Trying to facilitate some sort of forum … between federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions is vital to solving these systemic issues,” suggested Pooran.

For Rose Canto, it’s timing that’s the imperative. 

She hopes that respite services and residential care improve sooner rather than later, for her family’s sake. 

“I’m getting older and I know I can’t continue to do this forever,” she said. “I need to make sure that my son will have a place to go.” 


Written by Kate McGillivray. White Coat, Black Art’s town hall was produced by Erin Pettit.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

5 Perspective Will ‘Ain’t Too Proud’ be better than other jukebox musicals?


HANDOUT IMAGE: The cast of “Ain’t Too Proud – The Life and Times of The Temptations” at Berkeley Repertory Theatre. Photo by Kevin Berne. (Kevin Berne/Kevin Berne)

NEW YORK — In the course of figuring out her approach to the story of the Temptations, playwright Dominique Morisseau sat down one day in Los Angeles with Otis Williams, the only surviving original member of the group. Her goal: to get him to spill the beans.

“So I asked Otis, in as nonconfrontational a way as possible,” she recalled, “ ‘Is there a perspective now that you have that you didn’t have before?’ ”

“You mean, regrets?” Williams replied. 

And then, Morisseau remembered, “He stops talking. He gets emotional. And all I can think is, ‘Oh, if I make Otis Williams cry, my parents will never forgive me!’ ”

Cry, Otis, cry! Of such encounters are biographical musicals sometimes made. And if they excavate some nuggets of bona fide candor, then the resulting musical might, just might, have the potential to become more than a greatest-hits hagiography of beloved figures from the recording industry. This more artful mission is the one the creative team had in mind as they put together “Ain’t Too Proud: The Life and Times of the Temptations,” an anthology show built around one of the most influential groups in Motown, not to mention rock-and-roll, history.

After a well-received trial run last year at the Bay Area’s Berkeley Rep, “Ain’t Too Proud” continues its long march toward Broadway with what its producers describe as a crucial month-long visit to the Kennedy Center, with performances starting Tuesday  and an official opening night set for June 28, when reviews will appear. Additional stops are scheduled for Los Angeles and Toronto, as the show both awaits word on a suitable space among the 41 theaters of Broadway, where availability is tight, and takes advantage of the time to make adjustments to the show.


The cast of “Ain’t Too Proud – The Life and Times of The Temptations.” (litwin)

Des McAnuff, who won his first Tony 25 year ago for his direction of “The Who’s Tommy” — one of the first musicals to develop a rock-group album into a stage story — says shaping the music of the Temptations for the theater has been relatively easy. “Happily, the themes that affected their lives are very much alive in the songs they sing,” McAnuff said by phone from Bloomington, Ind., where “Ain’t Too Proud” stopped for several days for technical refinements. “The harmonies and certainly the electrifying music they were generating, and is still with us, have become classics.”

That an assembly line has formed to manufacture popular rock songbooks into jukebox shows doesn’t necessarily mean the road to Broadway success is a breeze. Entries in the genre, such as the Tony-winning “Jersey Boys,” based on Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons; the Abba-inspired “Mamma Mia!”; and “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical” can make theatergoers forget how many others have crashed and burned. Anyone recall “Ring of Fire,” the Johnny Cash musical that lasted a month on Broadway in winter 2006? Or “The Times They Are A-Changin’,” a two-month wonder featuring the songs of Bob Dylan? Or, for that matter, this past season’s flop, “Escape to Margaritaville,” with the songs of Jimmy Buffett and a life span ending July 1, foreshortened by anemic ticket sales?

To stave off the shopworn and infuse the project with as much authenticity as possible, lead producers Tom Hulce and Ira Pittelman, of “Spring Awakening” and “American Idiot,” among others, recruited Morisseau. Her highly praised plays on hot-button issues such as the hardships befalling blue-collar workers (“Skeleton Crew”) and urban education (“Pipeline”) have made her a sought-after voice by theaters across the country. As recounted by Hulce, the actor-turned-producer famous to film fans for his role in “National Lampoon’s Animal House” and starring as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Milos Forman’s Oscar-winning “Amadeus,” he mentioned “two or three names” to an influential acquaintance as to a book writer for the project, “And he said, ‘Dominique Morisseau.’ ” 


“Ain’t Too Proud – The Life and Times of The Temptations.” (Joel Dockendorf)

Born and raised in Detroit, where she graduated from a high school for gifted and talented students, and went on to the University of Michigan, where she honed her writing skills, Morisseau was steeped in knowledge of the city and the lore of Motown. “The Temptations is my parents’ favorite group,” she said, recalling stories of how the group’s members also grew up there. None of this was lost on the producers: Pittelman had for several years held the option on the rights to the Temptations’ music, and after he and Hulce read her plays, several set in the Motor City, she became their first and only choice.

“There is something about her language that is her own, and connected to Detroit,” Hulce said.

The Temptations’ string of R&B successes is of such a magnitude — “42 top-10 hits and 16 number ones,” said Pittelman — that there could be no problem with audiences being heart-meltingly familiar with the archives. “My Girl,” “Get Ready,” “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg,” “I Could Never Love Another (After Loving You)”, “Just My Imagination” — and, as they say on those late-night commercials, there’s more! The composition of the group, which, by the way, still performs, has changed dramatically over the years since the breakthrough in the mid-1960s; there have been two dozen Temptations who have cycled in and out of the group.

It is Williams’s 2012 memoir “The Temptations” on which the show is based, with a concentration on its storytelling from the mid-’60s to 1974 and some of the group’s earliest members, such as Paul Williams, Mel Franklin, Eddie Kendricks and David Ruffin. (Smokey Robinson, who wrote some of the group’s best-known songs, is a character in the musical, as well.) Morisseau has tried to link their stories to the tumultuous currents of the times, which correspond to the accelerating influence of African American artists on the music industry, as well as to the burgeoning civil rights movement. 

“There is something important about artists and where they stand in a moment of civic unrest,” she said. “It feels like we’re having this contemporary conversation [in the show] about another time.”

As McAnuff notes, the Temptations were pioneers in multiple respects, not the least of these concerning the particularly theatrical style of performance they honed. Modeled on influencers such as the Cadillacs, the Temptations dazzlingly incorporated dance into their act. “The Cadillacs knew about movement and choreography, but the Temptations took that to an entirely new level,” the director said.

