Black Lives Matter Mural Outside of Cincinnati City Hall Vandalized

Ec75pw G Wo AA Zj PJSecurity camera footage of a person splashing red paint on the Black Lives Matter mural outside Cincinnati City Hall.Cincinnati PoliceAn unidentified person defaced a block-long mural reading “Black Lives Matter” commissioned by the City of Cincinnati and painted by local black artists.

A group of racial justice advocates gathered at the mural around 10 p.m. Tuesday night, blocked off the site on Plum Street with cars, attempted to clean the paint off and chanted “Black Lives Matter.”

The Cincinnati Police Department later that evening released security camera footage showing a man in a face mask spreading red paint over a portion of the mural. Police say the incident occurred early Sunday morning.

“After a review of area surveillance footage this subject played a role in this incident,” Cincinnati Police tweeted, posting a picture of the person. “It occurred on 7/12/20 at 2:20 a.m.”

CPD is asking anyone with information about the vandalism to call Crime Stoppers at 513 352 3040.

The mural was dedicated June 19 — the day widely recognized as Juneteenth, when former slaves in Texas learned about emancipation and were freed.

Roughly 70 artists painted the artwork in front of Cincinnati City Hall. Some Cincinnati City Councilmembers floated a plan to turn the block into a pedestrian-only walkway, though Cincinnati City Manager Patrick Duhaney said that idea presented complications.

Some of the artists involved in the mural are said to be working on a plan to repair it.

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North Star Players’ David Shakes and the bite of change

David Shakes knows what change looks like, and sounds like, and feels like. He finds it in writers such as James Baldwin, whose words have shadowed us as the country navigates the summer of Black Lives Matter.

Shakes is finding change in the words of Frederick Douglass, and in the narratives of slaves. And in “Emancipation Denied,” a play written by a Rochester woman and brought to the stage four years ago by Shakes’ North Star Players.

click to enlarge David Shakes - PHOTO PROVIDED

  • PHOTO PROVIDED
  • David Shakes

Shakes was a friend of Baldwin. That was back in the 1960s, a time when Shakes says “we were ahead of the curve.” There was movement. The civil rights movement. And the Black Arts Movement, where Shakes moved among giants such as Baldwin and the poet Amiri Baraka.

But we didn’t see what was around that curve. With all of the starts and stops of social progress, it has not been a smooth ride. “Emancipation Denied” is the story of the 1921 Tulsa Massacre, a race riot that has been curiously overlooked by the history books. Although, in this summer of the nation’sself examination of its race issues, set off by the murder of George Floyd, Baldwin and the Tulsa Massacre have been increasingly present and accounted for.

Shakes loves history. And he knows that history, as is the case with the Tulsa Massacre, does not play fair.

“Once again it reaffirms the lack of a true representation of the history of our nation,” Shakes says. “Of historic events, that we should look at, and try to learn from, and try to raise the moral bar of where we are.”

And then his arts heart turns to music; his wife Gaya, is a beautiful singer. “I also harken back to a Louis Armstrong song, ‘What a Wonderful World,’” Shakes says. “It’s not the world, it’s what we’re doing to it. And the things we do to each other hit home very much.”

Born in Philadelphia, Shakes grew up in Rochester, and has lived here most of his life. As a young man out of Ithaca College, he moved to New York City and got involved in the Civil Rights Movement. And the Black Arts Movement, politically motivated Black artists, dramatists, musicians and writers.

Shakes’ North Star Players actually grew out of The Baldwin Project, public readings of Baldwin’s writings. As is the case with many arts organizations now, the North Star Players are waiting out the coronavirus pandemic. And Shakes himself is waiting out a frighteningly debilitating illness.

A flesh-eating bacteria gained a foothold on one of his legs. Like something from a horror movie, he admits. Shakes waited a while before seeking treatment, and is slowly on the mend now. But he says one of his doctors told him, “if you waited one more day, that might have been all she wrote.”

Shakes has filled this professional and personal vacuum by reading. He and the North Star Players are discussing ideas for the troupe’s return to the stage. “Emancipation Denied” will be a part of that, likely next year. On the 100th
anniversary of the Tulsa Massacre.

“Emancipation Denied” was written by a local high-school assistant principal, Deborah Solomon. Next year’s version, Shakes says, will feature some updated aspects. Things that more directly reflect today’s discussion on race.

“We hide our history,” Shakes says. “I know myself, I had to learn a lot of my history outside of the classroom, outside of school. You have to go to scholars that are sometimes outside of the system, or you have to go and do some research.

“We hide so many of the things that are there, because of the narrative that wants to be written, and that predominates the schools, predominating the nation.”

It’s the phrase that has been heard so often this summer: systemic racism. It’s propelled by those who wield power, enhanced by those who ignore it, and it permeates our education systems.

“When one is kept ignorant, when one lacks the power, the knowledge being kept away and shaped, so it therefor shapes the history,” Shakes says. “History is shaped by those who have the power and make the definition so they can leave out whole segments of it.”

click to enlarge Two people stand near the railroad tracks across the street from a burning building during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The background shows a group of people standing and watching the building burn. - PHOTO COURTESY OF TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM

  • PHOTO COURTESY OF TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM
  • Two people stand near the railroad tracks across the street from a burning building during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The background shows a group of people standing and watching the building burn.

So here are the facts: Greenwood was a Black neighborhood within Tulsa, and grew to be so prosperous and successful, its streets lined with businesses, newspaper offices, churches and nightclubs, that it was called “the Negro Wall Street.” For two days, starting on May 31, 1921, Greenwood was set aflame by roving white mobs, with evidence that Tulsa city officials were the provocateurs. It’s estimated that as many as 300 Black residents of Greenwood died in the riots, which included people tossing bombs from airplanes.

“It was a reaffirmation of entrenched racism in this country, systemically, as well as just a whole feeling of a people to crush the aspirations of another part of our nation,” Shakes says. “We bombed our own people as Americans, if you look at it nationwide.”

The riot was supposedly triggered by a Black teenager’s encounter with a white woman in an elevator; the details are uncertain, ranging from an accidental bump to an assault. In his research, Shakes says he cannot find evidence that it even happened. It was perhaps a lie, to justify the attack.

“So that is story that, a story and a theme that’s been carried on in this country to perpetrate violence, to kill people, particularly African-American men,” Shakes says. “It was a theme that runs through, still runs, through today. So it helps us to look through some of the ills of our nation and to, hopefully, we try to learn something from it and move past. And raise that moral bar, and truthfully look at ourselves as a nation, and the values. And hopefully strive toward some truth and equity in the nation.”

A documentary on Baldwin, “I Am Not Your Negro,” was recently a virtual showing at The Little Theatre, and it can be found now on cable. Baldwin died in 1987, but his word still educates us where other sources fail.

“When one is kept ignorant, when one lacks the power, the knowledge being kept away and shaped, so it therefore shapes the history,” Shakes says. “History is shaped by those who have the power and make the definition so they can leave out whole segments if it.”

We’ve been here before. The call to ban automatic weapons after 26 people, including 20 kids five- and six-years-old, were murdered at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Or when the television news brings into your living room a video of a police officer shooting an unarmed Black man. There is rage, and call for change, that soon fades.

This summer, after the murder of George Floyd – and factor in the coronavirus pandemic as a part of this summer of distress – it feels like this call to social change has legs.

“Yes, I’m getting that feeling, I get that feeling, I have that feeling,” Shakes says. “I have that feeling, I was a part of that generation that raised a lot of concerns, back in the ’60s. I was coming into my, coming into myself, during the ’60s and the Civil Rights movement and we felt as though progress was being made, awareness was increasing and heightened. But now there is a wave, there’s a whole generation. I’m feeling like it’s really time, as you say, it has more legs than before.”

And vote in the Nov. 3 election to, as he says, “Put some teeth in that bite of change.”

Jeff Spevak is WXXI’s arts and life editor and reporter. He can be reached at jspevak@wxxi.org.

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Indy 10 Black Lives Matter seeks Black artists to complete street mural

The Indy 10 Black Lives Matter and other community organizers are seeking visual artists to complete a “Black Lives Matter” painting that the Indianapolis City-County Council approved in a resolution against racism on Monday night. 

Organizers will select one Black artist to complete each letter of the mural, which will run between the Madame Walker Legacy Center and the Indianapolis Urban League along Indiana Avenue. 

The Indianapolis Urban League and the Central Indiana Community Foundation will help fund the effort, which will occur on Aug. 1 and feature performances and food. 

Artists and community members unveil the finished Black Lives Matter! mural on June 19 in front of Cincinnati City Hall.

“We are thrilled to have Indy join the ranks of other cities around the country who have affirmed their position on today’s crises with beautiful artwork,” Malina Simone Jeffers, an organizer of the event, said in a statement. “Aug. 1st is a day for everyone to come together to celebrate, commune and watch artwork happen live on one of our historic avenues.”

The council passed a resolution in support of the mural on Monday, following weeks of protests in downtown Indianapolis against the killing of Black residents by police nationwide. 

The city’s Department of Public Works will help coordinate the effort. 

“I am excited to help amplify the work of the #BlackLivesMatter movement at the local level and to celebrate Black joy,” Stacia Murphy, another organizer of the effort, said in a statement. “However, it is the call for actual change that remains the focus and must not be overshadowed.”

Interested visual artists may email malinasimone@gmail.com. Interested performing artists may contact email Murphy at stacia.murphy@gmail.com. Interested volunteers may contact Danicia Monet at info@daniciamonet.co.

Call IndyStar reporter Amelia Pak-Harvey at 317-444-6175 or email her at apakharvey@indystar.com. Follow her on Twitter @AmeliaPakHarvey.

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For Paris Men’s Wear, the Next Stop Is California

We have seen the future of European fashion, and it is California.

Peering out from behind the curtain of a long lockdown, designers in Paris and Milan seemed unanticipatedly hopeful during the digital shows this past week. It was not so much that they were willing to forgo the inimitable theater of the fashion show as ready to embrace the accelerated alterations in everybody’s way of doing business forced on us by the pandemic.

Being indoors, onscreen, casual to the point of forgetting to put on our hard pants has affected us all, not least designers.

“I was doing all these Zoom meetings, and I didn’t have the garments I wanted,” Alessandro Sartori, the Zegna designer, said last week by phone from northern Italy. What he needed was lightweight things suited to the new exigencies of the workplace. What he had was summer linen jackets in what he called “vacation” colors.

But we are not on vacation, are we? Though we may be working 10 feet from our beds, we still need uniforms that draw a clear distinction between labor and leisure.

We need something along the lines of a formula the men’s wear consultant Josh Peskowitz once proposed as the basis for a distinctly California style when he ran Magasin, the influential (and lamented; it closed in 2019) Culver City store in that state.

Take a comfortable shirt, and trousers, and add something tailored — a bomber, a windbreaker, a chore coat. Or, swiping a cue from the guayabera, that most elegantly casual of masculine uniforms worn throughout the Caribbean basin, simplify to a mere two pieces. The result is something that, while as presentable as a suit, is not one.

The pursuit of the un-suit turned out to have allied designers whose names are seldom seen in the same sentence. When Miuccia Prada showed a loose, dropped-shoulder version of a chore coat or a boxy three-button jacket worn over a snug-fitting sweatshirt, she wasn’t just experimenting with designs intended to function as, the show notes said, “straightforward, unostentatious machines for living and tools for action and activity.”

She was also making unexpected common cause with Véronique Nichanian at Hermès, whose collection — shown in a film by the experimental director Cyril Teste that replicated the vibe of that electric moment backstage when models dress in first looks — was detailed at the achingly refined level of precision you’d expect from a venerable luxury goods house. (To wit: a ribbed sweater with all-but-invisible leather insets.)

Despite that, Ms. Nichanian’s collection remained easeful enough to hold its own with clothes from, say, Second/Layer, a young label in Los Angeles that has a lot to teach the old guard about how to dress a generation that has never worn a suit and tie.

ImageBerluti, spring 2021.

California felt like an uncredited collaborator in many collections. It was there in the gorgeously gnarly shirt prints that the Berluti designer Kris Van Assche extracted from his collaboration with Brian Rochefort, a sculptor who works with ceramics.

Mr. Rochefort, one of the legions of artists who have transplanted themselves to Los Angeles, traveled the world in the days before quarantines to visit volcanoes, caves and sinkholes. He was seeking inspiration for works that frequently resemble magma samples from the core of Planet Skittles.

California was there again in spirit in a Rick Owens show titled “Phlegethon,” after one of the five rivers that in Greek mythology flowed through the underworld. (Styx, Lethe, Cocytus and Acheron were the others, just so you know.)

The Owens presentation, shown on the model Tyrone Dylan Susman, ended up being something you might term health-goth. It fused the sort of funky layering and proportions you would spot on guys in any surf town along the state’s 840-mile coastline to elements of the designer Larry Legaspi’s futuristic death-metal costuming for Kiss.

“I basically make cutoffs and T-shirts,” Mr. Owens, a native of Portersville, Calif., said by phone before his presentation went live online last week. “European complexity meets California simplicity — that’s my gimmick.”

California was also a presence in an Isabel Marant collection shot at the Centre National de la Danse on the outskirts of Paris.

Watching the presentation of a video showing two young models racketing around within the corridors of this Brutalist structure felt like watching two pretty stoners who forgot where they left their car in Parking Structure No. 6 at the Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica. It was a true Reyner Banham moment transplanted to the present.

And the clothes were, like so much of what is being designed now, based on simple overlapping pieces that reflect the exigencies of a changing and often fickle climate. That and the fact that one of the few clear ways to mark the progression of a day, a week or a month anymore is by adding or subtracting a layer.

A critic for Vogue.com referred to the Marant collection as “L.A. meets the Marais.” Yet the low-slung trousers with rolled cuffs, the low-waist flight suits, the waxed poplin trenches and the fuzzy sweaters looked to be no more inherently French than the French Laundry, Thomas Keller’s storied restaurant. Which, as we all know, is just off Highway 29 in Yountville, Calif.

In a sense, one could even detect elements of wackadoodle California Republic optimism in an exceptionally exuberant JW Anderson collection. It was presented to critics as a boxed set of fabric samples and photos with the addition of pressed dried flowers, a paper mask of what looked like some rumbustious skate rat and little orange cards printed with New Age dithers: “Never Compromise,” “The Future is Unwritten,” “Keep Looking Up.”

There was something irrepressibly D.I.Y. about the collection, an effect that belied the masterful design and construction of patchwork coats slit high and flared like clown garments; oversize pockets ready made for boosting items from the department stores that no longer exist; and wallpaper prints and brocades that looked as if they were swiped from Joni Mitchell’s Laurel Canyon attic.

“A sentiment of youthful, freewheeling amusement composedly comes to the core,” read a line in Jonathan Anderson’s press notes. Even that utterance had an oddball SoCal cast to it, as though it had been cribbed from a Red Hot Chili Peppers lyric sheet.

If being sentenced to an indefinite term in Zoom jail has taught us anything, it is that in periods of prolonged exposure to tragedy we yearn for escape; often enough, that takes the form of silliness. What else are people doing trading bells for hula skirts and Froggie dresses on Animal Crossing New Horizons?

How else does one account for digital hordes of people picking up crochet hooks after a rainbow knit sweater from the JW Anderson spring men’s collection went viral on TikTok? Harry Styles wore it in rehearsal for a pre-lockdown performance on “Today.”

“I’ve never seen anything like it,” Mr. Anderson said. Because the nearly $1,500 hand-knit sweater is no longer available for sale, he posted the pattern online — an act of radical Etsy.

Even a gesture like his has roots you could trace, if you wished, to California groups like the utopian activists, the Diggers. Those early anticapitalists once staged semi-naked street theater happenings in the San Francisco of the 1960s, gave away food, and opened a bunch of Free Stores in Haight-Ashbury.

Is it a stretch to imagine that the stuff they offered gratis probably resembled Mr. Anderson’s irresistibly kooky granny sweater? I doubt it.

Credit…Jackie Nickerson

While Kim Jones’s show for Dior Men made reference to style gestures that likely originated on the West Coast (Teva-like sandals with socks, flap pocket shorts and berets worn Eldridge Cleaver-style), the collection for the most part paid homage to the tailoring traditions of the great couture house’s French founder.

For this outing Mr. Jones collaborated with Amoako Boafo, a Ghanaian artist he first met in Miami last year when a Dior men’s show was staged next door to the newly opened Rubell Museum, where Mr. Boafo was the resident artist.

In design terms, the connection is superficial to the point of indifference. Some of Mr. Boafo’s daubed portraits appear as prints. What is significant, though, is Mr. Boafo’s decision to forgo royalties from Dior in return for a donation to a cultural foundation the 36-year-old artist has set up in Accra, Ghana, just one element in an overdue cultural shift from appropriation to acknowledgment and homage.

The transformation, it is worth noting, is being spearheaded by Black artists like Mr. Boafo, Kehinde Wiley and Mickalene Thomas. In May, Mr. Boafo raised $190,000 from the online auction of his painting “Aurore Iradukunda,” with the proceeds going to the Museum of the African Diaspora, an institution whose goal is tracing the artistic and sociocultural threads of that forcible dispersion.

This singular museum stands not in New York or Paris or London, but right on gritty Mission Street in downtown San Francisco.

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Smithsonian Chief Says He Will Look Into Staff Complaint of Racism

Lonnie G. Bunch III, who last year became the first Black secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, said in an interview Wednesday that is he reviewing complaints in a letter sent by former employees and board members of its National Museum of African Art that described it as a bad place for Black employees.

“This is professional and personal — this is really important to me,” said Mr. Bunch, who was the founding director of the Smithsonian’s acclaimed National Museum of African American History and Culture, which recognizes the achievements of Black Americans and the struggle for civil rights as well as the horrors of slavery.

“What I will do is evaluate this, look into this, put my own fingerprints on it, understand exactly what’s gone on and try to get to the bottom of it,” Mr. Bunch continued. “There is no room for racism at the Smithsonian. Too many times, I was the only Black person in the room and I want to make sure that doesn’t happen anymore.”

In the unsigned letter, sent last Friday, people who identified themselves as former employees and trustees of the African art museum expressed “outrage” that it “has recruited, retained and promoted a predominantly White staff.”

Milton Jackson, a former educator at the museum who is Black, said he was among those who joined in sending the letter, which only identified themselves as “a group of concerned former employees and board members.” One of the signatories who asked not to be identified for fear of retribution said there were a total number of five people behind the letter.

Mr. Jackson said he had filed a complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 2016 about his experience of “discrimination and a hostile work environment” at the museum. “What’s happening there is wrong and needs to be corrected,” Mr. Jackson said in an interview.

Mr. Bunch said that he had become aware of concerns about racism at the museum before the letter and that the issue had partly inspired his decision to install Deborah L. Mack, an administrator — who is Black — with whom he had worked closely at the Museum of African American History, as interim director at the African art museum.

“I have the greatest confidence in her,” he said.

He said issues of equity would be top of mind as the Smithsonian searches for a new permanent director.

The letter noted that, for more than a decade, the museum’s “curatorial team has been exclusively White despite demonstrated interest amongst Black arts professionals and scholars in joining the institution.” Over the past five years, the letter added, more than 10 “former and current Black employees have reported or experienced incidents of racial bias, hostile verbal attacks, retaliation, terminations, micro- aggressions and degrading comments.”

The letter said the museum’s leadership had unfairly promoted white employees over Black ones and bullied Black employees who complained.

“I’m not going to explain something I did not create,” Mr. Bunch said. “My goal here is to make sure this is something we address. Every museum is made better if it’s got a diversity of opinions.”

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Allyship or stunt? Marc Quinn’s BLM statue divides art world

Marc Quinn’s statue of a Black Lives Matter protester has divided opinion in the art world with critics calling it a “an opportunistic stunt”, while Booker prize-winning author Bernardine Evaristo said it showed “initiative” and “active allyship”.

The artwork was installed in a “secret mission” on to the plinth which had housed a statue of slave trader Edward Colston until it was torn down and rolled into Bristol harbour during BLM protests in June.

Thomas J Price, who has been commissioned to create a sculpture dedicated to the Windrush Generation, accused Quinn of creating a “votive statue to appropriation”.

“Unfortunately, it feels like an opportunistic stunt,” Price told the Guardian. “I think it would be far more useful if white artists confronted ‘whiteness’ as opposed to using the lack of black representation in art to find relevance for themselves.”

Price added that he understood the positive responses to the piece, which was modelled on the figure of Jen Reid who was photographed protesting on top of the empty plinth, but he believed Quinn’s work ultimately failed.

“I can understand the initial positive reactions of those looking to address the lack of visible diversity within public sculpture and gestures towards allyship, but in my opinion Quinn has literally created the votive statue to appropriation.”

Evaristo said she admired Quinn for “making this amazing statue in collaboration with Jen Reid, funding it himself, and then installing it in the quiet early hours before he could be stopped”, and in so doing addressing the lack of public statues of black women in the UK.

“It’s a demonstrable commitment to the cause of Black Lives Matter in that it shows active allyship. Isn’t this what we need? Allies?” she said.

“It’s also a personal initiative and not a publicly-funded piece of art. For now, at least, we have another statue of a black woman on the streets of Britain. I expect there are less than handful in the whole country”

Dan Hicks, a professor of archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum who has written about the removal of Colston, said Quinn had shown the “pace and process” that UK communities require “if they are to transform the places they love, while keeping change in step with their values and wishes in this new fast-moving civil rights period”.

He said: “Who knows how long this statue will remain? For many that’s not the point – the value of this intervention is to underline the growing momentum and urgency that’s building around re-making as well as unmaking British cities’ heritage, museums, and historic built environments as anti-racist places.”

The mayor of Bristol, Marvin Rees, tweeted that the people of the city will decide the plinth’s future, and that, although he understands “people want expression”, the statue was put up without permission and will have to be removed.

Price said he feels the Quinn piece could “overshadow any permanent sculpture”, and therefore hinder “real progress during a moment of activism that should have showcased a black artist’s output, not that of a white cis man”.

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CBS Announces Multi-Year Content Partnership With NAACP

(CBS Local)– On Wednesday, CBS Television Studios and the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) announced an agreement on a multi-year partnership to develop and produce scripted, unscripted and documentary content.

The content will appear on linear television networks and streaming platforms. The announcement was made by George Cheeks, President and CEO of the CBS Entertainment Group and Derrick Johnson, President and CEO of the NAACP.

“An important way to diversify and grow our storytelling is to expand our horizons beyond the traditional studio-producer system,” said Cheeks. “There is no better partner than the NAACP – the preeminent civil rights organization in our country – to help us find, develop and tell these inclusive stories. “At the same time, this is a strategic opportunity for CBS to build upon as well as re-imagine our pipeline for existing and emerging creative talent.”

“In this moment of national awakening, the time has never been better to further tell stories of the African American experience,” said Johnson. “Programming and content have the power to shape perspectives and drive conversations around critical issues. This partnership with CBS allows us to bring compelling and important content to a broad audience.”

RELATED: ‘He Was A Congressman For All The People’: NAACP President Derrick Johnson On Rep. Elijah Cummings

As part of the agreement, CBS Television Studios’ creative leaders will work with the civil rights organization to establish a dedicated team of executives and infrastructure to acquire, develop and produce programming. The partnership will focus on producing premium content that expands the number of diverse voices contributing to an ever-evolving society, and by telling inclusive stories that increase the visibility and impact of Black artists in a growing media landscape.

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Paint dumped on Black Lives Matter mural in Cincinnati

Updated 7:32 am PDT, Wednesday, July 15, 2020

CINCINNATI (AP) — Police in Cincinnati are asking the public for help in identifying the man who poured red paint on the block-long “Black Lives Matter” mural in front of city hall.

Police have released surveillance video from early Sunday morning showing a man with his face covered at the scene. It appears that the man or someone else then drove over the wet paint, leaving tire tracks, news outlets reported.

The mural was officially dedicated June 19 amid protests across the nation against racial injustice and police brutality following the May 25 police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. It was created by teams of dozens of Black artists.

The “Black Lives Matter” mural in Cincinnati is one of several around the country to have been vandalized in recent weeks. New York City police on Tuesday released surveillance photos and video of a man seen Monday splashing red paint on the “Black Lives Matter” street mural in front of Trump Tower. Last week, two people were charged with hate crimes after defacing a city-sanctioned “Black Lives Matter” mural in Northern California.

Murals in Park City, Utah; Orlando, Florida; Charlotte, North Carolina, and outside Vermont’s statehouse have also been damaged.

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With striking Viola Davis ‘slave portrait’ imagery, Dario Calmese is Vanity Fair’s first black photographer

“Davis is right, about Black women — and men (and, for that matter, other people of color as well as LGBTQ+ subjects),” she wrote. “For most of the magazine’s history, a Black artist, athlete, or politician appearing on a regular monthly issue of ‘Vanity Fair was a rare occurrence.”

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Police: Vandal pours red paint on ‘Black Lives Matter’ mural in downtown Cincinnati

A vandal has poured red paint over the “Black Lives Matter” mural in downtown Cincinnati Tuesday, according to the Cincinnati Police Department.The red paint that was poured appears to be spread by a vehicle, as tire tracks of the paint now appear across the mural. Police said they are aware of the incident and are currently looking into it. Later Tuesday evening, after reviewing surveillance footage, Cincinnati police released a video of a person dumping the red paint on the mural. They also shared a photo of the person, who they said is a suspect in the case. The subject is seen wearing a black hat, a white shirt and a facial covering. Cincinnati police said the incident happened on Sunday at around 2:20 a.m.Protesters gathered at the mural after the incident chanting “Black Lives Matter” and they blocked the intersections with cars. Groups of people are attempting to clean the paint off, but have struggled to remove the paint. A few of the artists who worked on the piece are thinking of a plan to reconstruct the mural and return it to its original form. The mural spans an entire city block in front of City Hall and was officially dedicated on June 19.The mural was created by 17 teams of African American artists, one team handling each letter of the design. In total, about 60 to 70 artists were involved with the creation. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 513-352-3040. WLWT will update this story when more information is available.

A vandal has poured red paint over the “Black Lives Matter” mural in downtown Cincinnati Tuesday, according to the Cincinnati Police Department.

The red paint that was poured appears to be spread by a vehicle, as tire tracks of the paint now appear across the mural.

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Police said they are aware of the incident and are currently looking into it. Later Tuesday evening, after reviewing surveillance footage, Cincinnati police released a video of a person dumping the red paint on the mural. They also shared a photo of the person, who they said is a suspect in the case. The subject is seen wearing a black hat, a white shirt and a facial covering. Cincinnati police said the incident happened on Sunday at around 2:20 a.m.

Protesters gathered at the mural after the incident chanting “Black Lives Matter” and they blocked the intersections with cars. Groups of people are attempting to clean the paint off, but have struggled to remove the paint. A few of the artists who worked on the piece are thinking of a plan to reconstruct the mural and return it to its original form.

WLKY-TV

The mural spans an entire city block in front of City Hall and was officially dedicated on June 19.

The mural was created by 17 teams of African American artists, one team handling each letter of the design. In total, about 60 to 70 artists were involved with the creation.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 513-352-3040.

WLWT will update this story when more information is available.

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