one in six adults has a chronic disease: US CDC

With our health systems strained by the concurrent outbreaks of monkeypox, polio and COVID-19, chronic disease is not receiving the attention they deserve.

one in six adults has a chronic disease US CDC

But as we continue to face ongoing infectious disease threats, we need to build resilient health systems that are equipped to face both public health emergencies and ongoing population health challenges. Pre-pandemic, chronic disease was already a serious problem in the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in six adults has a chronic disease, and four in 10 adults have two or more chronic diseases. These include diabetes, heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, stroke and chronic kidney disease. Chronic diseases represent seven of the top 10 causes of death in the United States. The COVID-19 pandemic has starkly affected chronic disease directly and indirectly through disruption to preventive care and disease management and by contributing to high morbidity and mortality rates. Heart disease, diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease and obesity are all conditions that increase the risk for severe illness from COVID. We have also witnessed the birth of new chronic disease in “long COVID,” which affects nearly one in five Americans. A growing number of studies has shown that COVID can increase a person’s risk of diabetes, even months after infection. A Lancet study found that people who were infected with COVID were about 40 percent more likely to develop diabetes up to a year later than others in the control groups. For every 1,000 people studied in each group, roughly 13 more individuals in the COVID group were diagnosed with diabetes. Even people who had mild infections and no previous risk factors for diabetes had increased odds of developing the chronic condition. Several studies have also highlighted how the pandemic has created a barrier to preventive cancer care. A 2021 study published on the pandemic’s impact on cancer services in Louisiana and Georgia found there were nearly 30,000 fewer cancer pathology reports than in 2019, representing a 10 percent decline. Many reported delaying or missing preventive care appointments due to fear of exposure to the virus in 2020. Without responding to the dual crisis of infectious disease threats like COVID and chronic disease, each will continue to amplify the negative effect of the other.

This will only put further strain on our health systems, ultimately creating barriers or reduced care capacity for other health care issues. Our health care system needs to align incentives to encourage payers, providers, employers and individuals to better prevent, detect, treat and manage chronic diseases before they become acute, costly problems. This begins with increasing access and removing barriers to primary care doctors and complete integrated preventive care. Primary care doctors are critical to helping patients prevent and navigate chronic disease and providing referrals to other specialists who can assist with their conditions. According to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll, one-fourth of adults and nearly half of adults under 30 don’t have a primary care doctor. This care disparity is worse for minorities. A 2020 poll by the African American Research Collection found that Black, Native and Latino Americans reported having less access to a primary care doctor than their white counterparts. One positive impact of the pandemic has been the uptake of telemedicine, particularly for those in rural areas or health care “deserts.” New technological advances can also expand the role that telemedicine plays in at-home care delivery. Remote patient-monitoring devices allow providers to monitor patient progress remotely and receive alerts if there is an issue. To continue to reap the benefits of telemedicine, we need to make the emergency authorizations permanent and ensure payment parity for providers. Equitable access to the internet for all Americans is also necessary to reduce care disparities. Standardized, interoperable health care data systems will also help providers reduce inefficiencies and improve the health system’s ability to proactively identify risk and coordinate care. By investing in emerging technology tools such as big data analytics and genomic testing, providers can conduct early outreach and consistently follow-up, monitor and manage patients more effectively in their homes, while cultivating a deeper understanding of how, why and where chronic diseases develop.

.ud724bcb1bede19d3a573f49f9460a655 { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:inherit; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #D35400!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .ud724bcb1bede19d3a573f49f9460a655:active, .ud724bcb1bede19d3a573f49f9460a655:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .ud724bcb1bede19d3a573f49f9460a655 { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 0.6; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .ud724bcb1bede19d3a573f49f9460a655 .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:#16A085; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .ud724bcb1bede19d3a573f49f9460a655 .postTitle { color:#D35400; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .ud724bcb1bede19d3a573f49f9460a655:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; }

interesting reading:  Why ‘how to permanently delete TikTok’ is trending up

.uc03248fec60b468057bd2c77e6592096 { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:inherit; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #D35400!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .uc03248fec60b468057bd2c77e6592096:active, .uc03248fec60b468057bd2c77e6592096:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .uc03248fec60b468057bd2c77e6592096 { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 0.6; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .uc03248fec60b468057bd2c77e6592096 .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:#16A085; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .uc03248fec60b468057bd2c77e6592096 .postTitle { color:#D35400; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .uc03248fec60b468057bd2c77e6592096:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; }

interesting reading:  No monkeypox cases in Pakistan so far, virus is less contagious than smallpox

Source: This news is originally published by thehill

.u9c5404f7c1feb01f7dad91188eab0be7 { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:inherit; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #D35400!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .u9c5404f7c1feb01f7dad91188eab0be7:active, .u9c5404f7c1feb01f7dad91188eab0be7:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .u9c5404f7c1feb01f7dad91188eab0be7 { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 0.6; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .u9c5404f7c1feb01f7dad91188eab0be7 .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:#16A085; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .u9c5404f7c1feb01f7dad91188eab0be7 .postTitle { color:#D35400; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .u9c5404f7c1feb01f7dad91188eab0be7:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; }

interesting reading:  Pak-China medical AI cooperation to boost chronic disease screening

Supporting female businesses; TFG advocates for Women In Trade on the world stage

Supporting female businesses; TFG advocates for Women In Trade on the world stage – African American News Today – EIN Presswire

Trusted News Since 1995

A service for global professionals · Monday, September 26, 2022 · 592,796,674 Articles · 3+ Million Readers

News Monitoring and Press Release Distribution Tools

News Topics

Newsletters

Press Releases

Events & Conferences

RSS Feeds

Other Services

Questions?

NCES Data Show Black or African American Graduates Who Took Out Federal Student Loans Owed Average of 105 Percent of the Initial Loan Values 4 Years After Graduation

NCES Data Show Black or African American Graduates Who Took Out Federal Student Loans Owed Average of 105 Percent of the Initial Loan Values 4 Years After Graduation – African American News Today – EIN Presswire

Trusted News Since 1995

A service for global professionals · Monday, September 26, 2022 · 592,796,670 Articles · 3+ Million Readers

News Monitoring and Press Release Distribution Tools

News Topics

Newsletters

Press Releases

Events & Conferences

RSS Feeds

Other Services

Questions?

Does DEI Focus Too Much On Black People?

… racial injustice and systemic racism. Despite the exorbitant donations … for justice and equality for African Americans. In 1964, the … the harshest forms of racism and discrimination in Australia. … the Covid-19 pandemic, African Americans had some of the … RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News

African American Author Harps On Hidden Battles Behind Smiling Faces

(AFRICAN EXAMINER) – African American visionary author, Tanya White has said that everyone is fighting an ugly battle behind their beautiful smiles.
White currently resides in Louisville, Kentucky. She is the host of the Real Talk With Tanya White radio show that was extremely popular on Blog Talk Radio and has found a new station home on WLLV 101.9 FM radio and www.wllvonline.com.

She is also a devoted member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated, and was a featured author on the 2022 Delta Authors on Tour.

Notably, she always writes from her real-life experiences – that is, once the situations are over and she has gleaned pivotal lessons from them. However, never in a million years did she imagine writing through a fresh battle of grief as she began coordinating her anthology project.

In June 2021, the author shared the book entitled, “The Battle Behind My Smile: Public Testimonies of Triumph in the Midst of Our Private Trauma”, with her beloved companion, Stefon. Unbeknownst to them, they both were about to live out that title which was going to extremely test their faith, focus, and perseverance.

In the midst of her relocating to Indianapolis, Indiana to begin a new life with Stefon, they received heart-breaking medical news that his prostate cancer was now aggressively inoperable. Predicting a life expectancy of 6-12 months, six weeks later she was peacefully devastated when her beloved Stefon died.

“I asked the Lord why He allowed us to build an amazing relationship filled with tons of love and laughter, only to have Stefon die a few weeks after I officially moved to his hometown of Indianapolis. To say that I was perturbed with God is an understatement”, she said.

Despite not wanting to proceed with the plans for The Battle Behind My Smile, White says that she obeyed God’s leadership and completed coordinating the anthology. Because she had the guts to press through her grief, 18 authors from 5 different states produced a literary gem of emotional and spiritual healing exploring topics such as, the Battle of Having Daddy Dialogue – Coauthor Joe White, Jr., the Battle to Not Give Up While Grieving.

Other are, the Battle of Breaking the Cycle of Domestic Violence – Coauthor Kimeta Pryor and the Battle of My Bipolar Faith – Coauthor Tajiri Brackens

The Battle Behind My Smile reminds readers that everyone you meet is fighting an ugly battle, no matter how big and beautiful their smile seems to be. The book is available in Kindle format and paperback edition on Amazon as well as Barnes and Noble.

Related Posts

Short URL: https://www.africanexaminer.com/?p=81299