This placed a daunting responsibility on choreographer Sergio Trujillo. Although his credits have included “Jersey Boys” — also directed by McAnuff — and another more recent, dance-oriented jukebox show, “On Your Feet!,” the story of Gloria and Emilio Estefan, Trujillo came to “Ain’t Too Proud” feeling he had to prove himself again. “Of all the shows that I have done, this is the one that has the most pressure,” he said, “because these guys were known for their moves.”

Expect to see a lot of those moves onstage in the Eisenhower Theater, and even a few more. It seems that the young actors who have been recruited might be able to out-Temptation the actual Temptations. “The things that I have them doing,” Trujillo said with a laugh, “I don’t know that the real David Ruffin could do.”

[embedded content]

Ain’t Too Proud: The Life and Times of the Temptations, book by Dominique Morisseau, music and lyrics from the Motown catalogue. Directed by Des McAnuff and choreographed by Sergio Trujillo. June 19-July 22 at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. kennedy-center.org or 202-467-4600.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Last-Minute Plans: 127 Free, Cheap & Easy Things To Do In Seattle This Weekend: June 15-17, 2018

Panicking because you haven’t yet made plans for the weekend and you’re short on cash? Don’t worry—aside from all of the last-minute Father’s Day events happening, there are also plenty of other options for last-minute entertainment that won’t cost more than $10. See them all below, ranging from the Fremont Solstice Parade and Fair to the Festival Sundiata’s Black Arts Fest and a Community Juneteenth Celebration, and from South Lake Union’s Seattle Outdoor Cinema opening night and accompanying Solstice Night Market to dance parties like the Best of Bootie and HOTLANTA. For even more options, check out our complete Things To Do calendar.

Stay in the know! Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app (available for iOS and Android), or delivered to your inbox.


Jump to: Friday | Saturday | Sunday


FRIDAY

ART

1. U-District Art Walk
This art walk happens the third Friday of every month and features art in cool funky business of the U-District such as Chaco Canyon, Cafe Solstice, Gargoyles Statuary, and Moksha. This month, check out Goddesses Creating Goddesses.
(University District)

COMMUNITY

2. Womxn, Wine and Tarot with Night Flowers Tarot Collective
Pick up some sex tips, get a tarot reading from Night Flowers Tarot Collective, and sip complimentary sangria.
(Capitol Hill, free)

FILM

3. Hollywood and the Homefront
Hollywood’s World War II effort—dramas, documentaries, radio programs, and live performances—will be presented by audio historian John Jensen.
(University District, free)

GEEK & GAMING

4. Crosscut Trivia Obscura and Bingo Night
Crosscut‘s Knute Berger, Atlas Obscura’s Jared Steed, and MOHAI’s Sondra Snyder will host a trivia night dedicated to Washington State factoids. Once the game’s over, stay for a round of local-oddity-themed bingo.
(Ballard, free)

MUSIC

5. Alma y Azucar Quintet
Latin jazz quintet Alma y Azucar will serenade your wine tasting experience.
(Downtown, free)

6. Band in Seattle: Lion’s Ambition & Ben Union
Band in Seattle’s featured artists this session are soulful genre-blenders Lion’s Ambition and local singer-songwriter Ben Union, and they’ll be taping a live television segment at Victory Studios, with free beer, live performances, and post-set music trivia.
(Queen Anne, $10)

7. Benoît Pioulard, Medina/Walsh, Loom
The Seattle musician’s leaned heavily on his Eno-/Basinski-esque ambient proclivities over the last couple of years, to stunning effect. But people should know that Pioulard (aka Thomas Meluch) also excels in hushed singer/songwriter mode, as his earliest Kranky output and his work with Rafael Anton Irisarri in Orcas prove. Sweet glumness and melodic delicacy rule, with Pioulard’s innate chillness pervading every move. DAVE SEGAL
(Sodo, $10)

8. Bootie Seattle: Best of Bootie
Seattle’s only all-mashup dance party throws down for an all-out party by paying tribute to themselves for eight years of rock, pop, hiphop, rap, and dance music. Prep thyself for all the celebratory club bangers and Top40 hits you could possibly handle.
(Capitol Hill, $10)

9. Calypso Cocktail Hour with Tom Eddy
Let Tom Eddy of Beat Connection and the Dip put you on island time for an hour, with choice vinyl selections of tunes from the Caribbean Islands.
(Capitol Hill, free)

10. Elephant Gun Riot, Veio, Death By Overkill
Spokane-based hard rock quintet Elephant Gun Riot will be joined by Veio and Death By Overkill.
(West Seattle, $8)

11. Gabriel Wolfchild & The Northern Light, Devin Sinha, Katie Kuffel
Sway to a mix of acoustic sounds and “cinematic alternative rock” from singer-songwriter Gabriel Wolfchild as he plays songs from his debut EP, Mornings Like These. Also on the bill: The Northern Light, Devin Sinha, and Katie Kuffel.
(Belltown, $10)

12. Gaytheist, Old Iron, Maximum Mad
With song titles like “Avenged Seven-Minute Abs,” “Post-Apocalyptic Lawsuit,” and “Wisdom of the Asshole,” it’s easy to realize that for as loud as Portland-based trio Gaytheist can get, they’re far from being the kind of metal band that takes themselves too seriously. Their latest album, 2017’s Let’s Jam Again Soon, explodes with short, fast rock ‘n’ roll fun, played with a sharp hardcore edge. Good to Die labelmates Old Iron also released one of the heaviest metal releases from the Northwest last year, Lupus Metallorum. Show up early to let them bathe you in their pure sonic fury. KEVIN DIERS
(Beacon Hill, $10)

13. Good Bones // Hippy And The Squids // Athena McIntyre
Bop to rock and pop from Good Bones, Hippy And the Squids, and Athena McIntyre.
(Greenwood, $7)

14. Killer Workout, Fruit Juice, Pop Cycle, Colorworks
Originally known as the West, high-energy rockers Killer Workout aim to provide just that—an active canvas of danceable beats for their audience to groove to.
(Eastlake, $10)

15. LGBTQ Outdancing – Dyke March Fundraiser
Raise money for Dyke March by grooving to all manner of dance-partner-worthy genres at this special Pride edition of Outdancing.
(Capitol Hill, $10)

16. Megan Larson
See Seattle singer/songwriter Megan Larson perform for free.
(Downtown, free)

17. Monty Banks
Crooner/pianist Monty Banks and friends will keep you company.
(First Hill, free)

18. Nearly Nashville, John Hamhock & the Enablers
Tap your toes to country and honky tonk with Nearly Nashville and their friends John Hamhock & the Enablers.
(Lake City, $8)

19. Olympic Sessions in The Terrace: Bryson Foster Band
Head to the classic hotel’s fancy lobby bar for a live pop/soul/blues set from Tacoma’s Bryson Foster Band.
(Downtown, free)

20. Respect The Vibez Mixtape Release Show and Summer Kickoff
Hear a compilation of tunes and poems by talented youth made in Seattle’s Totem Star recording studio this past year.
(West Seattle, free)

21. Roemen & The Whereabouts
Hear your favorite tunes by Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, the Supremes, Otis Redding, and other legends from tribute band Roemen & the Whereabouts.
(Pioneer Square, free)

22. Valley Soul, The Thrill, The Loveless Building, The Forgotten 45s
Monterey, California indie rock foursome Valley Soul hail are here to share their love of Fleetwood Mac, Arcade Fire, and Head and the Heart. They’ll be joined by the Thrill, the Loveless Building, and the Forgotten 45s.
(Pioneer Square, $8)

23. World Beat Night: Rhythms from Black Panther
Master percussionist Massamba Diop of Baaba Maal will perform rhythms from the Black Panther soundtrack and score with support from Walo Walo, Thione Diop, and members of Wamba World Beat Band.
(Columbia City, $10)

PERFORMANCE

24. Drag For The Ages
RainBowGore Cake will host this all-ages show to bring drag to the masses. Alongside high school performers, guests include Eamon Smith, Harlotte O’Scara, and Butylene O’Kipple.
(Capitol Hill, $5-$10)

READINGS & TALKS

25. Deborah Reber: Differently Wired
Learn about neurodiverse children from Deborah Reber, author and mother of a gifted child with ADHD and Asperger’s.
(Ravenna, free)

26. Edward Hallowell: Because I Come From a Crazy Family
The author Edward M. Hallowell (Driven to Distraction) will present his memoir Because I Come from a Crazy Family, about his WASP family, mental illness, alcoholism, and ambition.
(University District, free)

27. Ellen Welcker, Madeline McNeill: The Pink Tablet
Opera singer Madeline McNeill has composed Spokane poet Ellen Welcker’s new collection, The Pink Tablet: A Feral Opera, into songs, which she’ll perform live.
(Wallingford, free)

28. Georgia Hunter: We Were the Lucky Ones
Georgia Hunter shares her 15-year-old discovery that she comes from a family of Holocaust survivors in her new memoir, We Were the Lucky Ones.
(University District, free)

29. Looking Back at Forward Thrust: A Community Conversation Hosted by Shaun Scott
A little history lesson: Activist Jim Ellis pushed for civic change with a number of ballot initiatives called Forward Thrust from 1968 to 1970, and that’s partly why we have so many lovely parks, pools, and playgrounds. Historian Shaun Scott invites you to revisit Forward Thrust in the light of the city’s new needs, especially in terms of mass transit, at this Town Hall-sponsored conversation series.
(University District, free)

30. Poe Ballantine: Whirlaway
This madcap-sounding novel follows an escapee from an asylum, a telepathic dog, a record collector, and a long-dead brother.
(Capitol Hill, free)

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

31. Revenance: An Evening of Honors Projects
Find out what those Seattle University arts kids are up to at this showcase of honors projects, including two plays: Frances Bringloe’s “Birdwatch” and Gabrielle Sigrist’s solo piece “babushka of the deep green.”
(Capitol Hill, free)

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

ART

32. Strange Coupling
According to Emily Pothast: “A UW School of Art tradition for over a decade, Strange Coupling pairs up working artists with current UW students to create collaborative artworks and community connections.” This year’s artists include Christopher Paul Jordan + Adrian Gomez, coley mixan + Hannah Moujing, Elby Brosch + Koi Nil, George Lee + Amy Wang, Hongzhe (Benji) Liang + Nadine Marie Emmons, Mackenzie Waller + Connor Walden, Mary Ann Peters + Isabela Noriega, and Quenton Baker + Yabsira Wolde. What a lineup!
(Columbia City, free)
Closing Sunday

33. Suffer for Beauty: Women’s History Revealed Through Undergarments
Women have struggled in and out of figure-shaping undergarments since ancient times. (In the Iliad, Aphrodite passes her girdle to Hera and says, “Take this girdle wherein all my charms reside and lay it in your bosom.”) Suffer for Beauty covers 90 years of undergarments and includes everything from wire bustles to restrictive bodices, pregnancy corsets to pointed bras. One of the displays features the Mark Eden bust developer, which co-curator Patricia Cosgrove tracked down to include in the show. As a teenager, Patricia ordered one of the pink spring-loaded clamshells, heavily advertised in the 1960s, to help her bust line go “from the average or below average to a richer fuller development.” I didn’t ask Patricia about her bust size, but I do know that Mark Eden was eventually shut down by the USPS for mail fraud. KATIE KURTZ
(Auburn, $5)
Closing Sunday

FESTIVALS

34. Edmonds Arts Festival
Enjoy three days of arts, entertainment, shopping, and dining, with a wide selection of more than 240 artist booths, three juried galleries, over 1,000 pieces of student art, more than 20 food vendors, and other attractions.
(Edmonds, free)

35. Marysville Strawberry Festival
Enjoy all Marysville has to offer: Parades, a carnival, markets, a car show, the Berry Run, and a strawberry shortcake-eating contest.
(Marysville, free)

SATURDAY

ART

36. ‘AFTER LIFE (what remains)’ Opening Reception
In this group show, curated by UW Bothell lecturer Dr. Thea Quiray Tagle, indigenous and Asian Pacific American artists use art and performance to begin the work of healing from military occupation, economic displacement, and environmental catastrophe. Through a suite of multimedia works, Super Futures Haunt Collective (SFHQ) stages a conversation among indigenous ancestors, using technology and imagination to bridge time and space. Their work serves as a hinge to connect artists Alejandro T. Acierto, Rea Tajiri, Michael Arcega, and Leeroy New, who critically examine the forces of colonialism and posit possible strategies for livability in an age that is “increasingly toxic for the poor to live in.” EMILY POTHAST
(Georgetown, free)

37. Long Shot 2018: Pop-Up Exhibit & Party
On June 16, one image from every person who participated in the 24-hour photo shoot contest Long Shot on June 9 (for which anyone around the world could take photos and submit them) will be exhibited at a pop-up gallery. In exchange for a donation, take home an image by a local image-snapper. The theme of this year’s exhibit is “Chase the Light.”
(Capitol Hill, free)

38. Making and Unmaking the Body
Delve into Martha Friedman’s Castoffs with curator Nina Bozicnik, performer/writer Stevi Costa, dancer Alyza DelPan-Monley, and art historian Naomi Hume, who’ll discuss the exhibition’s implications for gender, sculpture, and experience.
(University District, $10)

39. Solstice Raku Party
Fire up some ceramic art, drink booze, and share dishes in a potluck after the Fremont Solstice Fair.
(Ballard, free)

40. Teen Art Showcase & Comic Release
Welcome the work of teen comics artists into the world and enjoy some light refreshments.
(Ballard, free)

COMEDY

41. Hot Takes with Hot Dykez
“Cool, real, lezbian comedy couple” Val Nigro and Clara Pluto run this podcast out of Hollow Earth Radio, and they’ve attracted positive press from City Arts and performed at the Dyke March and Intersections Festival. This time, they’ll perform with a kickin’ lineup of queer stand-up artists, including Ruth Blinderman, Finn Cottom, Max Delsohn, Monisa Brown, and Corina Lucas.
(Capitol Hill, $10 suggested donation)

COMMUNITY

42. 3rd Annual Summer BBQ + Community Open House
Learn about Coyote Central, an educational outreach program that provides youth in underserved communities with all sorts of creative programs, at this free BBQ and open house. You’ll get to see student performances, dance to live music, and more.
(Downtown, free)

43. Creating Privacy and Sanctuary
Learn gardening tips to make your property a little more private with landscaper Richard Greenberg.
(Madrona, free)

44. Critter Connections
Looking for a new pet? Stop by to learn about adopting bunnies, guinea pigs, and other creatures.
(Downtown, free)

45. Digitize Your African American History
People with African American heritage are invited to bring artifacts, photos, videos, stories, songs, genealogies, and more to this digital archiving event aimed at preserving black history.
(Renton, $5)

46. Free Ice Cream Sundaes for Dogs
The Seattle Barkery truck will offer free canine-friendly ice cream sundaes to good dogs.
(Queen Anne, free)

47. Giant Cow in the Ballard Locks
In honor of Dairy Month, witness Bessie the inflatable Holstein cow’s maiden voyage to Lake Union by way of barge. You can also sample free local dairy treats, learn about sustainable local farming practices, and take selfies with Bessie in order to prove their motto: “You never know what you’ll see at the Locks.”
(Ballard, free)

48. Graduating Students of Color Celebration
This public reception celebrates Seattle University’s 2018 graduating students of color.
(Capitol Hill, free)

49. How to Be an Organizer
Learn the process of grassroots organizing, from canvassing to personal story development, with 7th Congressional District representative Pramila Jayapal.
(Phinney, free)

50. Let’s Go Birding Together
LGBTQ+ audubon enthusiasts are invited to go on a guided bird walk after enjoying hot drinks and Pride-themed doughnuts.
(Rainier Valley, $7)

51. Nurturing the Environment and Food Access
Find out how the injustices of slavery, segregation, and land deprivation are perpetuated in people of color’s lack of access to healthy food and environments with the DNDA Let’s Talk Race series.
(West Seattle, free)

52. Stand Up for Lolita!
Help raise awareness of Lolita, the last survivor from the largest orca capture in history, and protest her life in captivity at SeaWorld.
(Downtown, free)

53. Wild Tensions Exhibit Family Day
Kids and families can make their own snacks at a trail mix bar, learn about the lives of native wild animals, build wilderness shelters, and explore the region’s relationship with the wilderness and outdoor recreation.
(Downtown, free)

54. World Migratory Bird Day
Take a guided walk of the Kirkland park to spot native feathered friends. You’ll also learn about the perils birds face on their migratory routes, play bird-related games, and make bird crafts.
(Kirkland, free)

FESTIVALS

55. Fremont Solstice Parade
Join the ranks of giant puppets, stilt walkers, floats, dancers, cyclists, and musicians on the longest day of the year for a “kaleidoscope of joyous human expression,” aka Fremont Arts Council’s annual summer solstice parade. The event will culminate in Gas Works Park for the Fremont Solstice Fair.
(Fremont, free)

56. Morgan Junction Festival 2018
If you’re over in West Seattle, enjoy this community festival full of food, activities, and performances. Highlights include the Amazing Bubble Man, the Endolyne Children’s Choir, and a juried dog parade.
(West Seattle, free)

57. Othello-Bration
Celebrate Inflorescence, a new mural by Craig Cundriff and Ari Glass, as well as the opening of the “Beet Box” fresh food pop-up. There will also be performances, raffle prizes, and more.
(Rainier Beach, free)

58. Solstice Night Market
Take advantage of increasingly longer and warmer days by shopping for handmade goods and local art well into the evening. Vendors will include Sam Choy’s Poke to the Max truck, the Fire and Scrape raclette booth, Bluebird Ice Cream, and Pure Vintage Clothing.
(South Lake Union, free)

59. UHeights Summer Music Festival
Rather than one weekend overwhelmed with activity, University Heights will break their summer fun into two-hour sets every Saturday from June to September. Each weekend will feature live music from bands of every genre, world dance troupes, and children’s shows. The whole series is free to the public, with food available from the U-District Farmers Market each weekend.
(University District, free)

FILM

60. Saturday Morning Kung Fu Theater: Men from the Gutter
Early risers can spend their Saturday mornings watching classic martial arts cinema (courtesy of Push/Pull film archivists) over coffee and donuts. Get a boost for the rest of the day. This week’s movie is a 1983 revenge flick called Men from the Gutter.
(Ballard, free)

61. Seattle Outdoor Cinema
This 21+ series invites you to snack on street food from the Solstice Night Market, drink cold beer, and relish classic movies like tonight’s choice: The Goonies .
(South Lake Union, free)

FOOD & DRINK

62. Wusthof Block Party
See cooking and cutting demonstrations, get your knives sharpened, test out merchandise under supervision, and snag special deals and giveaways.
(University District, free)

GEEK & GAMING

63. Board Game & Miniature Swap Meeting
Buy, sell, or trade board games, card games, roleplaying games and miniatures at this quarterly event hosted by OOP Games & Hobby.
(North Seattle, free)

64. Gay Bingo
Join Seattle queen Karmen Korbel for a queer-centric night of bingo. Proceeds will benefit Lifelong.
(Montlake, donation)

65. Mini Game Day
The library’s meeting room tables will be covered with indie board games, dice games, and role playing games by local designers. A few of the makers will even be onsite to show you how to play. This weekend’s edition will be Pride-themed.
(Skyway, free)

66. Queer Gaming with the Grand Arbiter
Join the Grand Arbiter of Madame Askew’s Temporal Entourage for a Pride-themed night of tabletop games.
(Capitol Hill, free)

MUSIC

67. Brass Band Northwest: On The Town
If prolific modern composer Leonard Bernstein were still alive, he’d be 100 this year. So Brass Band Northwest will spend their spring season finale hailing his legacy with a program including their favorites of his selected works. This June, they’ll present three dances from On The Town (1947).
(Bellevue, $10)

68. Burn Burn Burn, Se Vende, Shaolin Hunks, New Bloom
Satan-loving punks and “Seattle hawt boyz” Burn Burn Burn will headline out in the U-District, with bill support from Se Vende, Shaolin Hunks, and New Bloom.
(University District, $7)

69. Champagne Sunday, Athena McIntyre, Angie Lynn
Join indie rock duo Champagne Sunday, who describe their sound as “Pearl Jam meets Bette Midler,” for a show with Athena McIntyre and Angie Lynn.
(Ballard, $8)

70. Crown Villains, Seers, The Sky Giants, Nails Hide Metal
Bluesy, grungey group Crown Villains will be joined by Seers, The Sky Giants, and Nails Hide Metal for a night of Northwest rock and roll.
(West Seattle, $8)

71. Delilah Pearl and the Mantarays
This Vashon Island band headed by Delilah Pearl will play old-school jazz shot through with warm soul.
(First Hill, free)

72. Disease, Savage, Bummer, Minor in Possession, Smokers Cough
Get wild at this early, all-ages grindcore and power violence show with live sets by Disease, Savage, Bummer, Minor in Possession, and Smokers Cough.
(Tukwila, $5)

73. DT Jackson, Kylan Johnson, The Wilder, Glass Souls
Dance to indie rock “with a light dose of punk mentality” from DT Jackson after sets from Kylan Johnson, The Wilder, and Glass Souls.
(Shoreline, $8)

74. Fremont Solstice Celebration
Sway all day and night to “slow-smoked soul ballads” from Nashville experimental blues rockers SIMO at this summer solstice party. When they’re not on stage, DJ Indica Jones will spin ’80s and ’90s dance party jams and KEXP’s DJ Chilly will spin a Latin mix.
(Fremont, free)

75. Fremont Solstice Parade After Party
Warm up with a cool-down at a Substation-hosted after party show once you’re done strutting through the Fremont Solstice Parade. Enjoy live sets from Sweet Lou’s Sour Mash, Hot Damn Scandal, and Dysfunction Junction.
(Ballard, free)

76. Great Time, Soultanz, Richie Aldente
New York’s Great Time is inspired by the gentleness of Sufjan Stevens, and the dancey songs of Little Dragon. Hear their sound with support from Soultanz and Richie Aldente.
(Columbia City, $10)

77. Harness, Shook Ones, RJC, Will To Power, Ballistics
Regional Justice Center will celebrate the release of their new record with a night of trashing along with Will To Power, Ballistics, Harness, and Shook Ones.
(Eastlake, $5-$10)

78. Haute Sauce: Lourawk, Famous, D-Look, Swervewon
Haute Sauce resident DJs Lourawk, Famous, D-Look, and Swervewon will strike again with a night of hiphop beats.
(Capitol Hill, $10)

79. Heart Avail, The Sinbound Post Rapture Party, Nordic Daughter
Spokane rockers Heart Avail will headline after sets from the Sinbound Post Rapture Party and Nordic Daughter.
(Ballard, $5)

80. Hot Nights, Cool Jazz
Pair your loves of museum-hopping and lindy-hopping at this free live set of after-hours jazz. You can dance and enjoy the music, or make your own tunes with upcycled pieces at the Instrument Petting Zoo, or stroll around and check out Seattle on the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith before the exhibit closes.
(South Lake Union, free)

81. HOTLANTA
Pretend it’s 20 degrees hotter than it really is with this dance night dedicated to all things Atlanta (including the humidity).
(Capitol Hill, $5)

82. Mark Christian Miller
Los Angeles-based jazz vocalist Mark Christian Miller will return to Seattle on the wave of success from his 2015 album Crazy Moon to perform tracks from his latest album Story Time for Adults, with instrumental support by pianist Bill Anschell, bassist Chris Symer, and drummer Robert Rushing.
(Ballard, $10)

83. Nighttime Serenade
The Seattle Philharmonic Strings’ final show of the season will feature a program of romantic classics like Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and Vaughan Williams’ Violin Concerto and Dvořák’s Serenade for Strings.
(Downtown, free)

84. Obsidian, Oxygen Destroyer, Schmutzund, Born Without Blood
Hear Seattle thrash metal from Oxygen Destroyer, with opening sets by Born Without Blood, Oxygen Destroyer, and Schmutzund.
(Eastlake, $8/$10)

85. Porch Cat, Mira Death, Sunday Night Heat
Rage gently and collectively with “sludgy, spooky” queer punks Porch Cat (Bellingham), Mira Death (of Portland’s Sweeping Exits), and “wrestle-centric punk rock super group Sunday Night heat (featuring members from CutMan, Dude York, the Complex Dialect, and Dogbreth).
(University District, $6-$10)

86. Slower Than Dirt Jam
Beginner musicians can learn some tunes in a no-pressure environment. This time, songs include “Arkansas Traveler,” “Bonaparte Crossing the Rhine,” “Possum up a Gum Stump,” and other simple folksy ditties.
(Green Lake, free)

87. School of Rock West Seattle: Queen
Watch the tiny musical treasures of the future play the power glam rock relics of the past, with School of Rock West Seattle’s tribute to the kings of arena spectacle, Queen.
(Belltown, $10)

88. Sing It Seattle!
Do you love popular pop, rock, and Broadway hits and don’t care who knows it? Here’s a chance to learn vocal harmonies to a tune in one of those genres, which the group will vote on.
(Downtown, $5)

89. The Tom Price Desert Classic, The Control Freaks, The Knights of Trash, The Heels
Since Tom Price, a masterful minimalist, was never part of Seattle’s pop,-metal, or grunge scenes, it’s easy to take him for granted, but that would be a mistake. From the U-Men to Gas Huffer to Monkeywrench, the singer-guitarist has stayed true to his garage-punk roots: no sellout moves, no major-label deals. If age hasn’t diminished his fire, Parkinson’s disease has put a dent in his productivity, but the Tom Price Desert Classic isn’t a job; it’s the culmination of a lifelong passion, and the band has only released one album in eight years (2014’s Hell). With Joe Kilbourne (bass), Martin Bland (drums), and Don Blackstone (guitar), they also bring it live. As their Facebook page proclaims: “pretty loud, w/yelling.” KATHY FENNESSY
(Georgetown, $7)

PERFORMANCE

90. Arson Explains It All (Episode 2)
Get to know Seattle queen Arson Nicki through “real stories, hard truths, and sharp lip syncs” at this musical monologue.
(Capitol Hill, $7)

91. Seattle University Student Playwrights
Seattle University student playwrights will read short original pieces they’ve been working on this semester.
(Capitol Hill, free)

READINGS & TALKS

92. D.J. Butler, Christopher Husberg, and Cat Rambo
D.J. Butler, the author of the American flintlock fantasy novel Witchy Eye, will share its fantastical sequel. Joining her will be fellow fantasy authors Christopher Husberg and Cat Rambo.
(University District, free)

93. Graphic Medicine Comics Workshop
Local zine/comics artists Kelly Froh and Max Clotfelter will teach you about the “personal health narrative” genre of comics and help you make your own art.
(Downtown, free)

94. Japanese Folktales by Lori Whaley
Lori Whaley will tell classic Japanese folktales with puppets while you sit in the tranquil garden.
(Downtown, $6/$8)

95. Lindsey Boldt, Steffi Drewes, Paul Ceballos Hlava
Get to know the work of local poets Lindsey Boldt, Steffi Drewes, and Paul Ceballos Hlava at this group reading.
(Wallingford, free)

96. Ulysses Bloomsday Staged Reading
Calling Irish literature nerds: What are you doing for Bloomsday? If you haven’t made plans yet to mark the date on which James Joyce’s mammoth novel Ulysses takes place, during which the protagonist Leopold Bloom travels picaresquely through Dublin, don’t sweat it. This year’s reading picks up from last year’s with Chapter 8, “Lestrygonians,” and Chapter 9, “Scylla and Charybdis.” Whether you’ve read the great 20th-century classic or not, this is a great way to commune in love for the possibilities of the English language. (We’re not sure we should add this, but apparently Joyce set the book on June 16 to commemorate a particularly significant real-life handjob. Just so you know what you’re celebrating.)
(Downtown, free)

97. Zinzi Clemmons: What We Lose
A mixed-race American woman, Thandi, tries to find a connection from her life to her dying mother’s Johannesburg childhood.
(Capitol Hill, free)

RESISTANCE & SOLIDARITY

98. Stand With Refugees
One Day’s Wages and World Relief Seattle invite participants to “step into the shoes of refugees” in Seattle and beyond through film, storytelling, and conversations with experts.
(Ballard, $10)

SPORTS & RECREATION

99. All Gender Public Swim
Take a dip in one of two accessible pools at the Capitol Hill facility for two bucks. Locker rooms will be gender neutral for the duration of the swim, and private changing rooms will be available as well.
(Capitol Hill, $2)

100. Flat-Track Season Kick-off Party
Meet motorbike racer Rustin Olson, see a flat-tracker on display, and peruse a pop-up shop with limited-edition race shirts.
(Belltown, free)

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

ART

101. Bench Mark
See the fruit of an after-school program for young artists, an investigation of urban architecture and the way it alters human behavior.
(First Hill, free)
Opening Saturday

102. Nan Wonderly
Discover the possibilities of upcycled art with Nan Wonderly’s repurposed tin collages.
(Ballard, free)
Opening Saturday

COMMUNITY

103. Community Juneteenth Celebration
On Juneteenth, which marks the emancipation of enslaved African Americans throughout the former Confederacy of the southern United States, join Langston in remembering the late DeCharlene Williams, a longtime Central District resident and activist who passed away in May.
(Central District, free)

104. Greenpeace Ship Tours
Join Greenpeace aboard the Arctic Sunrise to learn about life at sea as an environmental activist.
(South Lake Union, free)

FESTIVALS

105. 2018 Chittenden Locks Summer Concert Series
Enjoy live music performances from symphonic bands, show choirs, jazz trios, and more in the gardens by the Ballard Locks. This weekend’s lineup includes the street organ sounds of Musica Molida on Saturday and the Elliott Bay Pipe Band on Sunday.
(Ballard, free)

106. Black Arts Fest
Festival Sundiata presents a two-day celebration of African American culture, including African dance and drumming workshops, fashion demonstrations, a market, food, and more.
(Seattle Center, free)

107. Fremont Solstice Fair
Let that free spirit fill you with whatever Fremont people are into at the annual Fremont Solstice Fair, a massive outdoor urban festival filled fit to bust with hippies, families, foodies, and artists. It’s primarily known for the parade, featuring elaborately painted (and sometimes just wild ‘n’ free) nude bicyclists, but also offers tons of food, crafts, activities, performances, great people-watching, a dog parade, and a beer garden.
(Fremont, free)

GEEK & GAMING

108. Seattle Retro Gaming Expo
Play free arcade and video games from the early aughts, listen in on panel discussions with serious collectors and experts, bop around to video game music, pick up crafts, and learn about indie games you might not know about.
(Seattle Center, free)

SUNDAY

ART

109. An Afternoon of Sun and Stone
Meander among sculptures by the Northwest Stone Sculptors Association at this picnic, sale, and social occasion.
(Capitol Hill, free)

COMEDY

110. U Can’t Walk it Off-Comedy Show for Men and those Who Love Them
For Men’s Health Month, this comedy show “for men and the women who love them” will feature Corrina Lee Allen, Dave Dennison, Tony Daniel, Geoff Lott, Jason Goad, and Cortney Gee.
(University District, $10)

COMMUNITY

111. Legal Voice Community Celebration
Legal Voice will celebrate 40 years of service with a day at the beach. Stop by for drinks, food, and family activities.
(Ballard, free)

112. Westwood Village Street Fair
Enjoy a day of carnival rides and games in West Seattle.
(West Seattle, free)

FILM

113. Ritoma
This documentary by Oscar-winning Ruby Yang follows nomadic Tibetans who gear up for a tournament led by Everett native and former Kamiak basketballer Bill Johnson.
(Everett, free)

114. Shriek! Cruising
Evan J. Peterson and Heather Bartels curate this film and community education series that examines the role of women and minorities in horror films. Have a drink and watch Cruising, William Friedkin (The Exorcist)’s thriller starring Al Pacino as an undercover cop chasing a serial killer in San Francisco’s gay BDSM community.
(Greenwood, $10)

FOOD & DRINK

115. Magnuson Food & Flea
Eat brunch at the park at this pop-up food market.
(North Seattle, free)

MUSIC

116. Brianna Skye & the Dark Clouds EP Release Party
Party with indie rockers Brianna Skye and the Dark Clouds as they celebrate their first EP with support from Waking Things and Xnarcotix.
(Fremont, $6/$8)

117. Day Shift: Get Up Offa That Thing!
Indulge in Sunday day-drinking and day-dancing with talented DJs Francesca Harding (LA), Phosho, DJ Vega B2B LouRawk, DJ Famous B2B DJ Rocryte, U.NO.HU, Ahold Of, and mk. Stay a little or stay long enough to watch the sun go down.
(Georgetown, $5 before 5pm)

118. Forest For The Trees
Bring a basket of snacks and a picnic blanket and spend the day outside dancing to live DJs.
(Rainier Valley, free)

119. KEXP DJ Summer Series at Brewlab
Spend your summer Sundays grooving to tunes from KEXP DJs Abbie and Atticus while you sip a hazy grapefruit “Abbicus” IPA brewed just for the occasion.
(Capitol Hill, free)

120. The Midnight Avocados, Proud Dad, The Spill, Always Naked
The Midnight Avocados are a progressive indie rock band from California. They’ll be joined by Proud Dad, The Spill, and Always Naked.
(Eastlake, $6/$8)

121. New Wave Night
Enjoy covers of New Wave hits by local artists like Adra Boo, Kurt Bloch, Ryan Devlin & Kim West, Tomo Nakayama, Ian McCutcheon, Taryn Dorsey, and Andrew Vait.
(Capitol Hill, $10)

122. The Sinbound, Heart Avail, Nordic Daughter, Exapsos
Self-proclaimed Seattle rock and roll resurrectors the Sinbound will bring the rock back to the north end, with support sets by Heart Avail, Nordic Daughter, and Exapsos.
(Greenwood, $5)

123. Spontaneous Music Session Featuring Kenny Mandell Open to All Levels
Be spontaneous for once and join an improvised music jam session hosted by Kenny Mandell.
(Greenwood, free)

124. Sunday Fun Day Music – Back to the 80s
VideoDJ Andy will take you back the ’80s with classic music videos.
(White Center, free)

READINGS & TALKS

125. Nick DiMartino: The Grow House
Not only is Nick DiMartino a playwright and musical theater adapter whose productions of Dracula, Pinocchio, and The Snow Queen were performed by Seattle Children’s Theatre, he’s also been the campus book-buyer for the University Book Store for over 40 years. Hear him read from his latest suspense novel, The Grow House, which is set in Seattle but has nothing to do with pot.
(University District, free)

126. ‘Power And’: A Roundtable Discussion About Why The Powers That Be, Are
The Seventh Wave arts and literary association will lead a discussion on social issues and power dynamics “through the lens of privilege, privacy, gender, or politics.”
(Wallingford, free)

SPORTS & RECREATION

127. Bicycle Sundays
A section of Lake Washington Boulevard between the Seward Park entrance and Mount Baker Park’s beach will be closed to cars and motorcycles from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sundays. Meet in the park’s lower meadow to peddle along the route with a group.
(Rainier Valley, free)

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

San Francisco’s First Black Female Mayor Went from Projects to City Hall

By JANIE HAR, The Associated Press

San Francisco’s incoming mayor knows the yawning gap between rich and poor firsthand, having been raised by her grandmother in the city’s drug- and violence-riddled projects.

It is now the job of London Breed — the first Black woman elected mayor of the city — to unite a wealthy but conflicted San Francisco, where the high-tech economy has sent the median price of a home soaring to $1.3 million and where homeless tents and human waste fester on sidewalks.

Incoming mayor London Breed speaks at Rosa Parks Elementary School in San Francisco, June 14. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

People who know her say the 43-year-old Breed has the grit, drive and deep love for her hometown to tackle its problems.

“I know where she comes from. I know where she is currently,” said high school classmate Adonne Loggins. “It’s not an easy way to come up. A lot of people fall by the wayside, and she didn’t. That’s a tribute to her character and her willingness to fight.”

Breed, currently president of the 11-member Board of Supervisors, was declared the winner June 13 of last week’s eight-way mayoral election. The Democrat takes office next month.

She is only the second woman to become mayor of San Francisco. The first was Dianne Feinstein, now senator.

San Francisco, with a population of 870,000, is about 6 percent Black, one of the smallest percentages among major U.S. cities.

In her first official speech as mayor-elect on June 14, Breed fondly recalled people telling her to go to college when she didn’t know what that was.

“If it wasn’t for a community that believed in me and supported me and raised me and did what was necessary to make sure that I was a success, I would not be here,” she said to several hundred people at Rosa Parks Elementary School. “But the problem is, I am the exception and not the norm, and as mayor I want to change what is normal in this city.”

Breed wants the technology sector to work with youngsters so that they have a real shot at sharing in the city’s immense wealth. She wants to build more housing more quickly and supports the use of legal conservatorships to get mentally ill people and drug users off the street and into treatment.

She has also promised to end long-term homeless tent camps within a year of taking office.

Breed has a broad smile, a blunt way of speaking and a down-to-earth demeanor. She is a big foodie who lives in a rent-controlled apartment in the city’s fashionably dilapidated Lower Haight neighborhood, blocks from the traditionally Black Western Addition and Fillmore neighborhoods where she grew up.

She unwinds at night by washing dishes by hand — no dishwasher in her unit — and re-hashing her day with friends by phone. Like many other residents of the city, she has been unable to afford a house. That may change; as mayor, she will be paid $335,996 a year.

Breed was raised by her grandmother Comelia Brown, a house cleaner who told a young London to make her bed, clean the kitchen and not even think about skipping school if she wanted to continue living in her house.

She drank powdered milk, and Christmas toys came from the firefighters’ annual giveaway. Her grandmother died in 2016 after a long struggle with dementia.

“I gave my grandma a really hard time. And can I tell you? She never gave up on me,” she said Thursday.

A brother ended up in prison, and a younger sister died of a drug overdose in 2006, but Breed earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Davis and then a master’s in public administration from the University of San Francisco.

Loggins, a classmate at Galileo High, recalls an outspoken, stubborn girl active in school politics and the Black student union who was itching to improve the system. She was voted the girl in her senior class most likely to succeed.

Breed got her start in politics in the mid-1990s as an intern for then-Mayor Willie Brown, writing proclamations and answering mail.

“I was living in public housing,” she recalled in a recent interview at one of her favorite Mexican restaurants. “The ability to get stuff done by saying you’re calling from the mayor’s office was amazing.”

For more than a decade, she headed the African American Art & Culture Complex, beefing up programs for at-risk youth and the elderly. She encouraged a police presence there, not just because of the potential for violence but also because she wanted the youngsters to develop good relationships with police, she said.

In 2012, she decided to challenge the supervisor for her district, appalled that then-Mayor Ed Lee had appointed someone Breed felt was out of touch with the community. Most of the city’s power brokers, including Lee and Brown, told her to stay out, she recalled.

“A lot of people told her it would be an uphill battle, it would be a difficult race to win,” said Debbie Mesloh, president of the San Francisco Commission on the Status of Women. “She said she was going to go to every house and walk every neighborhood, and she did.”

She won, but not before taking heat for an expletive-laden rant about how she wasn’t controlled by anyone, including her mentor, Brown. The rant cost her Feinstein’s endorsement.

Friends and colleagues say Breed has since smoothed the rough edges, but the idea that she is beholden to others, including the business sector that supported her mayoral run, rankles.

“I’m not the old guard,” she said. “I make my own decisions and I do what I feel is the right thing to do, and I stand by the decisions that I make.”

Amelia Ashley-Ward, publisher of the San Francisco Sun-Reporter, called Breed an example to “every young girl everywhere who wants to be something.”

“They just need to stand up and fight for what they want to be, and, yes, be stubborn and hard-headed sometimes,” Ashley-Ward said.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Rangers face Bruno Alves dilemma the World Cup could solve

He splits opinion like Brexit divides Britain. Right down the middle.

On one side stand the Bruno Alves remainers. He’s a European Championship winner, they say, a class act.

The leavers claim he is overpaid, underperforming – an all round waste of money.

To some only one is true. To others, the truth may be found somewhere in the middle.

For all the black arts and shenanigans, veritas is still always to be found on the football pitch.

It is here the wheat is separated from the cheat.

Bruno Alves congratulates Cristiano Ronaldo on his stunning hat-trick against Spain
(Image: PAULO NOVAIS/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)
Bruno Alves congratulates Cristiano Ronaldo after his second goal against Spain this evening
(Image: REUTERS)

The stats don’t lie, and neither do Alves’.

Or do they?

Around 70 per cent of aerial duels won. Check. Twenty eight appearances despite an “injury plagued” season. Check. Experience, poise, solidity. Yep, check. And thank you very much.


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But upwards of £25,000 a week from Rangers ? All that money when Steven Gerrard ‘s backers at boardroom level have since spent around £5million on two centre-backs in Nikola Katic and Connor Goldson and the wages those transfer fees would command?

Maybe, maybe not.

What may crystallise Gerrard’s and Mark Allen’s minds is Alves’ contribution at World Cup 2018.

He failed to start Portugal’s opener. Pepe and Jose Fonte were given the nod and even Portugal shipping a 2-1 lead before hat-trick hero Cristiano Ronaldo rescued a draw didn’t prompt Alves’

Bruno Alves congratulates Cristiano Ronaldo
(Image: PAULO NOVAIS/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)
(Image: SNS)

introduction.

There’s talk of Alves offering an option for Gerrard to play three at the back. Goldson, Katic and Alves. A nice alternative for the Rangers manager to have, sure enough.

But finances and form are the arbitrators. Should Alves have a good World Cup then Rangers’ wish to keep him may increase. Equally so, a stellar showing would make the 36-year-old an easier sell, heightening the chances of offloading a player with one year left on his contract while raising a significant transfer fee.

Either way, Russia may mean not only the world to Alves but also to Rangers.

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Should Rangers keep Bruno Alves or allow him to go if an offer comes in?

24000+ VOTES SO FAR


RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Americans Elect First Black Woman as San Francisco Mayor

London Breed was elected as U.S.'s first black woman mayor in San Francisco State. (Twitter)

London Breed was elected as U.S.’s first black woman mayor in San Francisco State. (Twitter)

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CNN

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San Francisco voters elected the first black woman to preside as mayor of the city after a week-long period to count votes ended Wednesday.

London Breed, a Democrat who currently serves as president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, was finish the term of late San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, who died of a heart attack on Dec. 12. Her term will end in 2020, when she will be up for re-election.

“I’m so hopeful about the future of our city,” Breed told a crowd of supporters Wednesday, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. “I’m looking forward to serving as your mayor, and I’m truly humbled and truly honored.”

Breed beat fellow Democrat Mark Leno in a close race. Voting tallies had Breed up by 2,177 votes with 6,690 left to be counted. But Leno said it was clear Breed would win.

“Just doing the math, we do not see that it is likely to change,” he said.



After Leno called Breed to concede, he said she was a “a remarkable young woman” and wished her “every success both personally and professionally in her new job as mayor of San Francisco.”

“I’m a native San Franciscan — I grew up in some of the most challenging of circumstances,” she said. “I think the message that this sends to the next generation of young people growing up in this city, that no matter where you come from … you can do anything you want to do.”

Breed is a native San Franciscan who was raised by her grandmother in public housing. After earning her Master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of San Francisco, she served as Executive Director of the African American Art & Culture Complex in the Western Addition neighborhood of San Francisco where she grew up. She also served as a San Francisco Redevelopment Agency Commissioner for five years before turning to public service in 2010.

“I’m a native San Franciscan — I grew up in some of the most challenging of circumstances,” Breed said, according to CNN. “I think the message that this sends to the next generation of young people growing up in this city, that no matter where you come from…you can do anything you want to do.”

This article has been adapted from its original source.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment