AT WORLD WAR I CEREMONY, THE SONGBIRD OF TOGO REAPPEARS

Bella Bellow

Nov. 12, 2018 (GIN) – At a gathering of world leaders in the French capital of Paris, singer-songwriter Angelique Kidjo reprised an hypnotic work of ethereal beauty by a youthful West African singer. With a repertoire of just 17 songs, the diva, Bella Bellow, had won the hearts of presidents, accomplished artists and worldwide fans.

Kidjo’s choice of Blewu (“Patience”) “celebrated Peace and the memory of the fallen African soldiers of World War One in front of the leaders of this World under the Arc de Triomphe.” It was also the long-awaited encore for the “Togolese songbird” – Bella Bellow.

On the crest of international recognition, Bella, born Georgette Nafiatou Adjoavi Bellow, was just 27 when her life was cut short in a car crash Dec. 10, 1973. The driver of the car taking her to the Togo capital, Lome, claimed he fell asleep at the wheel.

Known only to a few today, her memory lives on among the French-speaking Togolese.

After receiving a scholarship from President Houphouet Boigny of the Ivory Coast, she studied music briefly in that country. At 19 she performed at the Festival of Black Arts in Dakar and was compared to the songstress of South Africa, Miriam Makeba.

After touring nearly a dozen African countries, she appeared in a festival in Tunis which led to invitations in Athens and Rio. She wowed the crowds in Bonn, Belgium, Guadeloupe and Guyana where they called her “la blueswoman d’Afrique”.

In Brazil, some 100,000 spectators filled the open-air Maracana Stadium for her Latin American debut.

Many artists offered to propel her career – she briefly partnered with Manu Dibango and recorded with him on several CDs. But Bellow continued to follow her dream. She worked on her own rhythms that combined Togolese folklore with modern beats. Among her signature tracks is Zelie, a ballad in the Kotokoli language of northern Togo about child brides married off to a man they have never seen.

Other successes of her discography included Senyé (My destiny), Blewu (Patience), Nye Dzi (My love), and Denyigba (My homeland). (All can be found on YouTube)

In 1999 the Togolese Postal Service issued a series of stamps with her portrait.

“She’s the African superstar you probably never heard of,” said the BBC’s music expert Ata Ahli Ahelba. “In Togo, she is not forgotten. She’s one of the best singers we ever had.”

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View From Trump’s America:

View From Trump’s America

Gary Abernathy

By Gary Abernathy The Washington Post

Published Nov. 23, 2018

 	Prez honoring Elvis? It's about time







When Elvis Presley was included among President Trump’s honorees for the Presidential Medal of Freedom, my first thought was, “It’s about time,” followed by the recognition that it would reignite the popular revisionist claim that Presley “appropriated” black culture and music, a nonsensical allegation that wasn’t shared by most of the black artists of the 1950s.


That sentiment is most succinctly summed up by Public Enemy’s Chuck D in the 1989 hit “Fight the Power,” which includes the line, “Elvis was a hero to most, but he never meant s— to me.” Obviously, Chuck D likewise means nothing to Presley, but the rapper’s follow-up line that Presley was “straight up racist” indicates a lack of awareness.


Presley was raised in poverty in the Tupelo, Miss., slums, side-by-side with African-Americans, and the rhythm and blues and black gospel that influenced him were as much his music as anyone’s. It was in his DNA. Far from making a calculated decision to capitalize on it, Presley performed it as naturally as he downed the fried peanut butter and banana sandwiches that his mother prepared as part of her poor family’s menu.


Presley, again merely by instinct, merged rhythm and blues with another genre he loved, country music – white music – to create a brand-new sound. Comparing the rhythm songs like “That’s All Right” as originally performed by Arthur Crudup with Presley’s version makes clear the creativity and distinction he brought to bear.




Rather than being hailed by critics as an innovator, Presley was initially reviled and shunned by polite society for performing “race music,” embraced only by teenagers of all races. Economics eventually forced the popular variety shows of the day, hosted by Milton Berle, Steve Allen and, most famously, Ed Sullivan, to relent and feature Presley on their airwaves. Once Presley knocked down the door, multiple black artists stepped through it, suddenly welcome on television and in concert halls.


It is noteworthy that Presley’s biggest hit was not a rock ‘n’ roll number. It was instead a song called “It’s Now or Never,” based on the operatic “O Sole Mio,” making it somewhat surprising that Presley hasn’t been accused of appropriating Italian music.


A recent documentary by Eugene Jarecki called “The King” examines Presley’s life as a metaphor for America in the age of Trump, with the director implying that the United States is in its “late Elvis” stage – self-indulgent, sick and dying. Among the criticisms from the many celebrities and musicians who are interviewed is that Presley never participated in the civil rights movement. He never marched for the cause.


In fact, Presley participated the only way he ever participated, through his music. Two of his biggest hits – both recorded against the wishes of his management – spoke out against social injustice. “If I Can Dream,” which Presley used to close his famous 1968 “comeback” TV special on the heels of the assassinations of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, had Presley dreaming “of a better land where all my brothers walk hand in hand.” He followed it up the following year with “In the Ghetto,” which told the story of “a poor little baby child” born in the ghetto who, by song’s end, is gunned down in the street, while “his mama cries.”


But what is particularly misleading about labeling Presley a thief of black music is that it ignores what truly makes him worthy of last Friday’s honor – his embrace and mastery of music in multiple forms, including rock, gospel, country, ballads and pop. His stage performances of the 1970s blended many genres into his unique vision of the universality of all people. He insisted on being backed up by the black, blues-tinged Sweet Inspirations side by side with the white, gospel melodies of the Imperials and, later, the Stamps Quartet.



During his later years, many of Presley’s contemporaries complained that he had abandoned his roots. They wanted him to come out with a five-piece band and perform “That’s All Right” and other early hits. But to do so would have made Presley nothing more than another oldies act.



While he always included a sampling of his early hits in his 1970s concerts, Presley focused more intently on contemporary music, covering a wide range from Simon and Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water” to Olivia Newton-John’s “Let Me Be There” to Tony Joe White’s “Polk Salad Annie.” After too many midcareer years of being forced to sing bad movie songs, by the 1970s Presley did what he wanted. If he liked it, he performed it, critics be damned.


By honoring Presley with the Medal of Freedom, Trump may have been playing to his Middle America base. But he also paid tribute to someone who arguably did as much to bridge the cultural and racial divide as anyone who ever lived, an impressive and unifying act from someone usually considered the most divisive of presidents.


(COMMENT, BELOW)


Abernathy is the former publisher and editor of the (Hillsboro, Ohio) Times-Gazette.



Previously:



11/03/18 The Kavanaugh accusations were just what the doctor ordered for Trump Country

08/21/18 America can’t stop watching

08/07/18 To the GOP’s base, Trump can do no wrong

07/31/18 Will the media’s anti-Trump fever ever break?

07/24/18 The media’s martyr complex

07/18/18 What got Trump into hot water regarding Putin was not what he said

06/14/18 One lib pol’s careful playing of the Trump card

06/13/18 Roseanne’s twisted tweet was horrible. Its consequences will be worse

05/08/18 America’s charitable instincts know no political divide

05/01/18 Millions of women voted for Trump, and didn’t need a man to convince them

04/05/18 ‘Roseanne’ is not pro-Trump; it’s pro-civility

01/09/18 Trump is right to bully America’s enemies

12/11/17 Abandon Trump? Oh, absolutely not now!

11/10/17 Please, Big Media, come visit us in Trump country

10/12/17 The left does not out-care the right

08/15/17 An honest conversation about race is not allowed

08/02/17 Why people like me still support Trump




RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

How the Freedom Wall strengthened and developed the WNY Urban Arts Collective

It’s been over a year since the Freedom Wall was officially unveiled as complete to the public. In addition to becoming a nationally recognized work, the Albright-Knox Public Art Initiative project helped grow the Western New York Urban Arts Collective. The completion of the wall was one made by many voices, but it didn’t start out that way. WBFO’s Nick Lippa looks back on how everything came together and the lasting impact it’s had on the region.

Vietnamese-American Chuck Tingley was originally supposed to complete the majority of the project before African-American artists like John Baker spoke up about the wall needing more representation.

“I remember telling someone at one point, it’s like coming in to your house, looking at your family album, and tell you who the pictures are in the album and what they’re about,” said Baker. “Originally that wasn’t part of the process. Aaron Ott, who is the curator of the Albright-Knox, did a good job of listening to the community and seeing what their desire was and what they were looking for, what they were hoping for. And they became a part of it. So it’s no longer the Albright-Knox wall. It’s not the artist’s wall, but it’s the community’s wall. Whenever you can do a project like that and of that magnitude and the community buys into it, it ends up being larger than you even anticipated it would be initially.”

When Ott chose Tingley to take on the bulk of the wall, he believed he found the person to create the image he desired.

“What I failed to recognize in that moment, in those early stages, was how that would be received as a denial of an opportunity for the African-American community,” Ott said. “It was in our public meetings where some of the community members… we had some pretty forthright conversations what it meant, not just to tell this story but to produce it visual. It wasn’t necessarily any one person’s story to tell, but certainly not mine alone to tell.”

What it led to was the discovery of more local talent. Edreys Wajed contributed, as well as Julia Bottoms, a young African-American artist in her twenties. Ott called Baker an elder statesmen of the project.

“The project is a much stronger project now having had, not just voices in the community, but the change that they wanted to see which was a work that dealt with their story told through their voice,” he said.

And since their voice has been heard, more minority artists have appeared. Baker is President of the Western New York Urban Arts Collective and said the group has more than doubled since the completion of the Freedom Wall drew more attention to it.

“All of sudden now we got a group of like 70 artists of color. And they are all getting opportunities now that were lacking before,” Baker said. “It used to be a point where we didn’t know where they were. We can’t find them. Where are they at in the community? Now we got a resource that people can reach out to.”

This leads to members receiving important professional development.

“How do you submit work to galleries? How do you fill out an application for a particular public arts project? How do you present your work? What’s the best medium to use? How do you do PR? So a lot of things that comes with being an artist that in most cases, you don’t know, your parents don’t know, not enough people in the community know because they don’t know that much about being an artists,” Baker said.

Jay Hawkins is a younger member of the group who found out about the collective through a Juneteenth event.

“We’re definitively growing and it’s diverse,” said Hawkins. “Senior artists. Younger artists. People that do sculpture. People that do photography. Different mediums. It’s just great to have all these people in one place that are all so different.”

The group currently meets bi-weekly at the Michigan Street Corridor—where they are now residency artists.

Ott said the history of this area is one reason why the corner of Michigan and East Ferry Street was the perfect spot for the Freedom Wall.

“That intersection is the northern entrance into the Michigan Street African-American heritage corridor. It’s right across the street from Bethel AME, the oldest black church in Buffalo. It is a block in from Main Street. So you have this natural divide between white and black in the city that people know, but we don’t necessarily talk about. It seemed like that content could come together in this space as a way for us to really bring people together in a dialogic way,” Ott said.

And it did for Hawkins, who didn’t know much about Bethel AME before the Freedom Wall.

“I learned about that church by being at events geared around the Freedom Wall,” said Hawkins. “The barbecues and meeting with the artists as they were working on them. Getting to see that process. I think that was amazing for the community to get to see it.”

With the collective continuing to grow in size, Baker believes more artists of color have an opportunity to pursue their passion professionally.

“We’ve been collaborating with a lot more organizations, a lot more galleries and museums, a lot more activities that are coming back, and a lot more possible opportunities that are coming back for artists,” he said.

Ott calls the Freedom Wall one of the most transformative projects of his entire career. Now he’s asking different questions as he takes new projects.

“Have we truly considered artists of color? Have we truly considered our community? Have we asked the right people? Have we asked enough questions? That’s something that my committee and I as an individual curator really pay attention to these days,” said Ott. “There was a lot of good faith generated at the end of the day with this project. I’m proud of that. It was difficult at the beginning, but I couldn’t have imagined how successful it would have been at the end, so I’m very happy.”

The inclusion of minority artists on just one important project looks to have opened the door for several more across the region.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

$90 Million Hockney Smashes Record for a Living Artist Amid Broad Market Shift

A celebrated and enigmatic painting of two men and a turquoise pool by David Hockney sold at Christie’s on Thursday night for $90.3 million with fees, shattering the auction record for a living artist and cementing a major broadening of tastes at the turbocharged top end of the market.

The price for the 1972 painting, “Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures),” easily surpassed the previous high of $58.4 million, held by Jeff Koons for one of his “Balloon Dog” sculptures.

The auction also produced new highs for works by two African-American artists, following highs for three African-American artists and a 42-year-old female painter at Sotheby’s the night before. Together the sales signaled a new inclusivity in the art world, driven by a generational shift toward artists who have been out of the mainstream and by stratospheric prices for more established names. That has forced collectors to expand their search for emerging names who might be undervalued.

The new demand for living artists, coupled with a dearth of masterworks for sale, has given greater exposure to nonwhite and female artists, with more museums exhibiting them and several of their works notching multimillion-dollar sales.

The Hockney painting is a different kind of trophy, by an openly gay artist about the emotional life of gay men. While the subject is hardly verboten in art, it is still rare to see same-sex themes in an artwork at this price point.

Image
David Hockney, in 2017, sitting on his royal blue deck, a frequent subject of his paintings.CreditNathanael Turner for The New York Times

“Diversity is exactly what you’re seeing in the auction rooms — museums have done a huge job in positioning these artists,” said Brett Gorvy, a prominent dealer who was formerly head of contemporary art at Christie’s. “There’s definitely an investment mentality — the market is always looking for new areas.”

Despite the snowy night, the salesroom at Christie’s Rockefeller Center headquarters was full and many in attendance raised their phones to film the sale of the Hockney. In addition to the usual heavy hitters in the crowd — collectors like Peter M. Brant, Martin Margulies and Alberto Mugrabi as well as dealers like Larry Gagosian and Christophe Van de Weghe — the actor Jake Gyllenhaal was in the third row, though he did not bid on the Hockney.

Offers quickly reached $70 million in a flurry of bidding among three people in the room and five calling in. The competition came down to two phone bidders and lasted nine minutes before the hammer came down to a round of applause at $80 million, or $90.3 million with fees. The buyer, as is customary, was not identified.

Mr. Hockney, a multitalented painter, draftsman and set designer who burst onto the British art scene in the early 1960s, has become one of the most popular living artists, though his work was not always taken seriously. His colors were too bright, his figures too realistic — the octogenarian Mr. Hockney even described his younger self as a “peripheral artist, really.”

But he is enjoying a commercial and reputational renaissance, thanks to three recent retrospectives, including one at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and another at Tate Britain that broke museum records. And at 81, though he has lost his hearing, Mr. Hockney continues to paint and experiment with digital art.

Auction prices for work by Mr. Hockney, who declined to be interviewed, had achieved a new benchmark in May, when his joyously colored 1990 landscape, “Pacific Coast Highway and Santa Monica,” sold for $28.5 million. It was only 2016 when his works broke the $10 million barrier.

The much-reproduced “Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures)” was one of the Met show’s most admired paintings. Yet, despite its familiarity, this sun-drenched hilltop scene of a pink-jacketed young man standing by a pool, gazing down at a swimmer submerged in the wobbly blueness below, remains one the artist’s most mysterious works.

David Hockney’s “Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures),” one of many paintings that drew from the artist’s life. His art acquaints us with his parents, his boyfriends, even his dachshunds.Creditvia Christie’s

The painting was executed during a three-month period of intense creativity after the artist broke up with his American art student lover, Peter Schlesinger. Many viewers assume that the scene is set in California, where Mr. Hockney has lived for decades. But the canvas was painted in London, based on photographs taken at a pool in the South of France. The standing figure is derived from photographs the artist took of Mr. Schlesinger in London’s Kensington Gardens.

Ian Alteveer, who curated the Met’s Hockney show, said he singled out the painting in the show’s catalog because it signaled a shift in the artist’s portrayal of water — from a distinct splash to a watery soaking of the canvas — and it marked the “culmination” of Hockney’s double portraits.

“It’s also a farewell to the relationship, which had come to an end,” Mr. Alteveer said, “and this grand statement about his interest in the psychology between two people that he’s been trying to capture.”

And where is the artist in the painting? Art critics have pointed out that there is little indication Mr. Schlesinger represents that title role. It has instead been suggested that the artist is Mr. Hockney himself, looking back at his lost lover, symbolically suggesting his own presence in the form of one of his iconic swimming pools.

The painting drew huge interest during the presale viewing in Christie’s Rockefeller Center showroom. “I’m only here for this,” said Post Villafane, 32, a young collector from Queens who viewed the painting on Wednesday. Mr. Villafane was not in the league of would-be bidders, but he was representative of a noticeably younger and more diverse crowd mingling with the usual middle-aged white art world insiders at this week’s presale showings. “The colors are so realistic,” he said. “They blend so well. Look how the paint shimmers. It’s beautiful.”

In reviewing the Met show, the New York Times art critic Roberta Smith described the artist’s “pictures of homosexual love and comradeship” from the early 1960s as “courageous,” given that they were made at a time when homosexuality was a criminal offense in Britain. “They should be a revelation to younger generations,” she added, “including painters using figurative styles to tell their own stories.”

The painting’s seller was not publicly revealed, but was widely reported to be Joe Lewis, a market-savvy British billionaire based in the Bahamas. He audaciously offered his Hockney without reserve, meaning he set no minimum price, a sign of how confident he was that it would sell for its estimate of $80 million. He bought the painting in 1995 from the entertainment magnate David Geffen.

Works from five African-American artists, two of them living, hit new highs at Christie’s and the Sotheby’s sale the night before. On Thursday night, “Cultural Exchange” by Robert Colescott, the first African-American to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale, sold for $912,500, nearly triple his previous record. “Lady Day II” by Sam Gilliam, the 84-year-old color field painter, sold for $2.2 million, almost twice his earlier high.

Jacob Lawrence’s “The Businessmen,” from 1947, sold for $6.2 million Wednesday, triple its high estimate of $2 million. Lawrence was best known for multipanel series about historical figures — Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass — and the Great Migration.CreditThe Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation, Seattle/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; via Sotheby’s

On Wednesday, Jacob Lawrence’s 1947 The Businessmen” — featuring five African-American subjects in black suits with briefcases and paperwork — sold for $6.2 million, triple its high estimate of $2 million. Jack Whitten’s 1985 “Ancient Mentor I,” in which he pressed wet acrylic paint onto a mesh grate, sold for $2.2 million, nearly double the high estimate. And Henry Taylor’s 2004 canvas “I’ll Put a Spell on Yousold for $975,000, nearly five times the high estimate.

Nine bidders competed at Sotheby’s for “Her Arms,” a monumental 2003 painting by Dana Schutz, whose painting “Open Casket” depicting Emmett Till in his coffin caused a cultural furor at last year’s Whitney Biennial. “Her Arms,” which depicts a woman with a guitar, sold for $795,000, nearly four times the high estimate of $200,000.

Dana Schutz’s painting “Her Arms,” from 2003, sold for $795,000 with fees Wednesday.Creditvia Christie’s

The $21.1 million Sean Combs paid in May for Kerry James Marshall’s 1997 painting “Past Times” — an auction high for any work by a living African-American artist — heralded this shift in collecting sensibility. So, too, did the $12.4 million bid last month in London for Jenny Saville’s “Propped,” raising the bar for living female artists at auction.

Henry Taylor’s “I’ll Put a Spell on You” (2004) sold for $975,000 with fees on Wednesday.Creditvia Sotheby’s

While none of the newly appreciated living artists will directly benefit from the recent sales, they may be able to command higher prices for any later works they sell.

“My mama always said I was worth something,” Mr. Taylor, 60, said in a telephone interview. “There are a lot of artists who have gone unnoticed and are getting recognition, and that’s a good thing.”

In that way, Mr. Taylor said, the auction was gratifying. “All this posthumous love ain’t no good,” he said. “Give me my flowers when I’m here.”

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Buy Black, Build Black, Support Black at Shop Black Friday Event

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SOUTH SACRAMENTO – Sacramento entrepreneurs are urging local shoppers to forgo the pushing and shoving typically associated with the day after Thanksgiving in favor of a more pleasant shopping experience.

The African Marketplace hosts Shop Black Friday on one of the busiest shopping days of the year, November 23. Shop Black Friday Sacramento is being held at 2251 Florin Road from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Hosted by the Black Friday Coalition, the event is being billed as an opportunity to “Buy Black, Build Black, Support Black.”

Vendors will be on hand offering local shoppers a chance to fulfill their holiday list. whether it’s Black art, custom jewelry or handmade soaps, there will be a variety of gifts for everyone. Organizer have also planned activities throughout the day to encourage family and community togetherness. Including a line dancing class with Lettuce Walker at 4:00 p.m. and a Paint & Sip event “after hours” at 6:00 p.m. featuring Sojourner Truth Museum founder and artist Shanna McDaniel and live music by saxophonist Shawn Rayford.

For more, visit www.eventbrite.com or call (916) 542-8927.
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By Genoa Barrow
OBSERVER Senior Staff Writer

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Trump honoring Elvis? It’s about time.

Contributing columnist

November 21 at 9:08 AM

Gary Abernathy, a contributing columnist for The Post, is a freelance writer and former newspaper editor based in Hillsboro, Ohio.

When Elvis Presley was included among President Trump’s honorees for the Presidential Medal of Freedom, my first thought was, “It’s about time,” followed by the recognition that it would reignite the popular revisionist claim that Presley “appropriated” black culture and music, a nonsensical allegation that wasn’t shared by most of the black artists of the 1950s.

That sentiment is most succinctly summed up by Public Enemy’s Chuck D in the 1989 hit “Fight the Power,” which includes the line, “Elvis was a hero to most, but he never meant s— to me.” Obviously, Chuck D likewise means nothing to Presley, but the rapper’s follow-up line that Presley was “straight up racist” indicates a lack of awareness.

Presley was raised in poverty in the Tupelo, Miss., slums, side-by-side with African Americans, and the rhythm and blues and black gospel that influenced him were as much his music as anyone’s. It was in his DNA. Far from making a calculated decision to capitalize on it, Presley performed it as naturally as he downed the fried peanut butter and banana sandwiches that his mother prepared as part of her poor family’s menu.

Presley, again merely by instinct, merged rhythm and blues with another genre he loved, country music — white music — to create a brand-new sound. Comparing the rhythm songs like “That’s Alright, Mama” as originally performed by Arthur Crudup with Presley’s version makes clear the creativity and distinction he brought to bear.

Rather than being hailed by critics as an innovator, Presley was initially reviled and shunned by polite society for performing “race music,” embraced only by teenagers of all races. Economics eventually forced the popular variety shows of the day, hosted by Milton Berle, Steve Allen and, most famously, Ed Sullivan, to relent and feature Presley on their airwaves. Once Presley knocked down the door, multiple black artists stepped through it, suddenly welcome on television and in concert halls.

It is noteworthy that Presley’s biggest hit was not a rock-and-roll number. It was instead a song called “It’s Now or Never,” based on the operatic “O Sole Mio,” making it somewhat surprising that Presley hasn’t been accused of appropriating Italian music.

A recent documentary by Eugene Jarecki called “The King” examines Presley’s life as a metaphor for America in the age of Trump, with the director implying the United States is in its “late Elvis” stage — self-indulgent, sick and dying. Among the criticisms from the many celebrities and musicians who are interviewed is that Presley never participated in the civil rights movement. He never marched for the cause.

In fact, Presley participated the only way he ever participated, through his music. Two of his biggest hits — both recorded against the wishes of his management — spoke out against social injustice. “If I Can Dream,” which Presley used to close his famous 1968 “comeback” TV special on the heels of the assassinations of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, had Presley dreaming “of a better land where all my brothers walk hand in hand.” He followed it up the following year with “In the Ghetto,” which told the story of “a poor little baby child” born in the ghetto who, by song’s end, is gunned down in the street, while “his mama cries.”

But what is particularly misleading about labeling Presley a thief of black music is that it ignores what truly makes him worthy of last Friday’s honor — his embrace and mastery of music in multiple forms, including rock, gospel, country, ballads and pop. His stage performances of the 1970s blended many genres into his unique vision of the universality of all people. He insisted on being backed up by the black, blues-tinged Sweet Inspirations side by side with the white, gospel melodies of the Imperials and, later, the Stamps Quartet.

During his later years, many of Presley’s contemporaries complained that he had abandoned his roots. They wanted him to come out with a five-piece band and perform “That’s Alright, Mama” and other early hits. But to do so would have made Presley nothing more than another oldies act.

While he always included a sampling of his early hits in his 1970s concerts, Presley focused more intently on contemporary music, covering everything from Simon and Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water” to Olivia Newton-John’s “Let Me Be There” to Tony Joe White’s “Polk Salad Annie.” After too many mid-career years of being forced to sing bad movie songs, by the 1970s Presley did what he wanted. If he liked it, he performed it, critics be damned.

By honoring Presley with the Medal of Freedom, Trump may have been playing to his Middle America base. But he also paid tribute to someone who arguably did as much to bridge the cultural and racial divide as anyone who ever lived, an impressive and unifying act from someone usually considered the most divisive of presidents. 

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

‘It is our story:’ Why a contest inspired by Viola Desmond was cut short

The owner of the former New Glasgow, N.S., theatre where Viola Desmond stood up to segregation is rethinking a contest inspired by the civil rights pioneer after being accused of cultural appropriation.

MacGillivray Injury and Insurance Law planned to display artwork on the outside of what used to be the Roseland Theatre where, in 1946, Desmond refused to give up her seat in the whites-only section.

On Monday, Desmond was immortalized on the $10 bill, the first Canadian woman to receive the honour.

The firm asked artists from across Atlantic Canada to submit work as part of its “protest art contest” and people could vote online for their favourites. The firm also advertised the contest on billboards and bus ads. 

None of this sat well with Angee Bowden, who calls the contest “reckless” and done without proper consultation with the black community.

Angee Bowden said she heard from many members of Nova Scotia’s black communities who were concerned about the art contest. (Mairin Prentiss/CBC)

“All we are trying to say is it is our story. Include us in the telling of it. That’s not that difficult to understand,” said Bowden, who grew up in New Glasgow and calls herself a social justice advocate. 

Bowden said she suggested early on that the firm instead ask black artists to collaborate on what story needed to be told and how to do it before putting a public call out.

She takes issue with people, many of whom may not be African-Nova Scotian, interpreting the racism that Desmond had to endure. 

“It had sort of a historic feel to us where our story is being told by someone else and excludes the custodians of that pain,” she said.

Bowden sent a letter outlining her concerns to the firm’s founding partner, Jamie MacGillivray, in October.

The contest asked artists to create work inspired by Viola Desmond’s act of protest in 1946 when she refused to leave the whites-only section of the Roseland Theatre. (Communications Nova Scotia/Bank of Canada/Flickr)

He responded by cancelling the contest’s public art shows and forming a committee to figure out how to commemorate Desmond on the building. 

“We called the contest to an early close because hurting people was the opposite of what we wanted to do, no matter how small the number,” MacGillivray​ wrote in an email to CBC News.

Our story is being told by someone else and excludes the custodians of that pain.– Angee Bowden

MacGillivray said the firm received more than 500 submissions, and the cash prizes totalling $20,000 will still be handed out even if the pieces don’t end up on the building. 

He declined to be interviewed, saying he believes it’s time for “others to have their voice heard, not mine.”

“Hopefully this process, although painful at times, will result in something that Viola Desmond would be proud of,” MacGillivray​ wrote.

Wanda Robson, Desmond’s sister, was in support of the contest, and Bowden said she’s glad MacGillivray​ included her in the process.

But she doesn’t know why other voices were left out.

Bowden said the backlash to the contest should be a reminder that 1946 wasn’t that long ago. Given recent allegations of a racially motivated attack in Pictou County, Bowden said it’s important for people to first listen to members of the black community. 

“It’s dangerous to tout that we’ve arrived, when in fact the custodians of that pain are at their kitchen tables saying we haven’t arrived,” she said.

‘Viola commemorative committee’ formed

While the art shows have been cancelled, it’s still possible that some of the submissions will end up displayed on the former theatre.

The firm has formed a committee, chaired by Henderson Paris, a former town councillor and long-time resident, that will decide how to commemorate Desmond.

The law firm bought the former Roseland Theatre two years ago. (Submitted by Alexis MacDonald)

Paris said committee members are still being chosen, and it’s too soon to say what pieces, if any, will hang on the building.

Still, he believes the contest, and the conversations it forced people to have, are worthwhile. 

“We envision something wonderful happening, something that will be educational in nature and do honour to Viola Desmond, a pioneer who stood up and stepped up and helped make a change,” he said. 

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

Black Nativity by Langston Hughes 2018 Returns to the Marcus Center’s Wilson Theater at Vogel Hall

MILWAUKEE, WI  – Black Nativity by Langston Hughes will run December 7-16 with a special Community Night preview performance on Thursday, December 6 at the Marcus Center’s Wilson Theater in Vogel Hall.

Directed by Bronzeville Arts Ensemble’s co-founder Malkia Stampley, the production features returning music director/arranger, Antoine Reynolds and choreography by Daync Studio’s founder Christopher Gilbert.  Black Nativity by Langston Hughes is a Black Arts MKE production in collaboration with the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts.  This presentation is supported by Bader Philanthropies, Greater Milwaukee Foundation, Johnson Controls Foundation, United Performing Arts Fund, VISIT Milwaukee, and We Energies Foundation.

Each year Stampley inspires social change through acknowledgement of a current community issue through performance prologue and post-performance audience engagement.  “I allow a social issue that affects Milwaukee and the national community to be a guide as I stage the production. I like to think of it as a backdrop, a seed that will grow on its own once you leave the stage” says Stampley.  She adds, “Our production takes place today, in a city like Milwaukee, so I also ask myself every year ‘is this relevant?’ In 2016, I was struck by the unrest in Sherman Park. In 2017, the killing of unarmed Black men still dominated my heart as well as the controversy of Colin Kaepernick’s kneeling and dismissal from the professional game of football. There are so many issues that touch my heart on a daily basis so it’s not always an easy task.”

“Bronzeville Arts Ensemble, a member of Black Arts MKE, tackles the role of presenting producer,” says the show’s Executive Producer Barbara Wanzo.  This year marks our fourth year of Black Nativity by Langston Hughes and features many exciting show updates including new set design tagged by talented local youth artists from TRUE Skool.  We are fortunate to have a knock out cast and team each year and this year is no different.

Some of Milwaukee’s favorite performers return this year as well as some joining Black Nativity by Langston Hughes for the first time. Dimonte Henning (NBC’s Chicago PD, Milwaukee Rep’s Guys and Dolls, First Stage’s The Wiz, Forward Theater’s Skeleton Crew, Milwaukee Chamber’s Deathtrap) joins the cast as Joseph and Natalie Harris (national touring gospel recording artist, teaching artist, and three years of Black Nativity in Alabama) returns this year as Mary. Returning cast members include Tasha McCoy, Camille Hunt (singing the show stopping number “Rise Up Shepherd” as the Angel of the Lord), Michaela Usher, Shawn Holmes and youth ensemble members Nafia Johnson, Zephaniah Ponder and Carolyn Stampley. Additional new members include Raven Dockery, Brandite Reed, Justin Lee and youth ensemble members Raniyah Edwards, Ashlyn Woodley and Naima Gaines.

“The Marcus Center for the Performing Arts understands the importance of African American arts in our community for the ENTIRE community” says Paul Mathews.  Mathews, President and CEO of the Marcus Center. “As the community’s performing arts center, we strive for inclusiveness.  It is our vision at the Marcus Center to provide the setting for outstanding arts experiences like Black Nativity by Langston Hughes for all of Milwaukee’s cultures.

Black Nativity by Langston Hughes opens Friday, December 7 through Sunday, December 16.  Special pricing will be available for Community Night on December 6.  Tickets are now on sale and can be purchased in person at the Marcus Center Box Office at 929 North Water Street, Downtown Milwaukee, by phone at 414-273-7206 or online at https://www.marcuscenter.org/show/black-nativity-2018/
or Ticketmaster.com.   Groups of 10 or more should call Group Sales at 414-273-7121, x210 or x213. Special church group pricing is also available.  For more information, visit MarcusCenter.org.

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ABOUT BRONZEVILLE ARTS ENSEMBLE

Founded in 2013, Bronzeville Arts Ensemble strives to illuminate the black experience in America by developing and creating theater while also providing artistic and educational programming opportunities, collaborating with the local and national community, inspiring healing and positive social change.

 

ABOUT BLACK ARTS MKE

We’re committed to increasing the availability and quality of African American arts.  We collaborate with local artists and arts organizations to bring renowned and original performance arts works by African American authors, playwrights, poets, musicians, and composers to our community.  Our arts education outreach and community programs serve over 8,850 at-risk youth and their families.  Presented by member group Bronzeville Arts Ensemble, our annual signature event Black Nativity by Langston Hughes is a new holiday musical favorite in Milwaukee.  Black Arts MKE is a proud Affiliate Member of United Performing Arts Fund (UPAF) and an in-residence group at the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts.  Black Arts MKE is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation.

ABOUT THE MARCUS CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Established in 1969, the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts is the premier performing arts community gathering space in Southeastern Wisconsin. As the Marcus Center moves into its 49th year, it continues to build bridges between diverse members of our community through high-quality arts entertainment in the region and the state. The touring Broadway series, sponsored by Associated Bank, is recognized as bringing the best of Broadway entertainment to Milwaukee for the past 20 years and provides opportunities to educate, entertain and engage audiences. The Marcus Center is also the home to the Milwaukee Symphony, Milwaukee Ballet, Florentine Opera, First Stage plus a variety of other important community and family events throughout the year. For more information about events visit the Marcus Center website at www.MarcusCenter.org. The Marcus Center is a private non-profit 501(c) 3 corporation and is a dedicated veterans memorial in Milwaukee.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

5 The dazzling Harlem Renaissance that flowered in New York nearly a century ago


Norman Lewis. “Jumping Jive,” 1942, Oil on canvas. (Michael Rosenfeld Gallery)
November 19 at 1:39 PM

The Harlem Renaissance kicked off after a summer of bloody race-related riots in 1919. It flourished in the 1920s and ’30s, a mere half-century after the abolition of slavery, amid a nationwide revival of the Ku Klux Klan.

The context suggests immediately how absurd it would be to divorce the Harlem Renaissance from questions of sociology and — most obviously — race. And yet it’s worth insisting that what makes the Harlem Renaissance special — what makes it such a shining moment in American history — is its legacy of literary, artistic and musical brilliance.

That’s why it matters that “I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100,” a wonderful show at the Columbus Museum of Art, is named for a poem by Langston Hughes. (“Besides,” the poem concludes, “they’ll see how beautiful I am/ And be ashamed,–/ I, too, am America.”)


Palmer Hayden. “The Subway,” about 1930. Oil on canvas. (New York State Office of General Services/Harlem Art Collection)

Horace Pippin. “Self-Portrait,” 1941. Oil on canvas board. (Collection Albright Knox Art Gallery)

That’s why it matters that the first works in the show are portraits of artists and writers such as Zora Neale Hurston, Aaron Douglas and W.E.B. Du Bois: They were among the bold, creative spirits who made the Harlem Renaissance happen.

And that’s why it matters that, displayed throughout the exhibition, are dozens of original editions of the magazines and books they created. Among them: “Harlem: Mecca of the New Negro,” the March 1925 issue of Survey Graphic magazine compiled by Alaine Locke; and “The New Negro,” the expanded anthology it spawned later that year. No publications did more to shape what became known as the Harlem Renaissance.

“I, Too, Sing America” was put together by Wil Haygood, who, at 64, is a first-time curator. He’s been busy at other things: The author of seven nonfiction books (including biographies of several figures linked to the Harlem Renaissance), he was born and raised in Columbus in the historically African American district of King-Lincoln Bronzeville, adjacent to the Columbus Museum of Art.


Augusta Savage. “Gamin,” c. 1930. Painted plaster. (The John and Susan Horseman Collection of American Art/Columbus Museum of Art)

Haygood has worked for both the Boston Globe and The Washington Post (his 2008 Post story about Eugene Allen, an African American who worked in the White House under eight presidents, was made into the film “The Butler,” starring Oprah Winfrey, Forest Whitaker and Cuba Gooding Jr.) His journalistic background shows: The catalogue, focused on facts, personalities, and events, is a pleasure to read.

What’s more, he and his fellow curators, all from the Columbus Museum of Art, avoid the pitfalls the Metropolitan Museum of Art fell into in 1969 when it mounted “Harlem on my Mind.” That show, intended as a progressive-minded celebration of the black community, was a fiasco for reasons hard to sum up in a sentence. (Susan E. Cahan offers a riveting account in “Mounting Frustration: The Art Museum in the Age of Black Power.”)

Suffice it to say that it was a show about the culture of Harlem that failed to include original art by African American artists; that it was organized by a well-meaning but overly controlling white curator, Allon Schoener, who tried to deploy respected African Americans for window-dressing; and that the catalogue’s introduction, by a 17-year-old high school student, contained an extraordinary claim linking African Americans with anti-Semitism.

The Met show broke attendance records. Many people loved it. But in terms of PR, everything that could go wrong, did go wrong. Artists picketed the show. Art critics condemned the Met’s move away from art toward leftist sociology. The American Jewish Congress took out a full-page ad in the New York Times condemning the Met.

In Columbus, things have been done differently. The artists and writers of the Harlem Renaissance are front and center. Their achievements are not celebrated just in the abstract; they are on the walls and on pages bound between beautiful book covers.

We see in the first galleries, for instance, Edwin Augustus Harleston’s 1930 portrait of Aaron Douglas, palette and brushes in hand. “I create,” it calmly announces. Nearby, offered as proof, are Douglas’s stylized images in gouache of Harlem jazz clubs; his woodblock prints illustrating a Eugene O’Neill play; his dusk jacket illustration for James Weldon Johnson’s “God’s Trombones”; and his cover designs both for FIRE!!, a single-issue magazine of lasting impact; and the May 1928 issue of The Crisis, the most widely read and distributed magazine of the Harlem Renaissance.

The Crisis was (and still is) put out by the NAACP. In operation since 1910, it was edited until 1933 by Du Bois, whose 1925 portrait, by the German artist Winold Reiss, we see in the second gallery.

Reiss was a big influence on Douglas. The German’s pastel portraits were commissioned by Locke for “Harlem: Mecca of the New Negro.” Among them was a double portrait of two young public school teachers that is as freshly beautiful today as it was confronting to racist mind-sets then. (At a reception for Reiss, one man declared that the two teachers would have scared him had he encountered them on the street. Galleries wouldn’t show them, Anastasia Kinigopoulo writes in the catalogue, “out of fear they would attract black clientele.”)


Winold Reiss. “Harlem Girl,” about 1925. Pencil, charcoal and pastels on heavy illustration board (Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Missouri/Columbus Museum of Art)

Sargent Johnson. “Mask of a Girl,” 1925. Copper repoussé with gilding. (Collection of the Newark Museum/Columbus Museum of Art)

Reiss also made a study, in three-quarter profile, called simply “Harlem Girl,” with affinities to a nearby face, “Mask of a Girl,” sculpted by Sargent Claude Johnson. Made from hammered copper and enhanced with gilding on the girl’s braided hair, Johnson’s small piece came out of an impulse he articulated 10 years later: He wanted, he said, to show “the natural beauty and dignity in that characteristic lip and that characteristic hair, bearing, and manner; and I wish to show that beauty not so much to the white man as to the Negro himself.”

Some might be embarrassed by such sentiments today, taking their premise for granted. But, at the time, few people could. “It is fair to say,” wrote Arnold Rampersad, a biographer of both Hughes and Ralph Ellison, in his introduction to a 1992 edition of Locke’s “The New Negro,” “that, in the face of racial ‘science,’ most of the [black] contributors to the volume accepted the notion of black racial and cultural inferiority compared to the highest standards of European civilization.”

Yet these writers and artists also believed passionately that things were changing. They believed they were part of a transformation that would lead to political agency and a broad-based cultural flourishing.

And so it did. The Harlem Renaissance began soon after 200,000 black soldiers returned from Europe at the end of World War I. The U.S. Army was still segregated. Most black soldiers had served as support troops. But some African American regiments — most notably the 369th Infantry Regiment, the so-called “Harlem Hellfighters” — fought and were recognized for their bravery.

In France, they had been treated with a level of respect they were rarely afforded at home. Now, returning victorious, they demanded equality with renewed urgency.

Meanwhile, during the four years of the war in Europe, half a million blacks had left the American South for northern cities such as Chicago, Detroit, Columbus, Cleveland and New York, where they settled in Harlem. Racial tensions were inflamed both in the South, whose white farm owners resented the departure of cheap black labor, and in the North, where whites felt uneasy about the changing face of their cities.

Lynchings remained common in the South, but attempts to pass an anti-lynching bill in Congress were repeatedly frustrated. White racial supremacy, widely accepted, was reinforced by influential books and movies, including D.W. Griffith’s landmark film, “Birth of a Nation,” based on “The Clansman,” by Thomas Dixon, Jr., a close friend of President Woodrow Wilson. Labor disputes increased in frequency. And in summer 1919 — known as the Red Summer — bloody confrontations between blacks and whites broke out across the nation.

How did a so-called “renaissance” — what one of its leading figures, Arna Bontemps compared to “a foretaste of paradise” — emerge from so much strife? Sociology explains only so much. It cannot plumb the deeper reasons for creative flourishing, which might have less to do with statistics and social movements than with friendships, rivalries, love affairs and the strange sparks sent off by souls in turmoil. “A blue haze descended at night,” Bontemps wrote, “and with it strings of fairy lights on the broad avenues.”


Jacob Lawrence. “The Long Stretch,” 1949. (Bill and Holly Marklyn)

“I, Too, Sing America” tells the story of the central figures in the Harlem Renaissance. But it also takes a wider look at the movement’s legacy. It shows great art made in the ’40s and ’50s, for instance, by Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden and Norman Lewis. All three were stars of the next generation, but they were taught by the sculptor Augusta Savage, a central figure in the Harlem Renaissance.

The show takes us beyond Harlem, too. Allan Rohan Crite painted black life in Boston, but very much under the influence of Harlem Renaissance figures. Several of his pictures are here, along with sculptures by Meta Fuller, who studied with Rodin in Paris and was close to Du Bois and Savage but who never lived in Harlem.

Accusations of intellectual snobbery have long hovered around the Harlem Renaissance. Locke was the first black Rhodes scholar, a graduate of Harvard and Oxford, and a philosopher who had studied in Paris and Berlin. Du Bois, despite his misguided impatience with art that was not overtly propagandistic, could seem cautious compared with Garvey, whose more radical, Pan-African rhetoric and entrepreneurial energies were also part of the story of Harlem in the 1920s.

Locke may have papered over some sociopolitical realities in favor of vaguer conjectures in the realm of culture. But what his energies helped make possible should not be underestimated: a truthful, respectful and authentic depiction of black humanity and recognition for burgeoning black creative brilliance. The message — essentially, that black culture matters — should never have been required; but it was as important then as it remains today.

I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100, through Jan. 20, at the Columbus Museum of Art, 480 E. Broad St., Columbus, Ohio. columbusmuseum.org.

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

A story of freedom, ‘Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes’ to screen at Sound Unseen

The Sound Unseen films-on-music festival is under way, and as always, it covers various genres, extremes, and intersections of music and culture. Kudos to Jim Brunzell and Rich Gill for keeping this niche party humming.

“Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes,” which screens on Sunday afternoon, is a must-see if you love John Coltrane … or Kendrick Lamar. If you believe Alfred Lion and Francis Wolff were the greatest record producers of all time … or you keep close track of the very interesting young hip-hop producer Terrace Martin. And especially if you think jazz is dead.

As Martin says in the film, “Blue Note is the past, present and the future. It’s always doing something different. It’s always turning on the next generation to something that could change their life.”

Swiss filmmaker Sophie Huber’s feature-length documentary chronicles the birth, development, near death and phoenix-like rise of the most important label in the history of jazz. Let’s just say in the history of American music, because jazz is American music. This tale hasn’t been told since German filmmaker Julian Benedikt’s Peabody-winning “Blue Note: A Story of Modern Jazz” in 1997, and a lot has happened in the 20 years since.

Founded in 1939 by friends and passionate jazz fans Alfred Lion and Francis Wolff, two German Jews fleeing the Nazis, Blue Note was never about signing stars, making money or pumping out hit records. Best-sellers were accidents. Blue Note was about freedom: creative freedom, freedom of expression, freedom for the artists to reflect their experience, respond to their times (including the civil rights movement), push their own boundaries and speak their truth.

That’s what Lion and Wolff wanted to hear. They gave us John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell, Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Art Blakey, and the list goes on and on – nearly 1,000 records, many iconic, all lovingly recorded and produced, all documented in notebooks by Lion and photographs by Wolff.

Members of the Blue Note All-Stars

Mira Film

Members of the Blue Note All-Stars from left: tenor saxophonist Marcus Strickland, jazz legend Wayne Shorter (who guested on one track) and trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire.

Huber smartly starts and ends her film with a supergroup of today’s young Blue Note artists: trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, keyboardist Robert Glasper, bassist Derrick Hodge, guitarist Lionel Loueke, drummer Kendrick Scott and tenor saxophonist Marcus Strickland. Glasper signed with Blue Note in 2004, the others during the 2010s. As the Blue Note All-Stars, they met to record what would be their Sept. 2017 release, “Our Point of View.”

Also in the studio, contributing one track, were jazz legends Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock. Shorter first recorded with Blue Note in 1959; Hancock signed on in 1961. Huber shows us the label’s past, present and future, living and breathing and making music together.

With access to all things Blue Note, Huber has made a satisfying, illuminating film that squeezes 80 years of history and music into just under 90 minutes. New and archival interviews, performance footage, photographs, studio banter, and those instantly recognizable album covers come together in a cohesive whole with a stellar soundtrack.

The long, incredibly fruitful, warm and respectful collaboration between two white German Jewish jazz afficionados and the musicians they signed and recorded, who were almost all African-Americans, stands in sharp contrast to the xenophobia and racism that have always plagued us and are on the rise today. From the start, Blue Note made sure black artists were heard. That continues today, with commitment and without question.

What’s clear from the film is that jazz is very much alive, and it stays alive by changing while staying rooted in its own deep, rich history. Jazz is innovator, borrower and lender. It makes new music. It takes Disney tunes, Broadway hits and songs by Radiohead and welcomes them into the jazz fold. It shares licks, sensibilities and beats with hip-hop. Kendrick Lamar’s platinum-selling, Grammy-winning “To Pimp a Butterfly” is filled with jazz influences and features jazz musicians (Glasper, Akinmusire). Terrace Martin describes Lamar as “a jazz musician by default. It’s in his DNA.”

In one of our favorite stories from “Beyond the Notes,” Bruce Lundvall (Blue Note’s CEO from 1984-2010) tells of hearing about a London-based jazz/hip-hop fusion group that wanted to sample Herbie Hancock’s 1995 Blue Note release “Cantaloupe Island.” When they asked Lundvall, “Are you going to stop us?” Lundvall replied, “No, you can sample the entire Blue Note catalog. Let’s make an album.”

Miles Davis performing in the Blue Note studios.

Copyright Mosaic Records/Michael Cuscuna

Miles Davis performing in the Blue Note studios.

Us3’s “Hand on the Torch,” with its hit song “Cantaloop,” sold millions of copies. Lundvall also signed a very young and unknown Norah Jones to her first recording contract. Her first Blue Note album, “Come Away with Me,” swept the 2003 Grammys. So, yes, jazz can also be about money and making hit records.

But at Blue Note, it’s still about freedom. Norah Jones is with the label today because she can record what she pleases. So can José James. Born and raised in Minneapolis, now based in New York, James signed with Blue Note in 2012, soon after Don Was became president. (Was is every bit as visionary as Lion, Wolff and Lundvall were.) James has since released four dizzyingly diverse albums on the label; his latest, “Lean on Me,” is a heartfelt homage to soul man Bill Withers. James isn’t featured in the documentary, but he’s another example of how Blue Note stays in the black.

“Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes” screens just once during Sound Unseen: on Sunday, Nov. 18, at 3 p.m. at the Trylon. FMI and tickets ($12/14). This will be its Minnesota premiere. Here’s hoping it returns later for longer.

When it rains, it pours. Another documentary about Blue Note is following closely behind Huber’s. Wim Wenders was executive producer of Eric Friedler’s “It Must Schwing! The Blue Note Story,” which is currently making the festival rounds. We’d like to see that, too. Landmark? MSP Film Society?

RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment