one in six adults has a chronic disease: US CDC

With our health systems strained by the concurrent outbreaks of monkeypox, polio and COVID-19, chronic disease is not receiving the attention they deserve.

one in six adults has a chronic disease US CDC

But as we continue to face ongoing infectious disease threats, we need to build resilient health systems that are equipped to face both public health emergencies and ongoing population health challenges. Pre-pandemic, chronic disease was already a serious problem in the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in six adults has a chronic disease, and four in 10 adults have two or more chronic diseases. These include diabetes, heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, stroke and chronic kidney disease. Chronic diseases represent seven of the top 10 causes of death in the United States. The COVID-19 pandemic has starkly affected chronic disease directly and indirectly through disruption to preventive care and disease management and by contributing to high morbidity and mortality rates. Heart disease, diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease and obesity are all conditions that increase the risk for severe illness from COVID. We have also witnessed the birth of new chronic disease in “long COVID,” which affects nearly one in five Americans. A growing number of studies has shown that COVID can increase a person’s risk of diabetes, even months after infection. A Lancet study found that people who were infected with COVID were about 40 percent more likely to develop diabetes up to a year later than others in the control groups. For every 1,000 people studied in each group, roughly 13 more individuals in the COVID group were diagnosed with diabetes. Even people who had mild infections and no previous risk factors for diabetes had increased odds of developing the chronic condition. Several studies have also highlighted how the pandemic has created a barrier to preventive cancer care. A 2021 study published on the pandemic’s impact on cancer services in Louisiana and Georgia found there were nearly 30,000 fewer cancer pathology reports than in 2019, representing a 10 percent decline. Many reported delaying or missing preventive care appointments due to fear of exposure to the virus in 2020. Without responding to the dual crisis of infectious disease threats like COVID and chronic disease, each will continue to amplify the negative effect of the other.

This will only put further strain on our health systems, ultimately creating barriers or reduced care capacity for other health care issues. Our health care system needs to align incentives to encourage payers, providers, employers and individuals to better prevent, detect, treat and manage chronic diseases before they become acute, costly problems. This begins with increasing access and removing barriers to primary care doctors and complete integrated preventive care. Primary care doctors are critical to helping patients prevent and navigate chronic disease and providing referrals to other specialists who can assist with their conditions. According to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll, one-fourth of adults and nearly half of adults under 30 don’t have a primary care doctor. This care disparity is worse for minorities. A 2020 poll by the African American Research Collection found that Black, Native and Latino Americans reported having less access to a primary care doctor than their white counterparts. One positive impact of the pandemic has been the uptake of telemedicine, particularly for those in rural areas or health care “deserts.” New technological advances can also expand the role that telemedicine plays in at-home care delivery. Remote patient-monitoring devices allow providers to monitor patient progress remotely and receive alerts if there is an issue. To continue to reap the benefits of telemedicine, we need to make the emergency authorizations permanent and ensure payment parity for providers. Equitable access to the internet for all Americans is also necessary to reduce care disparities. Standardized, interoperable health care data systems will also help providers reduce inefficiencies and improve the health system’s ability to proactively identify risk and coordinate care. By investing in emerging technology tools such as big data analytics and genomic testing, providers can conduct early outreach and consistently follow-up, monitor and manage patients more effectively in their homes, while cultivating a deeper understanding of how, why and where chronic diseases develop.

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Source: This news is originally published by thehill

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  • Essay: Don’t boycott the vote, commissioners. Come to Ben Taub.

    A few months ago, while working overnight at Ben Taub Hospital, I received a page from one of the internal medicine residents I was supervising. Night shifts have their busy moments and lulls, and the resident happened to catch me during a calm spell. Over the phone, she told me that one of her patients kept ringing the nurses, telling them he was having a heart attack. The man had been admitted for a totally different problem, a urinary tract infection.

    The resident quickly relayed to me the patient’s history, the quality of his symptoms — including that the pain started immediately after his last meal — and the results of the electrocardiogram and blood tests. At the end of her presentation, I asked for the assessment. “I’m not too worried,” she concluded. Finding no fault in her reasoning, I agreed, and so the two of us quickly hatched a plan of care for the rest of the night. “I’m a few floors down in my office if you need me,” I told her. I hung up the phone and immediately turned my attention to the computer monitor on my desk at Ben Taub, from which I had been streaming an episode of “Better Call Saul.” My heels fell into their usual spot beside the monitor as I started to settle in for the rest of the night.

    It’s easy in such a circumstance to sidestep your duty. My job was to be available to the resident throughout the night, which meant verifying with my own eyes and hands that the patient was receiving proper care. But in medicine, like in all jobs where you’re responsible to people, we can forget the basics, even delude ourselves. During residency, one of my colleagues told me, “You can talk your way out of things.”

    Earlier this month, two Harris County commissioners, Tom Ramsey and Jack Cagle, talked themselves out of appearing at a budget meeting . By doing so, they effectively vetoed a measure that would increase the budget of our county’s public health care system, Harris Health, by roughly 2 percent. Harris Health provides more than $2 billion worth of health care locally at clinics and hospitals like Ben Taub, which serves as the public health care system’s flagship. Property taxes provide $780 million of the health care system’s budget. Commissioners Ramsey and Cagle argue that the resulting $45 million shortfall in funding wouldn’t affect patient care at Harris Health . In reality, such a drastic cut would cripple the system’s ability to provide quality care for thousands of residents who rely on it in emergencies, for routine doctor’s visits and everything in between.

    We’ve been here before. In 1964, County Judge Bill Elliott, a Republican, found himself caught in a similar quandary. At the time, the budget for Houston’s charity hospitals, Jefferson Davis and Ben Taub hospitals, were split between the city and county. Neither wanted to give an inch. The conditions at the hospitals deteriorated so much that one of the volunteers at Jefferson Davis, Jan de Hartog, a playwright and former Nazi resistance fighter, wrote an exposé named “The Hospital” that chronicled the effects of underfunding.

    When the terrible conditions became public — de Hartog reported staph infections in the maternity ward and a cockroach crawling around a patient’s tracheostomy tube, among other violations — Elliott could have stuck to party lines and denied that anything was wrong with the hospital. Instead, he visited himself, incognito, as a volunteer. What he saw shocked him enough to throw his support behind a new taxing authority to fund a hospital district. In 1965, after four prior rejected referendums, Houstonians voted in favor of a property tax to support those unable to afford private health care.

    Much has changed since Elliott’s visit to Jefferson Davis Hospital. Our public hospitals are no longer decrepit. Harris Health has grown into one of the premier safety net systems in the country. In 2014, Ben Taub Hospital clocked the fastest average “door-to-balloon” time nationally in the treatment of heart attacks. “Door-to-balloon” measures how long it takes a hospital to identify a heart attack in the emergency room and open the clogged coronary artery with a balloon or stent; the shorter the time, the better. The hospital has also earned plaudits for its treatment of stroke and trauma, all while having to provide care to a larger pool of patients. Houston’s uninsured rate is the highest in the country, a trend worsened by the pandemic and the state’s unwillingness to expand government-sponsored Medicaid . Add to that the increased demand and expense of nursing care during COVID and it’s clear that commissioners Ramsey and Cagle are asking the impossible: for our public health care system to provide high-level care for more people with the same amount of funding.

    Harris Health already runs one of the tightest ships in the country . A report in the New York Times listed its hospitals as the second least expensive nationally. Asking Harris Health to cut costs further risks shooting ourselves in the foot. Take the example of kidney disease. A 2007 study performed at Ben Taub and published in “Texas Medicine ” showed that dialysis treatments in the ER cost four times as much as when these were scheduled three times weekly in a dialysis center. Patients whose dialysis sessions are canceled end up visiting the emergency room to receive the treatment. They have to in order to survive. In fact, it’s their right: The Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act, or EMTALA, guarantees any person regardless of citizenship or ability to pay the right to receive emergency care in a life-or-death situation. Without a budget increase to offset higher costs , Harris Health says it may be forced to shut down the clinics that help prevent visits to the emergency room and save county funds. We would not only be placing these people in harm’s way, but we’d also be throwing away taxpayer money.

    Ramsey and Cagle aren’t the first politicians to doubt how essential our public health care system is to the city. In 2001, then-Texas Attorney General John Cornyn criticized Harris Health for providing health care to the undocumented who couldn’t afford private health care. One year later, while visiting one of Harris Health’s clinics during his campaign for U.S. Senate, Cornyn took back his words : “ It’s only humane and more cost-effective to provide preventive care in clinics like this than it would be to just have [undocumented immigrants] clog emergency rooms after they’ve gotten a lot sicker and a lot more expensive to treat.”

    It’s time to set politics aside and think about the economic and social benefits that a public health care system such as Harris Health gives our community. We all have our political leanings. For instance, my wife works as a communication consultant for Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo, who supports the increase. I happened, however, to vote for Ed Emmett in the last election, in part because he visited the medical area at NRG Center set up to help Hurricane Harvey survivors. One reason I plan to vote for Hidalgo this time around is that I’m concerned her opponent, who has a corporate finance background, might follow the lead of other local governments and sell Ben Taub and LBJ to a private equity firm. There’s no question that this budget increase impacts me, not necessarily financially — Harris Health does not directly pay me — though an increase would give me a more stable environment to practice medicine.

    On the other hand, I’m also a payer of property taxes who doesn’t shirk at paying more every year. In the final calculus, I don’t mind paying more taxes to an institution such as Harris Health. I’ve chosen to work there for the last 12 years because I believe in its value to the community. I’ve witnessed its impact on lives. I know that people who can’t afford or access health care receive sound scientific and personal help at Ben Taub. Insured African American and white patients have told me they only visit Ben Taub because they trust the doctors and staff, a far cry from when Bill Elliott visited Jefferson Davis. Harris Health is exactly the type of institution that we should support with our taxes.

    And so, I would like to invite Ramsey and Cagle to come with me on a tour of Ben Taub. I would take them through the nursing units so they can see how amiable and professional the staff is with one another; how clean the hospital is; how a very high standard of medicine takes place here. I’d also show them the patients temporarily boarding in the hallways and how full the emergency room gets. I’d make sure to point out for them the announcements “Code Purple” and “EC Saturation Level One,” not to mention the 10-second recording of Tina Turner’s “Simply the Best” whenever a patient with COVID leaves the hospital breathing. I’d point out the travel nurses and those who have worked seven days straight. I would take them to Riverside Dialysis Center, the busiest in the city run by Harris Health, and I’d ask them which of these patients we should ask to visit the emergency room every four days. I would let the hospital speak for itself.

    And if a resident calls me to check on a patient with chest pain, I wouldn’t hesitate. “Wait right here for a second, commissioners,” I’d say, so that I can lay my hands on the person, just as I had with the patient experiencing chest pain that night. Showing up at his bedside made a difference to him, especially when I explained why I thought he wasn’t having a heart attack. Your presence, commissioners, would make all the difference to the taxpayers. That’s our job, after all. We would perform our duties together.

    Ricardo Nuila has practiced medicine at Ben Taub Hospital as a hospitalist and teaching attending since 2010. He is an associate professor at Baylor College of Medicine, where he directs the Humanities Expression and Arts Lab. His opinions do not represent those of Baylor. His book “ The People’s Hospital: Hope and Peril in American Medicine ” will be published by Scribner in March.

    Dr. Shahla Masood: Ongoing disparities in breast cancer patient outcomes

    Following recommendations for routine screenings can help detect breast cancer early.

    The recent decline in breast cancer mortality rates around the world is attributed to an increase in patient education, advances in breast imaging and screening and breast cancer therapy innovations. The emerging discoveries about the biology of this disease and the introduction of molecular targeted therapy (a treatment to target specific molecules to destroy cancer cells or to slow their growth) could potentially further reduce breast cancer mortality.

    Despite all the advances made, early breast cancer detection, treatment and control have not equally benefitted all patient populations. Breast cancer patients who are African American suffer from a higher mortality rate compared to their white counterparts in the United States.

    Higher mortality rates 

    Breast cancer is still the second-leading cause of cancer death among African American women, with 40% more likely to die than white women in the U.S. and other world regions. The incidence of breast cancer in African American women is continuously increasing, while there is no marked decrease in mortality trends.

    Another disparity is the age factor for African American women — they are more likely to get breast cancer at a younger age.

    In addition, they are more likely to present at a later stage of the disease at diagnosis than white women. These factors show African Americans lag behind the progress made in breast cancer screening, diagnosis and treatment, causing these patients to continue to suffer disproportionally from this disease.

    Risk factors for breast cancer 

    Several recent studies have focused on identifying factors that may contribute to the current disparities. Socioeconomic status, access to care and late-stage presentation have been considered as a few reasons why African American breast cancer patients experience poor outcomes. Breast cancer is often associated with aggressive cancer subtypes, such as triple-negative breast cancer, which lacks three markers associated with breast cancer: estrogen, progesterone and human epidermal growth factor receptors.

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    As a result, the biology of individual breast cancer cases among African American patients has been considered as one of the predisposing factors for poor outcomes. 

    These observations suggest a critical need for comprehensive genomic analysis of breast cancer among African Americans vs. white patients to better understand the distinct genomic profile in different ethnic groups. Another measure to increase understanding is encouraging African American breast cancer patients to enroll in clinical trials to benefit from the opportunities of new discoveries. 

    Removing barriers to care 

    The National Academy of Medicine recognizes the breast cancer disparities among African Americans and recommends a multilevel approach to either eliminate or reduce disparities. This can be accomplished by removing key barriers to care. 

    • Develop effective programs to increase public breast health education on important topics. These topics include behavioral lifestyle changes, such as diet, exercise and reducing stress, as well as which preventive health screenings are required to catch breast cancer early. 
    • Establish effective follow-up measures for recommended tests following initial screenings. These may include letters, phone calls and digital communications. 
    • Increase equitable access to care for all patients. Access barriers may include transportation, hours of operation and finances. 

    The implementation of community-centered and team-based approaches to care has also shown promise in reducing local breast cancer disparities. Leveraging the advancements in breast cancer screenings and therapies to reach and educate African American women and allowing easier and more equitable access to health care will make a difference in outcomes for African American breast cancer patients.

    Masood

    Shahla Masood, MD, is professor and chairwoman of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville. She is also medical director of the UF Health Breast Center Jacksonville, interim director of UF Health Cancer Program Jacksonville and chief of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, UF Health Jacksonville. 

    This guest column is the opinion of the author and does not necessarily represent the views of the Times-Union. We welcome a diversity of opinions

    We need resilient health systems to address the dual crisis of infectious and chronic diseases

    With our health systems strained by the concurrent outbreaks of monkeypox, polio and COVID-19, chronic diseases are not receiving the attention they deserve. But as we continue to face ongoing infectious disease threats, we need to build resilient health systems that are equipped to face both public health emergencies and ongoing population health challenges.                                    

    Pre-pandemic, chronic disease was already a serious problem in the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in six adults has a chronic disease, and four in 10 adults have two or more chronic diseases. These include diabetes, heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, stroke and chronic kidney disease. Chronic diseases represent seven of the top 10 causes of death in the United States.   

    The COVID-19 pandemic has starkly affected chronic disease directly and indirectly through disruption to preventive care and disease management and by contributing to high morbidity and mortality rates. Heart disease, diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease and obesity are all conditions that increase the risk for severe illness from COVID. We have also witnessed the birth of new chronic disease in “long COVID,” which affects nearly one in five Americans.            

    A growing number of studies has shown that COVID can increase a person’s risk of diabetes, even months after infection. A Lancet study found that people who were infected with COVID were about 40 percent more likely to develop diabetes up to a year later than others in the control groups. For every 1,000 people studied in each group, roughly 13 more individuals in the COVID group were diagnosed with diabetes. Even people who had mild infections and no previous risk factors for diabetes had increased odds of developing the chronic condition.     

    Several studies have also highlighted how the pandemic has created a barrier to preventive cancer care. A 2021 study published on the pandemic’s impact on cancer services in Louisiana and Georgia found there were nearly 30,000 fewer cancer pathology reports than in 2019, representing a 10 percent decline. Many reported delaying or missing preventive care appointments due to fear of exposure to the virus in 2020. 

    Without responding to the dual crisis of infectious disease threats like COVID and chronic disease, each will continue to amplify the negative effect of the other. This will only put further strain on our health systems, ultimately creating barriers or reduced care capacity for other health care issues.                

    Our health care system needs to align incentives to encourage payers, providers, employers and individuals to better prevent, detect, treat and manage chronic diseases before they become acute, costly problems. This begins with increasing access and removing barriers to primary care doctors and complete integrated preventive care.

    Primary care doctors are critical to helping patients prevent and navigate chronic disease and providing referrals to other specialists who can assist with their conditions.

    According to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll, one-fourth of adults and nearly half of adults under 30 don’t have a primary care doctor. This care disparity is worse for minorities. A 2020 poll by the African American Research Collection found that Black, Native and Latino Americans reported having less access to a primary care doctor than their white counterparts.

    One positive impact of the pandemic has been the uptake of telemedicine, particularly for those in rural areas or health care “deserts.” New technological advances can also expand the role that telemedicine plays in at-home care delivery. Remote patient-monitoring devices allow providers to monitor patient progress remotely and receive alerts if there is an issue. To continue to reap the benefits of telemedicine, we need to make the emergency authorizations permanent and ensure payment parity for providers. Equitable access to the internet for all Americans is also necessary to reduce care disparities.  

    Standardized, interoperable health care data systems will also help providers reduce inefficiencies and improve the health system’s ability to proactively identify risk and coordinate care.

    By investing in emerging technology tools such as big data analytics and genomic testing, providers can conduct early outreach and consistently follow-up, monitor and manage patients more effectively in their homes, while cultivating a deeper understanding of how, why and where chronic diseases develop.          

    By investing in resilient health systems to address public health emergencies and chronic disease, we can encourage healthy longevity for all. 

    Dr. William Haseltine is president of ACCESS Health International and will be moderating two expert panels at the Metabesity 2022 conference on how lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic can prepare us to address the ongoing epidemic of chronic diseases.  

    The AIA Baltimore announce today that the will Reward Architect Elbaz Simo for Preserving the Old buildings

    The AIA Baltimore announce today that the will Reward Architect Elbaz Simo for Preserving the Old buildings – African American News Today – EIN Presswire

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    It’s time to exercise your right—to vote

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    “Nobody will ever deprive the American people of the right to vote except the American people themselves, and the only way they could do this is by not voting.” — President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

    The right to vote has thankfully become deeply ingrained in our American psyche as an assumed right, one that is owed to us as citizens of this great nation.

    But it is important to recall that it wasn’t always this way. We must be vigilant to ensure that voters from all backgrounds and geographic areas have equal access to casting their vote.

    For many, the right to vote was withheld for decades, and some new laws are making it nearly impossible for some people to access the polls. While we must work to strike down these voter-suppression laws that disproportionately impact voters of color, poor voters and young voters, here are a few considerations on why the right to vote is one we must never take for granted:

    African Americans

    While Black men were given voting rights in 1870, Black women were still banned from voting in some places until the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed. Signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson, this historic act outlawed the discriminatory voting practices that had been adopted in many Southern states after the Civil War, such as literacy tests. Other obstacles included poll taxes — imagine having to pay to receive your ballot! — and even a “white primary,” in which only white people could participate. If you’ve ever used or heard the term “grandfathered in,” it refers to the “grandfather clause” some states used to prevent descendants of slaves from voting, until the Supreme Court invalidated it in 1915. Black men were not allowed to vote unless their grandfather had voted — an impossibility for people whose ancestors were enslaved.

    Native Americans

    In 1788, when the U.S. Constitution was ratified, Native Americans were not considered citizens. Even when African Americans were guaranteed citizenship in 1868, the 14th Amendment was interpreted to exclude Native Americans. In 1948, the Arizona Supreme Court recognized the legal right of Native Americans to vote. Finally, by 1957 all states had removed laws denying Native Americans the right to vote. However, some states continued to suppress their votes and those of other minority groups through discriminatory practices like literacy tests. Today, new laws make it difficult for voters in rural areas to vote by implementing strict voter ID requirements (Native Americans often don’t have traditional street addresses) and by placing drop boxes and election offices long distances from reservations — sometimes nearly 300 miles round trip.

    Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

    While our state has some of the most luxurious homes and resorts in the world, approximately 21 percent of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in Hawai’i live in poverty. Another 6 percent lack health insurance, and 14 percent lack access to broadband connectivity. And, 44 percent of Asian Americans in Hawai’i speak a language other than English at home, and 25 percent have limited proficiency in English. Thus, language challenges, a lack of access to online education and even a lack of health care can all contribute to voting barriers for some of our constituents with the most diverse sets of needs.

    Women

    Women’s suffrage advocates first started protesting and lobbying in the 1800s for their cause. A constitutional amendment was introduced in Congress in 1878, but it was not ratified until 1920. It took decades of dedicated voices rallying to achieve this success, through a wide variety of protests and court cases, including hunger strikes, picketing, silent vigils and lawsuits challenging male-only voting laws. Many supporters were heckled, abused and even jailed for fighting for a woman’s right to vote.

    The struggles for many to obtain or retain the right to vote increase the value of our right to express our choice at the ballot box. To not vote is to allow others to make that choice for you.

    But in our democratic system, choosing not to vote is an equally valid decision. All we can ask is to consider your choices and to vote thoughtfully if you decide to exercise your right to cast a ballot.

    * Tasha Kama is chairwoman of the Human Concerns and Parks Committee. She holds the council seat for the Kahului residency area. “Council’s 3 Minutes” is a column to explain the latest news on county legislative matters. Go to mauicounty.us for more information.

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    Ron DeSantis and Greg Abbott pull from segregationist playbook with anti-immigration stunts

    In many ways, Republicans like Abbott and DeSantis are the political descendants of Southern segregationists whose cruelty horrified other Americans in the 1960s.

    Immigration scholars have noted how U.S. foreign policies contributed to the poverty and violence in Central and South America that migrants are fleeing. Yet rather than acknowledge this – along with assuming the moral responsibilities it entails – some GOP leaders denigrate and dehumanize refugees to win support from voters drawn to xenophobic messaging.

    Watching this resurgent nativism, racism and disregard for human rights gaining strength in the 21st century is an ominous sight for anyone familiar with where these ideas have led in the past.

    This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

    Your guide to local college scholarships

    Are you looking forward to your high school graduation and starting college next fall? 

    It’s never too early to start preparing for how you will pay for your post-high school experience. There are numerous scholarship opportunities available through the Midland Area Community Foundation. 

    All scholarship applicants should visit the foundation’s website at midlandfoundation.org to get started with applying. The application period for all scholarships is Nov. 1, 2022 through Jan. 15, 2023.

    Midland Area Community Foundation logo. (Photo provided/MACF)

    Midland Area Community Foundation logo. (Photo provided/MACF)

    Ashley Sue Adan Memorial Scholarship for Special Education

    Provides a scholarship award to Midland County residents who meet the following criteria: a) special education paraprofessionals or Para-educators pursuing a teaching degree in Special Education, or b) graduating high school seniors, college or graduate students pursuing a teaching degree in Special Education. Preference will first be given to paraprofessionals or Para-educators or to other individuals who have demonstrated the compassion and commitment required to work with and help Special Education students. Previous recipients may reapply.

    Turner Alfrey, Jr. Scholarship

    Provides an award for a student who has completed his/her freshman year at a recognized institution of higher learning at the time of the application. The successful applicant is pursuing a career in teaching or research in the fields of science or engineering. Preference will be given to the following fields: polymers, mechanical or chemical engineering, mathematics, chemistry or physics.

    The essay for this scholarship should describe personal background and achievements, course of study, and explain career goals in the scientific and technical fields selected. This award may be renewed once, provided that the student submits to the Foundation a letter requesting renewal as well as an updated official transcript proving they have maintained a B or better GPA and that the course of study has not changed. These must be submitted by the then current scholarship deadline.

    Alpha Kappa Alpha/MAO (Mu Alpha Omega Chapter) Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to young people of color who are attending a four-year university or college or Delta College (or another approved two-year college in plant communities serving Dow employees). Eligible candidates for consideration will be descendants of African American, Native American or Hispanic ancestry and will be those with a grade point average of 2.9 or above.

    In addition, MAO scholars will demonstrate sound character, civic purpose and volunteer service in their school or community and interest in a specified career field. As part of the scholarship application, one of the references must be from a member of the MAO chapter.

    Richard and E. Mair Alsgaard Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior, current college/technical school student or nontraditional student who is planning to pursue a course of study in welding or other areas of the skilled trades.

    American Association of University Women – Midland Branch Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award for higher education to a woman residing in Midland County.

    Graduating Senior Woman: The successful applicant must graduate from a high school under the jurisdiction of the MCESA (Midland County Educational Service Agency) or be a Midland County resident graduating from high school in the year of the award. The applicant must be a female with a cumulative, unweighted 3.0 GPA or better. The award is based on a combination of merit and need. The essay for this scholarship should describe how this award will help the applicant attain her educational goals and her potential contribution to society. It may include such topics as career choice and reasons for that choice, involvement in school and community activities plus any special needs to be considered. Awardee must intend to pursue her education full time in the year following the award and be working toward a baccalaureate degree.

    Women in Transition: This scholarship will be awarded to a Midland County woman who has had a delay or interruption in education beyond high school and who wishes to work toward a baccalaureate or higher degree. Applicant could also already have a baccalaureate degree and be returning to college for re-education with a specific career goal in mind. A “delay” is any amount of time beyond one year after completion of secondary education. An “interruption” is equal to two full semesters or more en route to a baccalaureate or higher degree. The scholarship is based on a combination of merit, need, and potential contribution to society. Please include the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) page of your completed FAFSA. The essay for this scholarship should describe career goals, reasons for applying for this scholarship, activities or studies in the past five years and expand on potential contributions to society. A previous recipient may reapply for a second year if a 3.0 cumulative GPA or better is achieved during the first year. This award must be used in the academic year following the announcement of the recipient. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

    H. Floyd Andrick Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County graduating senior or current college student who is studying history or a related field at any Michigan two or four-year accredited college or university. Financial need will be a consideration. Previous recipients may reapply.

    Thurman O. Sr. and Mary E. Armstrong Educational Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County resident.  The essay should include information on your academic performance as well as your volunteerism.  Please include any barrier you may have overcome in your life as well as your commitment to a career goal, work ethic and determination.

    Roger Asiala Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland or Dow High School graduating senior who is going into a STEM (Science, technology, engineering, and math) related field of study including medicine and the trades.  Preference will be given to students that have financial need.

    James Ayre Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to a Midland County resident who should demonstrate financial need and be pursuing a degree in business or real estate from one of the following colleges: Delta College, Northwood University, Central Michigan University or Western Michigan University.  The recipient need not have been an above average or excellent student, but should show college potential as determined by school counselors.  Available to students pursuing either undergraduate or graduate degrees.

    Gwendolyn M. Bagley Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to residents of Midland and/or Gladwin Counties who are either current college students or graduating seniors from public high schools within the two counties.  Applicants should be planning a career in teaching in the health/physical education area or a career in nursing.

    Dorothy J. Baker Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award(s) to a graduate of a Midland County High School who is pursuing an education in fashion/clothing design, retail merchandising or interior design.  The applicant must have a grade point average of 3.0 or better and must communicate their passion and commitment to the industry in the essay.

    Dr. Shailer L. Bass Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual grant to a non-traditional student pursuing post high school studies at a community college, college, or university.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    The Beaverton Lions Club Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship(s) award to a graduating senior of either Beaverton High School or Gladwin High School with a cumulative grade point average of 2.25 or higher.

    Big Brothers Big Sisters Education Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County High School graduating senior or current college/trade school student who is and/or has been a Big Brothers Big Sisters mentee with a minimum GPA or 2.0.  Previous recipients may reapply by preference will be given to applicants who have not received the scholarship.

    Sharon Brady Michigan Technological University Alpha Delta Alpha Sorority Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a female student attending Michigan Technological University and is a member of the Alpha Delta Alpha Sorority with a preference to applicants of Midland and Gladwin Counties.

    E.N. (Ned) Brandt Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a student majoring in public relations or communications.  Preference will be given to students who have given back to the community through service activities and have an interest in history, public affairs or philanthropy.

    Jeannette Brandt Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to encourage and foster study and use of foreign languages with a preference to those studying the French language.  The student may be pursuing any college major but must evidence an interest in foreign language.

    Duane E. and Barbara J. Bremer Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a student at Concordia University who is pursuing a career in church work.

    Terry and Eileen Brokoff Scholarship

    Provides two annual scholarship awards to Gladwin High School graduating seniors who have financial need, a grade point average of 3.0 or above, with one scholarship for a student who is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in human medicine and one scholarship to a student who is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in a STEM (Science, technology, engineering and math) field with a preference to those studying engineering.

    Ernest R. and Martha E. Britton Memorial Scholarship

    Provides up to two one-time awards of $2,500 for graduating seniors from a Midland County public high school. Financial need may be considered when all other factors are equal. The applicants must demonstrate leadership in service projects through school, scouting, church, etc., and participation in activities such as band, cheerleading, pom pom, Pep Club, etc.

    James T. Brooks Memorial Fine Arts Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating high school senior from a Midland County High School.  The successful recipient will be pursuing a career in fine arts (music, visual arts, theatre, dance, etc.) and will have demonstrated outstanding achievements in – and a passion for – the discipline.  Financial need will also be among the criteria.

    Nancy and Parke Brown Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a current student at Lawrence Technological University (LTU) or a graduating high school senior or transfer student who is planning to attend LTU.  Preference will be given to those that demonstrate financial need.  Previous recipients may reapply.  Applicants for this scholarship should describe financial need, education, work experience, and career goals in their essay.

    Buell Family Scholarship for Foster Care Students

    Provides a college education for a student who in the current year or previous three years is graduating or has graduated from high school or received his/her GED.  The student must have come out of the foster care system.  The student should be a Midland or Gladwin County resident (preference for Midland County), and plan to attend or be attending any public university, community college or private college in Michigan as a full-time residential or commuter student.

    Students attending a private college would receive an amount equivalent to the average cost of state universities in Michigan. It is expected that the recipient could continue to receive funding for up to four years or completion of degree or certification program assuming acceptable academic progress, and that every four years (or upon completion of a degree or certification program) a new recipient would be selected.  Consideration could be given for a fifth year if it is required for degree completion, and the student is still attending college full-time.  The student must maintain a 2.5 GPS and have evidence of completing 40 hours of community service annually.

    Bullock Creek Alumni Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Bullock Creek High School graduating senior or Bullock Creek High School Graduate.  The successful applicant will be planning to attend an accredited community college, college or university, or technical or trade school in the year of the award.  Preference will be for applications that show some work experience, financial need, and a career and community service focus.

    Bullock Creek Area Business Association Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship(s) award(s) to a graduating senior(s) from Bullock Creek High School who has attended Bullock Creek High School for at least two years who is attending a Michigan college, university, trade or technical school.

    Barbara M. Burdon Memorial Education Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship award(s) to a Bullock Creek High School graduating senior who is pursuing a degree or certification in education, science and/or business.

    Susan Burgess Memorial Flute Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a flute student to attend camp, take private lessons, purchase a flute or attend college studying music with an emphasis on flute.

    Pat Bywater Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship for a graduating senior from either Midland High or H.H. Dow High School in the year of the award, or for a previous recipient of the award.

    Bob G. Caldwell Memorial Engineering Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to a Midland County resident who is enrolled in an accredited school with a major in chemistry, engineering or business/industrial management who has complete at least two years of college.  When all criteria are equal, the award will go to a student needing financial assistance.

    Carey Family Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to a Midland County resident who is graduating from a Midland County Public High School or to a Midland County public high school graduate who is now attending a college or university.  Previous recipients are welcome to reapply.  Preference will be for Meridian High School graduating seniors or graduates who are studying business, environmental science or education.

    Walter and Therese Cepela Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to a Midland High School graduating senior who is in the top 10% of their graduating class, but who has had to work hard for his/her grades and has not been as active in extracurricular or community activities as some.

    Robert W. and Veronica M. Cermak Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a student pursuing post high school studies at accredited trade or technical schools, community colleges, colleges or universities.  For a resident of Midland County who meets the above requirements, and who needs to sharpen old skill or acquire new ones to re-enter the job market, or persons whose formal educations have been interrupted either at the high school or undergraduate levels.

    Robert W. Cermak Engineering Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to an engineering student to assist him/her in pursuing higher education. The student is to be enrolled in an accredited school of engineering and have successfully completed at least two years of studies in an engineering curriculum.  To be used for undergraduate studies only.

    Duane Cherkinsky Midland Believes Scholarship

    Provides one or more scholarships in conjunction with the Midland Believes Scholarship program, which provides annual scholarship awards to Midland County first generation college-going and economically disadvantaged students with preference given to candidates that have both.  This scholarship is renewable for a second year to students meeting scholarship requirements.  Recipients must be enrolled or plan on attending a Michigan educational organization. 

    O. James Clark Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland Public School graduate who is currently enrolled in college and is a junior or senior with preference given to those with financial need and a GPA of 3.0 or above.  The student must be studying a humanities field (language, art, social studies, etc.) and previous recipients may reapply.

    Bob Cole Track & Field and Cross-Country Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior of Meridian High School who participated in track & field or cross country for at least two years.  The student must describe how track or cross country helped them become a team player and how athletics impacted their high school academic experience.  A letter of support from their coach demonstrating the student’s commitment to their sport, their team and self-improvement should accompany the application.

    Coleman Community Schools Scholastic Award & Forsberg Endowed Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to graduates of Coleman Community High School who present evidence of acceptance by and enrollment in a Michigan accredited educational organization of high learning.  Preference will be given to those candidates with demonstrated academic standing who have financial need.  Applications for succeeding years will be accepted from prior awardees, but first year applicants shall have priority.  Scholarships shall be awarded for tuition, fees, books or supplies for a maximum of two academic years and is renewable each term based on recipient’s satisfactory cumulative grade point average.

    Donna “Teach” Comfort Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Gladwin County resident to attend an accredited program – college or university, or long- or short-term vocational training program.  The recipient would have graduated from high school or obtained the GED prior to using this scholarship.  Recipients may reapply in one subsequent year provided they demonstrate at least a 3.0 GPA and absences of three days or less.

    Community Outreach Team (COT) Endowed Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating high school senior or college freshman, sophomore or junior, whose parent is employed by the Dow Chemical Company, by another tenant of the Michigan Operations manufacturing site or by a contractor with the Michigan Operations manufacturing site, with preference given to applicants who have been involved in the community.

    Susan Olney Cozat Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland or Gladwin County woman whose education has been delayed or interrupted and is pursuing any post-secondary education.  Preference will be given to single mothers who have underage children living with them and have financial need.  Previous recipients may reapply. 

    Noah Elliott Cummings Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to traditional or non-traditional students seeking a two or four year degree at an accredited college or university or a certification in the trades.  Preference will be given to the non-traditional student seeking a trade certification.

    Doctors Dale and Lisa Davis Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduate of Midland Public Schools who is pursuing a degree in science such as but not limited to biology, chemistry, medicine or dentistry.

    Janet M. Dean Opera Cum Laude Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a deserving graduating senior at Bullock Creek High School in the year of the award.  The recipient will display characteristics that Ms. Janet Dean instilled in the school and her students: academic success, community service, citizenship, interests in the school.  The recipient will be a person who has aided and dedicated his/her time to the community far beyond normal expectations.  This is the most important criterion for this scholarship.

    Kent S. Dennis Memorial Scholarship

    To encourage and enrich the musical education of present and future church or synagogue organists by providing a scholarship for beginning or further study of the organ.

    Virginia A. (Nicholson) Dent Scholarship

    Provides scholarships and/or camperships to able and deserving violin students for continuing study of the instrument.

    J. Cecil and Clara DeRemer Memorial Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarships to Midland County residents who have been accepted as music majors in a degree-granting college or university.  Both college and high school seniors are eligible to apply.  Previous recipients may reapply if the student maintains a B average in the music curriculum.  Undergraduates will be given a preference.

    Sarah Keishian Dergazarian Vocal Music Education Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a vocal music education student who will be either a college junior, senior or graduate student in the year of the award.

    Marcia and Wendell Dilling Agriculture and Chemistry Endowed Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County high school graduate or graduating senior pursuing a degree in chemistry or agriculture.  Students must have a 3.0 GPA and preference will be given to those with financial need.

    Herbert D. Doan Memorial Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to Midland County residents pursuing post high school education in the area of construction, bioscience/health, manufacturing or informational technology.  Educational opportunities can be taken at a community college, university, trade or technical school or through an industry-recognized certification program.

    Steven and Kathleen Dolan Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior of a Midland County high school who is pursuing a degree in science, technology, engineering, math, healthcare, or arts at an accredited four year college or university.  The applicant must have a 3.5 grade point average and demonstrate financial need.  The essay for this scholarship should state the student’s personal and career goals as well as a description of school and community activities in which the student has participated.

    Dorman Family Midland Believes Scholarship

    Provides one or more scholarships in conjunction with the Midland Believes scholarship program, which provides annual scholarship awards to Midland County first generation college-going and economically disadvantaged students with preference given to candidates that have both. This scholarship is renewable for a second year to students meeting scholarship requirements. Recipients must be enrolled or plan on attending a Michigan educational organization.

    Dow Chemical Employees’ Credit Union Employees Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to an employee or dependent of an employee of Dow Chemical Employees’ Credit Union to pursue post high school studies at an accredited community college, college or university.  The employee or their dependent must be a member in good standing with Dow Chemical Employees’ Credit Union.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    Dow Chemical Employees’ Credit Union Members Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a member in good standing with Dow Chemical Employees’ Credit Union to pursue post high school studies at an accredited community college, college or university.  Employees and dependents of employees of Dow Chemical Employees’ Credit Union are ineligible for awards from this fund.  Previous recipients may reapply. 

    Willard H. and Martha P. Dow Memorial Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to a student graduating from Midland County high schools in the year of the award, pursuing higher education in a humanities-related field such as English, foreign language, art, music, journalism, etc. 

    Kenneth J. Dubiel Memorial 4-H Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship award(s) to Gladwin High School and/or Beaverton High School graduating high school seniors for the purpose of attending an accredited post-secondary educational institution.  The successful applicant will be a current and actively enrolled student in the Gladwin County 4-H program and will have been enrolled for at least 5 years.

    Dyste Family Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a current Junior or Senior at a Michigan college or university who is pursuing a chemical engineering degree.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    John C. Eckhold III Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a resident of Midland County who is either a graduating senior or current college students.  The successful recipient would demonstrate financial need, and would show how he/she is overcoming or has overcome a personal or family difficulty.  The successful recipient would also demonstrate a recent commitment to achieving academic success and would be driven to pursuit of service-oriented career, such as health/nursing/medicine, education, etc.

    Elder/Civitan Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a college student who has some handicap or disability, or who will be studying to work with disabled individuals.

    Robert E. and Beverly V. Erickson Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County resident pursuing a bachelor’s degree in nursing.  Must have completed at least their sophomore year in college.

    Chase Erway Endowed Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship award(s) to Gladwin County graduating seniors, prior year’s award recipients, or individuals who have obtained their GED and live in Gladwin County. Applicants must have a minimum 2.5 GPA on a 4.0 scale and demonstrate financial need. Preference will be given to those individuals pursuing a degree or certificate in skilled trades at an educational organization. If there are at least two scholarships being offered, preference should be given to have one Beaverton High School graduating senior. 

    If there are no applicants pursuing skilled trades, individuals attending a community college or university are eligible if pursuing a degree in education, engineering, or business administration/business management.  Recipients may reapply in one subsequent year provided they demonstrate at least a 2.5 GPA and continue to show financial need.

    The Eyes Can See Clearly Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County High School graduating senior or current college student who is pursuing an ophthalmology, optometry or optician related field of study at a Michigan educational organization.  Preference will be given to students who have financial need, possess leadership ability and community involvement.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    Faith Scholarship

    To assist with the cost of tuition, books and fees for Meridian High School graduates who have a financial need and wish to pursue studies at an accredited college or occupational program.

    Falender Family Meridian High School Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating Meridian High School senior each year for up to four years assuming acceptable academic progress is made.  It will be the responsibility of the student to provide to the Midland Area Community Foundation each year proof of their academic progress and eligibility to continue to receive scholarship awards.  The student’s academic progress shall be satisfactory and the student shall be eligible for a scholarship award if the following conditions are met: a) the student shall maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 ( C ) and b) the student shall remain enrolled in a four-year course of study leading to a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.  Upon receipt of this information a check will be sent to the school to provide funding for the next year. 

    Every four years a new recipient will be selected unless the current student does not successfully complete the academic progress required in subsequent years.  In that event a new student could be selected sooner.

    Christina J. Fisher Memorial Scholarship

    Providea an annual scholarship award to a graduating high school senior who has been involved with the Midland County 4-H Horse Program.  A previous recipient of the award may reapply one time only.  The successful applicant will have achieved positive youth development in the area of horses, will have significant and active 4-H involvement, and will have demonstrated community service and financial need.

    Robert F. and Irene W. Fleming Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award of up to $5,000.00 to a student planning to attend or attending a four-year accredited college affiliated with either: a) the Lutheran Church (ELCA or Missouri Synod); or b) the Presbyterian Church; with preference given to those who are pursuing either: a) a degree in STEM (science, technology, engineering or math); or b) in music.  Preference will be given to students meeting one or more of the following criteria, not necessarily in the order listed: a) students who are members of the Trinity Lutheran Church in Midland; or b) students who are members of the Memorial Presbyterian Church in Midland; provided however that students attending Presbyterian College in Clinton, South Carolina, will be given the highest priority.  Students must have a B average or above to be eligible.  Previous recipients may reapply.  In the event that the income of the Fund in any year exceeds $10,000.00 two scholarships may be awarded.

    Rick Foley Scholarship

    Provides and annual scholarship award to Meridian High School graduates or graduating seniors who attend or are planning to attend public university or college and are involved in community service.  Preference will be given to students that are going into teaching and have financial need.   Previous recipients may reapply.

    Michael F. Freeland Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a deserving student-athlete who is a graduating senior at Bullock Creek High School in the year of the award.  The recipient will have a minimum 3.0 GPA and must be deemed by fellow students, teachers and coaches as a hard worker and unselfish person.  The recipient would not necessarily be the most talented athlete or the best student, but someone who can always be counted on for their best effort during every class and every athletic activity.

    Elloweese Denise Freer Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award(s) to either a graduating high school senior or current college student pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, or a graduate student pursuing a Master of Nurse Anesthesia, or a graduate student pursuing Veterinary Medicine.  The successful applicants will be Midland or Gladwin County residents, and will demonstrate both financial need and strong academics.

    Kristina Garafalo, A Person of Excellence Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Gladwin County High School graduate who is pursuing a degree in a medical-related field with preference given to those studying neuroscience or psychology.  Applicants should have a minimum 3.5 GPA.  Preference will be given to students who have worked a job during their high school years and to those who have been in dance.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    The Glenn R. and Marilyn F. Garrison Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to Midland County residents.  The successful applicants must have at least a 3.0 GPA, have a good work ethic, and be involved in Christian church activities, and must demonstrate that they are investing in helping others.  Graduating high school seniors, current college students, or adult and non-traditional students may apply.  One reference should be from a senior pastor, minister or priest.

    Esther and Carl Gerstacker Scholarship

    Provides scholarship awards to Junior Achievement and Hiram College.  Hiram: is an award of up to $20,000 for use by Midland County residents who are also graduates of Midland County high schools, at Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio. Previous recipients may reapply if the students are full-time and maintain at least a B average. Applicant   must provide evidence of admission to Hiram College. The essay for this scholarship should describe activities, goals, interests and jobs held. One reference from Hiram College is required for renewal applicants.   Junior Achievement: is an award for students who have participated in a Junior Achievement Program and who attend high school in Midland County.  Students must be graduating high school seniors.  Applicants will be evaluated based on their participation in Junior Achievement programs, strong moral character and community involvement.

    Gerhard and Ruth Gettel Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to a student graduating from a Midland County high school in the year of the award. The applicant must rank in the top 15% of her/his senior class. The degree of difficulty of the courses taken, plus scores on the SAT and ACT tests are factors considered. The essay for this scholarship should follow the theme, What I Want to Achieve in Life. The essay may include the answers to: Why did I select the career which I have chosen? Or if a career has not yet been chosen, what factors will influence my choice? What events or situations in my life influenced my choice of career most? Also, the essay should include involvement in school and community activities.

    W. Herman Giesler Scholarship for Chippewa Hills High School

    Provides an annual scholarship(s) award to a Chippewa Hill High School (located in Remus, Michigan) graduate who is pursuing a degree in Skilled or Advanced Technical Trades Education and Training which includes but is not limited to welding, engineering, refrigeration, heating and air conditioning, automotive service technology or mechanical or electrical engineering or someone pursuing and education in teaching in any of these fields.

    W. Herman Gieseler Scholarship

    Provides and annual scholarship award to a Midland Public High School graduate who is pursuing a degree in Skilled or Advanced Technical Trades Education and Training which includes but is not limited to machine shop, welding, engineering, refrigeration, heating and air conditioning, automotive service technology or mechanical or electrical engineering or someone pursuing and education in teaching in any of these fields.

    Tom Gilstad Bullock Creek Scholarship

    This fund has been established in memory of Tom Gilstad, who was a Bullock Creek teacher and administrator for over 30 years. The purpose of the fund is to provide an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior of Bullock Creek High School. Bullock Creek held a special place in Tom’s heart and the recipient of this scholarship must display that same love of their high school and school spirit by having participated in extracurricular activities such as but not limited to sports, band, class officer, drama or having represented their school doing volunteer work in the Bullock Creek Community.

    Gladwin Kiwanis Dallas Falls Memorial Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards for post-secondary education.  Scholarship applications will be considered from high school seniors at the following schools: Gladwin, Beaverton High School, Skeels Christian School and Gladwin home schools.  If there is not a qualified applicant at each of these schools, then more than one scholarship can be offered to the other schools.  Preference will be given to applicants with a cumulative GPA of 2.25 or higher who is involved in community service activities.  The essay for this scholarship application should describe the applicant’s community service activities and should be no longer than 400 words.

    Gladwin Rotary Ken Kerswill Endowed Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship(s) award to Gladwin County graduating senior.  Application letters for this scholarship should include how the student lives up to Rotary’s Four Way Test and how they’ve been involved in community service.  Preference will be given to students that have had family members that were Rotarians. 

    Christian T. and Margaret R. Goralski Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to students who are graduating or have graduated from a Midland County High School.  Applicants will be majoring in science, engineering, mathematics, or accounting at an accredited college or university and maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or better.  The applicant must have achieved a 3.0 GPA in high school, be active in the community and their church, and demonstrate financial need.  While all criteria must be met, financial need should be a strong priority.  Previous recipients may reapply if they are full time students who are majoring in the above fields of study and maintaining at least 3.0 GPA.

    Stephen E. Gorman Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual one-time scholarship to encourage a person less than 25 years old to attend a public college as a commuting student.  Financial need will be considered.

    Crystal Graham Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to Midland County residents who wish to study in the Health Professions field.  Preference will be given to the areas of Therapy (particularly Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapy), Physician’s Assistant, Nursing and Medicine, in that order of preference.  The scholarship may be used at either the undergraduate or graduate level.

    Great Lakes Safety Training Center Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a resident of Midland County or Gladwin County who is pursuing a degree or certification in trades, construction, manufacturing or engineering with an interest in safety.  The student must have a GPA of 2.50 or higher and provide an essay outlining why they chose their field of study and how safety has impacted or can impact their life.  One letter of reference is required; and must be from an employer or instructor whichever is applicable.

    Risha and Julius (Jay) Grosberg Scholarship

    To enable residents of Midland County over the age of 25, whose formal education has been interrupted or delayed, to re-enter a formal educational program at the undergraduate level.

    David Grosberg Memorial Scholarship

    To enable residents of Midland County to major in a health field in higher education at the undergraduate level.

    Dr. Albert A. and Caroline Gunkler Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to students who are/have graduated from a Midland County high school who are majoring in math, science or engineering at an accredited university with a grade point average of 3.0 or better.  All things being equal financial need will be the deciding factor. Preference will be given to students entering their college junior or senior years, or past recipients provided they are still majoring in the field of study described above and has maintained a GPA of 3.0 or better.

    Oscar Hahn Construction Trades Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to Midland and surrounding area High School students, or graduates, pursuing a career in construction trades.

    Lucas Hammar Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to a graduating senior from Marion High School, Marion, Michigan.

    Ray and Flora Hart Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to seniors graduating from either Midland High School or HH Dow High School in the year of the award and who will be attending Delta College.  Previous recipients who have maintained at least average grades may reapply.

    Deborah Lynn Hawkins Special Educator Scholarship

    Provides a scholarship award to Midland or Gladwin County residents who meet one of the following criteria: a) college students who are pursuing degrees in Special Education, or b) college students who are pursuing degrees in Occupational, Physical or Speech Therapy but only if their main interest area is working with special education students.  Preference will be for the former.

    Michael and Debra Hayes Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to Midland County High School graduates who have completed at least one year of college and maintained a minimum GPA of 2.5 while pursuing their undergraduate degree.  Preference will be given to students with financial need.  Scholarship recipients may reapply.

    Harold and Francine Heinze Scholarship

    Providea an annual scholarship award to an individual graduating from a Midland County High School in the year of the award, or a previous recipient of the award.  The preference will be given to those pursuing a degree in teaching, and the applicant must show financial need.

    Claxton and Mildred Helms Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County graduating senior or current college student that is pursuing a degree in education.  Preference will be given to those going into either Library Science or Art Education and students that have financial need.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    Robert Neal Hieb Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award(s) to a graduate of a Midland County high school or a current Midland County resident.  Applicants should be at least a third-year student pursuing their bachelors or master’s degree in biology, environmental science or a related field of study with preference given to students pursuing a degree in wildlife biology, conservation or management.  Preference will be given to student that have financial need.

    Freda and George Hittel Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to encourage a student who has completed two years of college studies to continue in a degree program.

    Gustav Dan Hobohm Merrill’s Marauders Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to children of veterans who have served their country in any branch of the Armed Services.  The student must have graduated from a Midland County high school and is pursuing a two year or four-year degree or a trade certification.

    James Hohmeyer Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County high school student or graduating senior involved in instrumental or choral music or who is studying music privately.  The purpose of the scholarship is to assist students as they pursue their musical endeavors or pursue further study in college.  The scholarship award may fund college as well as lessons, camp or other programs associated with their music education.

    Tom Holder “Keep Your Beak Down” Golf Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland High School graduating senior or graduate who played at least one year of varsity golf at Midland High School.  In addition, students must have a 3.0 grade point average and have engaged in at least two years of regular community service/volunteer activities in the Midland County area.  Financial need is not a factor to apply.

    Home Builders Association of Midland Scholarship

    Provides scholarships to encourage higher education in fields supporting the home building industry.

    James F. and Mary R. Hopfensperger Art Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to a graduating senior art student(s) or a past graduate of Midland Public School system pursuing an education in the visual arts, art education or visual design (including but not limited to digital, fashion, game, graphic, industrial, interactive, interior, multimedia, product, textile, visual communications, or other) degree at an institution of higher education.  The recipient must demonstrate financial need.  Grade point average is not a consideration for this scholarship.  Selection will be based on the application and in some cases a portfolio of work.  Preference will be given to first-time recipient, but previous recipients may reapply. 

    Annis Closs Horden Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to a Midland or Gladwin County student who is enrolled in a nursing program leading to a baccalaureate degree at an accredited college or university.  Previous recipients may apply.

    Horizon Bank Business Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award(s) to a Midland, Bay, Saginaw, Clare, Gladwin or Isabella County resident(s) or Horizon Bank student employee(s) to assist in the study of business at any accredited college or university, as either a full-time or part-time student.  The term “business” includes management, finance, marketing, retailing and other business related fields.  The successful applicant may be either a graduating high school senior or a current college student and must have maintained a minimum of a 3.0 GPS as a high school or college student.  The applicant must demonstrate financial need and personal efforts to finance college.  The essay for the scholarship should describe plans, career goals and specific interests and qualifications in the selected business field.

    Hornsby Aviation Education Scholarship

    Provides assistance with tuition and/or fees for flying lessons and/or pilot ground school to students ages 15 to 22 who are residents of Midland or Gladwin County or to provide a scholarship to a student who is pursuing an education in an aviation related field at a 2 year or 4-year college or university.  Preference will be given to the student taking flying lessons if applicants are of equal qualifications.

    Jeannette House Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to a Midland County resident who is enrolled in an accredited college and at the time of receiving the award will be a graduating high school senior with a literature related major in any language.

    John M. Hoy/Arline Kroeger Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to assist a student in completing a degree program in either music education, history or early childhood education.  Student should be pursuing a teaching degree and should be in either junior or senior year of college.

    Elwood J. and Helen H. Hunemorder Family Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior from Bullock Creek High School, Midland High School or H. H. Dow High School who has attended this high school for at least two years.  The applicant must have a 3.0 or higher-grade point average, display financial need and must attend a state supported four-year college or university in Michigan.

    Gerald and Phyllis Ilsley Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to a graduating senior, returning student or a non-traditional student who demonstrates financial need.  Preference will be given to those who are pursuing a course of study in the skilled trades or office professions.

    Midland – Interlochen Scholarship

    Provides scholarships for Midland County residents to attend Interlochen Fine Arts Academy.

    Don Irish Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual non-renewable scholarship to a graduate of a Midland County high school who has been accepted into an accredited college to prepare for teaching, research, or industrial applications of biology, ecology, biochemistry, wildlife management or forestry.

    James R. and Anita H. Jenkins Scholarship for African American Students

    Provides an annual scholarship award to an African American student from Midland County who is pursuing a college education.

    James R. and Anita H. Jenkins Scholarship for Native American Students

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Native American student from Midland, Bay or Saginaw Counties who is pursuing a college education with priority given to students from the Bay County Indian Education Program.  Students who meet the Office of Indian Education’s definition of “Indian” are eligible.

    Roger Jennings Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduate of Midland High School or Dow High School with a grade point average of 3.0 or better who is pursuing a bachelor degree or equivalent at a four-year college or university. The applicant must have earned a varsity letter in high school swimming or diving.

    Sharon F. Kalina Scholarship for Special Services Graduates

    Provides an annual scholarship award for graduating Midland Public Schools high school seniors or those who have graduated from the following programs: Learning Disabled (LD), Emotionally Impaired (EI), Educable Mentally Impaired (EMI), Physically or otherwise Health Impaired (POHI), Speech.  The award would be used mainly for tuition, but may also support books, fees, and supplies.

    Connie Keicher Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a senior instrument music student of Midland High School who will be attending the University of Michigan.  The candidate must demonstrate dedication and enthusiasm to the music program.  Financial need will be a consideration.  Preference will be given to a wind or percussion student.

    Lena True Memorial and Kevin and Jennifer Kendrick Scholarship

    Provides one or more scholarships in conjunction with the Midland Believes scholarship program, which provides annual scholarship awards to Midland County first generation college-going and economically disadvantaged students with preference given to candidates that have both.  This scholarship is renewable for a second year to students meeting scholarship requirements.  Recipients must be enrolled or plan on attending a Michigan educational organization.

    Della Keyworth Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduate of H. H. Dow High School who is pursuing a teaching degree with a preference to those majoring in math education.  The applicant must be active in their community, school or church; working with children or teens in a volunteer capacity is preferred but not required.

    Maureen Wright King Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland or Gladwin County resident who did not finish traditional high school, but rather earned a GED.  Preference will be for students supporting themselves; financial need is a consideration.

    Kinne-Millard Memorial Scholarship for Gladwin High School

    Provides an annual scholarship award in memory of Gladys Kinne, Margaret Millard and Rosalie Kinne-Millard to a graduate of Gladwin High School who achieved a 3.0 grade point average or better and displays a financial need and is attending a state supported Michigan college or university.  The recipient must display leadership qualities by having volunteered at Gladwin High School, in the Gladwin community or in their church.  If applicants have equivalent qualifications, preference shall be given to any such applicant who is pursuing a degree in education.

    Sarah Kowalski Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Michigan resident that is pursuing their Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing with preference given to MyMichigan Health employees.

    Jan LaCroix Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Bullock Creek High School graduating senior.  The successful applicant will be a person of compassion, concern for others, integrity and good citizenship.  They will also demonstrate involvement in their school in activities or athletics, and a commitment to volunteerism in the broader community.

    Laurence C. and Janet Glover Lang Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County resident who is either a graduating high school senior or current college student in the year of the award, and whose field of study is pharmacy.  Financial need will be a consideration.

    Bruce Lange Memorial Endowed Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduate of a Midland County or Gladwin County high school with strong preference given to a graduate of Meridian High School or Gladwin High School.  The successful applicant is one who is attending Michigan State University, is studying engineering and has already completed two years of college or more with a grade point average of 2.0 or above.  If all factors are equal, preference will be given to an individual with financial need.  This scholarship is renewable if the recipient continues to meet the scholarship guidelines.

    Laur Family Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Meridian High School graduating senior who does not smoke, drink or use illegal drugs, and who plans to attend a college (preference for Michigan public colleges) which does not issue charters for charter schools.  Students should have a minimum 2.0 GPA and financial need will be a consideration, though not a requirement.

    Katherine Kirk Lee Memorial Meteorology Endowed Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior or current college student pursuing a degree in meteorology.  Preference will be given to students with financial need and to applicants pursuing a four-year degree.

    Loretta G. Lee Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to Midland County residents who have the objective of becoming a registered nurse.  Applicants should show financial need.

    Lesh Legacy through Leadership Bullock Creek Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Bullock Creek graduating high school senior who practices philanthropy, is committed to making the world a better place, and is pursuing post-secondary education.

    Michael and Janet Leslie Memorial Youth Scholarship

    Provides a scholarship to a student who has been recommended by the Family and Friends of Michael D. Leslie and/or to promote youth leadership and citizenship within the community.  is an award to be used to promote youth leadership and citizenship within the community. The essay for this scholarship should describe youth leadership and community service.

    Grace Yu-Sheng Lo Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior from Midland High School and Dow High School who is pursuing a degree in science or engineering.  A preference will be given to a female student.

    Lowry Family Endowed Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to Midland County High School graduating senior or current college student who is pursuing an engineering degree at Michigan State University.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    Donald and Grace Irene Lyons Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to Gladwin High School graduating seniors or Gladwin High School graduates planning to attend an accredited community college, college or university.  Selection will be based on academic achievement and financial need with other factors such as extra-curricular involvement, work experience, community involvement and personal challenges taken into consideration.

    Albert T. and Margaret H. Maasberg Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a high school senior to assist him/her in pursuing higher education.  For a resident of Midland County who is a high school senior having demonstrated academic accomplishment and financial need, who will be attending a Michigan four-year college or University.  Demonstrated community service is also desirable, but not required.  The scholarship may be renewable; that is, a student may reapply for this award in subsequent years if it was originally awarded to him/her as a senior in high school.

    Jim Malek Central Michigan University STEM Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award for a senior at any Midland County high school or a graduate of any Midland County high school who will be or is attending Central Michigan University and is majoring in a STEM-related field of study (science, technology, engineering or mathematics).

    Jim Malek Delta College STEM Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award for a senior at any Midland County high school or graduate of any Midland County high school who will be or is attending Delta College and is planning to major in or is enrolled in a STEM-related field of study (science, technology, engineering or mathematics).

    Colice Pearcy Malek Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award for a senior at any Midland County high school or a graduate of any Midland  County high school who will be or is attending Central Michigan University and is majoring in education.  Preference will be given to Bullock Creek High School graduating seniors or graduates.

    Jim Malek Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award for a student majoring in electronic media/broadcasting or enrolled in an electronic media/broadcasting class or actively volunteering in the electronic media/broadcasting department at any accredited community college or university.

    Jim Malek Michigan State University Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award for a Midland High School senior or for a Midland High School graduate who will be or is attending Michigan State University and majoring in one of the following fields of study: a chemistry-related field, environmental studies or related field, or other “green” related field of study.

    Jim Malek Saginaw Valley State University STEM Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award for a senior at any Midland County high school or a graduate of any Midland County high school who will be or is attending Saginaw Valley State University and is majoring in a STEM-related field of study (science, technology, engineering or mathematics).

    Pete and Patt Marsh Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior varsity baseball player from Midland or Dow High School who is pursuing a college or vocational education.  The recipient should possess the following attributes: dedication to team, school and self, competitiveness on and off the field of play, honesty to self and others.  The recipient of this award must be a “winner”.

    Lawrence G. and Eleanor Matthews Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to students graduating from high school in Midland County and that special consideration be given to students from Meridian and Coleman High School.

    Jessie Maxwell Memorial Scholarship

    Provides one annual scholarship award to a Beaverton High School graduating high school senior and one award to a Gladwin High School graduating senior.  The successful applicants must a) be a resident of Gladwin County, and

    b) have at least a 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale, and c) be of upstanding moral character, and d) demonstrate financial need.  Preference will be given to those individuals pursuing post high school education in the area of construction or manufacturing at a community college, university, trade or technical school, or through an industry-recognized certification program.  The essay for this scholarship should describe background, achievements, financial need, and how the applicant has demonstrated upstanding moral character.

    Arthur and Martha McComb Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior, returning student or a non-traditional student who demonstrates financial need.  This scholarship is open to any course of study but preference will be given to students’ pursuing a degree in chemical process technology/chemical process operator or Child Development.  The recipient must be a graduate of a Midland or Gladwin County high school or reside in these counties.

    Mary McDonough Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to single mothers of Midland County who are raising a family on their own and pursuing a college education.  Applicants must have been a Midland County resident for at least one year.  All areas of study are open with preference to those entering the office professional/administrative assistant field.  An essay describing how the applicant qualifies for this scholarship must accompany the application.

    Marty and Jan McGuire Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior of a Midland County High School who played high school softball for at least three years and displays leadership qualities by serving in a capacity such as class officer, student council or captain of the softball team.

    Sue McKinley and Alan Williams Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduate of a Midland County high school who is attending either the University of Michigan or Michigan State University pursuing study in Chemistry, physics, mathematics, engineering or pre-medical.  Preference will be given to individuals with a high school grade point average of 3.5 or greater and those who have financial need.

    Bernie Meister Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior or graduate of a Midland County high school who is pursuing a education in a science or engineering field.  A preference will be given to students pursuing a degree in chemical engineering, chemistry, computer science or biochemistry.

    Ernesto and Virginia Mendoza Endowed Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County High School graduate or current college student who is pursuing an engineering or education degree with preference give to those that have financial need.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    Meridian Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship(s) for students graduating from Meridian High School.

    Michigan Blood – Ernie Wallace and Howard Ode Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship(s) to individual(s) who are continuing their education in a health-related field.  The recipient(s) will be a Midland County resident pursuing medical certification at an accredited college, university, or technical training facility.  An emphasis will be given to a non-traditional student who may be returning to, or entering, an institution of higher learning, or one who is currently studying in a health-related field.  Graduating high school seniors will also be given consideration.  Additional criteria include a suggested high school GPA of 3.0 or a current college GPA of 2.5.  Applicants not meeting suggested GPA requirements are encouraged to have two recognized health care professionals fill out the Scholarship Reference Form.  Recipients of the award may again apply for a scholarship in subsequent years.  These applications will be processed the same as new applicants.

    Midland Area Community Foundation FOUNDER’S Scholarship 

    The Midland Area Community Foundation FOUNDER’S Scholarship is an annual award that is intended to enable an individual with financial need to pursue occupational programs that may be completed in two years or less. One scholarship will be available for a Midland County resident and one for a Gladwin County resident. The term occupational education includes, but is not limited to, such programs as welding, automotive mechanics, nursing, office skills, electronic repair and services, and residential construction. These programs would normally require 60 credit hours or less.

    Midland Believes Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to Midland County first generation college-going and economically disadvantaged students with preference given to candidates that have both.  Preference will be given to students who have attended a Midland County High School for a minimum of two years, have a minimum GPA of 2.0 and have demonstrated community leadership or community service activities.  This scholarship is renewable for a second year and preference will be given to recipients that maintain a 3.0 GPA or higher and also take advantage of the Midland County Career and College Access Network mentorship program.  Recipients must be enrolled or plan on attending a Michigan educational organization.

    Midland Christian Church Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to traditional and non-traditional students pursuing a degree in Christian Theology or a degree that would result in a career in Christian service through an accredited Christian college.  Applicants must be a member in good standing at Midland Christian Church.

    Midland County Medical Society Alliance Scholarship

    Assists Midland County residents financially toward careers in the health field.  The scholarships are based primarily on academic merit, and community service is viewed favorably.  Each year one scholarship will be given to a nursing student in honor of Dorothy Meisel and past presidents.  Applicants must be residents of Midland County, must have a GPA of at least 3.0 and must intend to pursue a career in the health care field. They should be applying to, accepted into, or taking prerequisites for a health care program. Recipients may reapply for the award only once after initially receiving the scholarship. Essays for this scholarship should describe strengths, achievements, personal and career goals, and any involvement which demonstrates commitment to a health care field.

    Midland Lions Club Roger Maier Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduate of a Midland County high school or a current Midland County resident pursuing a bachelor’s or graduate degree in the field of vision care, audiology, or special education.  Preference will be given to a current college or graduate student studying: 1) a vision care field, 2) an audiology field, then 3) a special education field.  GPA and financial need will be taken into consideration and previous recipients may reapply.

    Midland Section American Chemical Society Scholarship

    Provides financial support to college students seeking academic degrees in the chemical sciences at college and university in the state of Michigan.  The Section’s area is Midland, Bay, Saginaw, Gratiot and Isabella Counties as of this writing, but may be expanded.  Eligible students will be those majoring in a chemical science who are entering the sophomore, junior or senior level of study and are a high school graduate from the section’s geographical area. The requirements for receiving a scholarship will be based on academic achievement and potential for contributions to the chemical sciences.

    F.L. (Larry) and Christine Mieras Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a resident of Midland or Gladwin County or a Midland or Gladwin County high school graduate or graduating senior who is pursuing a degree or certificate in architecture or building trades.  Preference will be given to students with financial need.

    Stuart Miller Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior or graduate of a Midland County high school who is attending Michigan State University and planning to enter veterinary medicine, animal science or a related-field working with animals.  The successful applicant will have a grade point average of 3.0 or above.  Financial need is not a factor.

    Beverly Milner Math Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a current college or university student who is pursuing a degree in a math related field of study with preference given to students who plan to teach math at the secondary level.  Students must be attending a college or university in the State of Michigan.  Preference will be given to students who have financial need and previous recipients may reapply.

    Beverly Milner Music Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a current college student pursuing an education in a music related field of study or incorporating music as part of their studies.  Students must be attending a college or university in the state of Michigan.  Preference will be given to students who have financial need and previous recipients may reapply.

    Beverly Milner Trades Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a student pursuing an education in skilled trades.  Students must be attending a trade school or educational institution (which can include cosmetology) in the State of Michigan.  Preference will be given to students who have financial need and previous recipients by reapply.

    Beverly Milner Veterinary Science Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a current college student in a veterinary science field of study.  Students must be attending a college or university in the State of Michigan.  This scholarship may be used for veterinary school as well as undergraduate study.  Preference will be given to students who have financial need and previous recipients may reapply.

    Ira George and Virginia Z. Morrison Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a high school senior to assist him/her in pursuing higher education.  The purpose of the fund is to finance a scholarship for a resident of Midland County who is a high school senior having demonstrated academic accomplishment and financial need.  The scholarship may be renewable; that is, a student may reapply for this award in subsequent years if it was originally awarded to him/her as a senior in high school.

    Maxwell Robert Muessig & Lynne Dion Morrison Endowed Scholarship Fund

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County Public School graduate or graduating senior of outstanding character and who is an inspiration to others.  Recipients will be involved in the community and have employment experience.  Preference will be given to students that have financial need.  Secondarily, preference may be given to students who are pursuing a certificate in a vocational, skilled trades or technical training.  The essay for this scholarship should reflect their efforts to make a difference for others and the community.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    John Mullally Family Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to assist a Coleman High School graduating senior to attend the college of their choice.

    Jenna Paige Munger Memorial Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarships to Level I and/or Level II students enrolled in the Davenport University nursing program.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    Andrew Murchison Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to allow individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities to pursue post-secondary education.

    MyMichigan Medical Center – Midland Volunteers Scholarship

    Provides a college scholarship for students who have completed at least the equivalent of one academic year in an accredited post-secondary educational institution or have been accepted into a post graduate medical curriculum.

    Northwood University Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarships to support students attending Northwood University.

    George E. Olson Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland or Gladwin County resident.  Successful applicants would be college juniors, seniors, or grad students at the time of the award, and would be majoring in an earth science related field.  Majors such as meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, forestry, etc. would be considered.  The main criteria for selection will be academic achievement, with financial need considered to a lesser degree.

    Elena Oreffice Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual, nonrenewable grant to the graduate of a Midland County high school, and rewards an understanding of and interest in the American free enterprise system.  The essay should describe the impact of free enterprise to the world and to you.

    Roy Osmun Engineering Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County Public High School graduating senior or a Midland County Public High School graduate who is now attending a college or university, who will be or is currently pursuing an engineering-related field of study.  Preference will be given to students pursuing a degree in chemical engineering.  Previous recipients are eligible to reapply.  When all criteria are equal, financial need should be a strong priority.

    Weyant M. Pangborn Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to persons who are either City of Midland classified employees or dependents thereof.

    Peele Family Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual, nonrenewable scholarship to a student athlete who demonstrates financial need and who graduates from a high school in the city of Midland in the year of the award.

    Pendell Family Scholarship

    Provides Midland county residents the opportunity to earn a business degree at Northwood University, Midland, Michigan.

    Lyle and Delbert Pevitt Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to encourage a person who is preparing for a career in a human health field.  The recipient may reapply in following years and receive equal consideration with other applicants.

    Reed Phillips Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award for post-secondary education to a Bullock Creek High School senior or Bullock Creek High School graduate who has been involved in High School athletics with preference given to those with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and participation in leadership activities.

    Gwendolyn Bennett Pike Vocal Music Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award, first to a graduating senior (based on vocal merit rather than financial need) who plans to major in voice performance or music education with a voice/choral major.  In the event there is no qualified senior applicant, the scholarship could be awarded to an otherwise qualified student who would be already attending college.  The successful applicant will be either a student attending or having graduated from a Midland County Public or Parochial High School, or is a voice student of a Midland county voice teacher.

    The Pilgrim Technology Women in Business Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award for higher education to a woman residing in Midland County, and who has a vision of remaining in or returning to Midland County following completion of her education.  Graduating high school seniors (not home-schooled students), current college students, and/or adult/nontraditional students may apply.  The successful applicant will have demonstrated financial need, successful academic achievement, and will be studying in a business field with a plan to eventually become an entrepreneur.  A preference will be given to students who have some history of extracurricular activities and/or service through their institution or community organizations.

    Miriam Pillos Memorial Endowed Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a high school student who is living in or studying dance in Midland County to attend lessons or camps.

    Nancy Pollack Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to Gladwin or Midland County High School graduate or current college student that has a passion for music and has participated in or been a member of their school orchestra, band or choir.   Preference will be given to students that are pursuing a musical field of study.

    Ralph and Faye Prescott Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual college scholarship for “Midland County high school graduates who seek a degree in scientific disciplines such as chemistry, physics, biology and the like.

    George A. Rapanos Endowed Scholarship

    Provides one or more scholarships in conjunction with the Midland Believes scholarship program, which provides annual scholarship awards to Midland County first generation college-going and economically disadvantaged students with preference given to candidates that have both.  This scholarship is renewable for a second year to students meeting scholarship requirements.  Recipients must be enrolled or plan on attending a Michigan educational organization.

    Sheriff John S. Reder Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating high school senior of a Midland County high school with preference to a student from Bullock Creek, Coleman or Meridian high school.  The successful applicant will be planning a career in law enforcement, corrections, probation, emergency medical technician or physician’s assistant or related fields.  Academic achievement and financial need are both considerations.

    Jack Redman DDS Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County high school graduate who has declared a pre-dental college major and has accumulated college credits to have completed their sophomore year.  Dr. Redman was committed to his profession for 36 years.  Therefore, the recipient must display this same dedication by having maintained a GPA of 3.2 or higher, participated in extracurricular activities and held a part-time or summer job.

    Stephen D. Redman, M.D. Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship for a resident of Midland County who has been attending college and is a student preparing for a career in human health.  Preference will be given to persons attending or planning to attend a medical school with the intention to practice in primary care.

    Robert B. Reinhart and Jean W. Reinhart Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County high school graduate or graduating senior (I.e. from any high school located in Midland County) who is enrolled in or planning to enroll in any college or university in the state of Michigan.  The scholarship shall be based on a combination of academic achievement, extra-curricular activities and community service.

    Esther Keeley Rodabaugh Foreign Language Endowed Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Beaverton High School graduate or graduating senior who is pursuing a degree in the field of humanities with preference give to students pursuing a degree related to foreign language(s).  Applicants much have a 3.0 GPA and previous recipients may reapply.

    Brent L. Romain Scholarship

    Provides an annual college scholarship award, to be used for tuition only, to a graduating high school senior who is also a member of the Boys Varsity Soccer Team at Dow High School.  If at some point the fund grows large enough to offer additional scholarships, members of the other soccer organizations could also be considered.  Academics and character will be the deciding criteria for this award.

    Pamela J. Rowe Music Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a flute student to attend camp, take private lessons, purchase a flute or attend college studying music with an emphasis on flute.  Selection of the recipient will be handled by the Midland Concert Band under a process approved by the Midland Area Community Foundation.

    Stanford H. Rowe Music Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a low brass student to attend a camp, take private lessons, purchase a low brass instrument or attend college studying music with an emphasis on low brass. 

    Louis “Bud” C. Rubens Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County high school graduating senior or current college student who will be or is currently pursuing a chemistry, physics or biology related field of study.  Preference will be given to applicants with financial need, a cumulative high school GPA of 3.5 and to those involved in leadership and community activities.  Scholarship recipients may reapply.

    Jane Catherine Rubens Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County resident.

    Rupprecht Family Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County or Dow College Opportunity Program graduate who is currently a junior or senior-level college student pursuing a STEM (Science Technology Engineering Math) related field of study.  Preference should be given to graduates of the Dow College Opportunity Program at West Midland Family Center, grade point will be taken into consideration in the selection process and scholarship recipients may reapply.

    John W. Ryan Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior or a Midland County High School or current college student who will be completing a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) related class at Delta College and is planning to pursue a STEM related field of study.  Preference given to those with financial need and scholarship recipients may reapply.

    Delia Sandow Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior or graduate of a Midland County or Gladwin County High School with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above who is studying veterinary science or an agriculture-related field of study.  Scholarship recipients can reapply for subsequent years.

    Eric B. Schaper Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduate of Midland Public Schools who is studying engineering and has maintained a 3.0 grade point average.

    Chad Schieber Memorial Scholarship Fund

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a student pursuing a degree or certification in law enforcement, criminal justice, or traffic safety.  Preference will be given to students attending the police academy at Delta College.

    Sue “Dominowski” Schindler Scholarship

    Provides an annual, one-time scholarship award to a graduating senior from a Midland County public high school.  Preference will be for those graduating from Bullock Creek High School.  The recipient must have declared and demonstrated an interest in pursuing a career in teaching.

    William H. Schuette Memorial Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship award(s) to student(s) graduating from Midland County high schools in the year of the award, pursuing higher education in a science-related field such as chemistry, physics, biology, etc.

    John and Bev Schwartz Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Bullock Creek High School senior or graduate with a cumulative high school GPA of 3.2.  The applicant must be pursuing either an education degree in one of the STEM (science, technology, engineering & math) fields or an accounting degree at a Michigan two or four year college or university.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    Curtis and Barbara Shaffner Family Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduate of Bullock Creek High School who displays a financial need and is pursuing an education in a field supporting the home building industry or commercial/industrial trade industry.

    Matthew W. Shephard Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior from Meridian High School who participated in the band program with a GPA of 3.0 or better.

    Joe and Ethel Simek Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a Midland County High School graduate or graduating senior who will be or is planning on attending Michigan State University and pursuing a degree in a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) related field of study.  Preference will be given to students pursuing a natural science degree.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    Jenifer Turner Sisco Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a senior at Midland High School who motivates others to give back, inspires other students, demonstrates school spirit, participates in extracurricular academic arts programs, and/or achieves success through overcoming challenges.

    Eugene B. Skeebo Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a non-traditional or traditional student (graduating senior or current college student) who is working while attending college.  Non-traditional students may be beginning or continuing post-high school education after being in the work force for a number or years.  Applicants may plan to attend college on a full or part-time basis, including both day and/or night classes.  Preference will be given to those working toward a business degree with an emphasis in finance, accounting or banking.

    Larry C. Smith Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to an intermediate, middle school, or junior high school student in the Midland Public Schools to attend the Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp.  Significant consideration would be given to students who could most benefit from this experience and who also have financial need.

    Stafford/Rusch Medical Scholarship Fund

    Provides an annual scholarship award(s) to Midland County graduating seniors or current post-secondary students who are pursuing a degree or certificate in a medical or health related field of study.  Traditional and non-traditional or alternative fields of study may be considered.  Preference will be given to students who have financial need and are attending Delta College.

    Stafford/Rusch Midland Believes Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to Midland County first generation college-going and economically disadvantaged students, with preference given to candidates who are in both categories. Preference will be given to students who have attended a Midland County High School for a minimum of two years, have a minimum GPA of 2.0 and have demonstrated community leadership or community service activities.

    This scholarship is renewable for a second year and preference will be given to recipients that maintain a 3.0 GPA or higher and also take advantage of the Midland County Career and College Access Network mentorship program. Recipients must be enrolled or plan on attending a Michigan educational organization.

    Steve Marsh/Terry Stanton Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to two Midland County high school senior student-athletes, one male and one female, who have demonstrated excellence in competition, in the classroom, and in the community and are planning to continue their education beyond high school.  Students must have a 3.0 grade point average, demonstrate community involvement and have played a sport including during their senior year.

    Thomas L. Staples Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to an individual graduating from a Midland County public high school in the year of the award who intends to pursue science or engineering in higher education.  Financial need is not a factor.

    Daniel G. and Ida M. Stevens Agricultural Scholarship

    To continue the wonderful work which was accomplished by the Midland/Midland, Alabama Agriculture Scholarship Fund which is no longer viable. After the flood of 1986, farmers in Midland City, Alabama collected monies which were sent to Midland, Michigan as an expression of appreciation for the hay which had been sent to them by the citizens of Midland, Michigan during their drought of 1986. These monies were used to provide an annual, nonrenewable grant to the graduate of a Midland County high school for the purpose of post high school study in an accredited college, trade or technical school in agriculture education. When these monies had been fully utilized, the Stevens Family, recognizing the value of this scholarship, decided to provide funding for it themselves and, in a 2008 amendment, later expanded the scholarship to include both Midland and Gladwin County students.

    Edith Irene (Stinchcombe) Gieseler Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduate of Midland Public Schools who is pursuing an education in horticulture, floriculture or floral design or early elementary education.

    Robert and Barbara Stoppert Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a junior or senior in college who has been admitted to a College of Education and plans to become an educator.  Successful applicants will have graduated from a Midland County high school and will have a positive record of community service and/or extra-curricular activities.  Previous recipients of the scholarships are encouraged to reapply.

    Howard G. Swift, III Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to an individual who is looking for a “second chance” by seeking higher education.  Usually this person will be older than the typical college freshman, will have financial need, and will have experienced significant difficulties and/or hardships in their life.

    Irene T. Takahashi Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual, nonrenewable grant to the graduate of a Midland County high school for the purpose of further study in chemistry or a closely related science.

    Taylor University Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to assist a student to attend Taylor University.

    Betty Thompson-Shuler Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior from Meridian High School who is pursuing a teaching degree in English, a general teaching degree or a degree with a major in English.  A preference will be given to a student pursuing a teaching degree in English.

    Kirsten Beth Triebes Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship to encourage a college student to complete preparation for a career in engineering or in a health field.

    John A. Trumbell Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship for students graduating from Bullock Creek High School.                          

    Dale Waller Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual, nonrenewable scholarship to a graduate of a Midland County high school enrolled in a college vocational curriculum.

    Anne Marie Walsh Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating high school senior, current college student, or student returning to college, including nontraditional students, to pursue a bachelor’s degree in nursing or master’s degree in nursing.  Preference will be given to those planning to pursue a career in neonatal nursing.

    Richard G. Waterman Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior or a graduate of a Midland County high school who is pursuing an education in a science or engineering field.  Preference will be given to students pursuing a degree in chemical engineering.

    Talisa J. Waterman Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior or a graduate of a Midland County high school who is pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing.

    Jay Weaver Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior from Bay City Western High School who will be a business major, who displays financial need, and who will be a commuting student.

    West Midland Family Center / Dow College Opportunity Scholarship

    Provides scholarships for participants in the Dow College Opportunity Program to pursue both academic and vocational courses of study.

    Donald R. Weyenberg Memorial Scholarship

    Provides scholarships to outstanding graduating seniors in Midland County so they might pursue degrees with majors in the field of chemistry or biochemistry from accredited universities as full-time students.  Previous recipients of the scholarship may reapply, and all else being equal, will be given preference.

    Ken and Irma Wildes Memorial Nursing Scholarship

    Provides financial support for a person whose ultimate goal is earning a bachelor’s degree as a registered nurse (RN).  Up to two scholarships are available this year.  Successful applicants must be college-bound seniors graduating from Midland or Gladwin County high schools in the year of the award, or current college students who are residents of Midland or Gladwin County.  They must demonstrate financial need, must be accepted by an accredited college with a school of nursing, and must be pursuing the ultimate goal of a bachelor’s degree.  The essay for this scholarship should describe activities, goals, interests and jobs held.

    Judge James E. “Pinky” Wilson Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to graduates of Midland County high schools (public or private/parochial) or those who have been Midland County residents for at least a year.  It is intended to assist students in pursuit of a Baccalaureate degree.  Successful applicants will be those most likely to share and act upon Judge Wilson’s philosophy that we should “expand the bridge of opportunity” for others, and to “reach back to help those less fortunate to make the same journey.”

    Sadie Wolf Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a nurse who has completed an associate’s degree and is pursuing a bachelor’s degree.  In addition, this can also be used by a bachelor’s degreed nurse who is pursuing a master’s degree.  Preference will be given to those that demonstrate financial need.  Previous recipients may reapply.

    Woman’s Study Club 100th Anniversary Scholarship

    Provides a scholarship award for a woman to attend a leadership camp or seminar with preference given to those attending Camp Miniwanca.

    Richard E. Woodward Family Engineering Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a resident of Midland or Gladwin County that has completed at least two years of college, pursuing a bachelor’s or graduate degree in engineering; including but not limited to chemical, mechanical, industrial or electrical engineering.  The applicant must have at least a 3.0 GPA and have demonstrated ambition and leadership in the field of engineering through involvement in extra-curricular activities, work experience or community service.  One reference must be from a college instructor or professor.

    Eugene C. and Mildred G. Yehle Scholarship

    Provides scholarship awards to encourage Midland County residents to continue their education beyond high school toward a “skilled or technical career”. Preference will be given to persons who want to find employment in the field of health care in Midland County and to persons already so employed who seek advancement in their careers.  Applicants should have an aptitude for their chosen field, financial need, and integrity.  Previous recipients may reapply for up to three additional years of education, assuming acceptable academic performance.

    Alice B. and Earl E. Ziegler Scholarship

    Assists with the cost of tuition, books and fees for college students in preparation for a career in early childhood education.  It is for a resident of Midland County who has completed at least 48 semester credit hours of college. The student must be enrolled full time in a curriculum for early childhood education at the time the award is received.

    Zonta Club of Midland Scholarship

    Provides annual scholarship awards to women of all ages pursuing career goal that will positively impact the status of women.  The scholarships may be used at any post-secondary education institution.  The scholarships are for women re-entering the workforce or who are in the workforce going back to school. Those entering/vocational certification directly from high school will be considered as well.  Applicants must have been a Midland County resident for at least one year. Previous recipients may reapply. 

    The successful applicant will have achieved at least a 2.5 GPA.  Preference will be given to women who have supported, and/or plan to support through their education, the advancement of women.  Award will be based on financial need, work/life skills, community service/extra-curricular activities (depending on the situation of the applicant), GPA/GED, honors/awards, and references.

    Cristoforo and Alma Zuliani Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award(s) to a Midland County high school graduate who is pursuing a degree in STEM (science, technology, engineering, or math) at an accredited four-year university or college in Michigan or at Delta College (or another approved two-year college in plant communities serving Dow Chemical employees).  Students must have graduated with a cumulative GPA over 2.5 and demonstrate financial need.  This is a one-year renewable scholarship and recipients that maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above will be awarded a consecutive scholarship for their second year of study.

    Corporal Casey P. Zylman Memorial Scholarship

    Provides an annual scholarship award to a graduating senior(s) of Coleman High School.  The applicant must have a 3 point or higher-grade point average and played a sport in all four years of high school.  The applicant must display leadership qualities such as being a member of the National Honor Society or holding a class officer position and display financial need.  Along with the application the applicant must also include an essay on their leadership qualities and how they qualify them for this scholarship.

    Takeaways from Tallahassee — Shattering glass ceilings

    Mission accomplished

    Salesia V. Smith-Gordon is giving back to her alma mater. And in return, her alma mater — Florida State University — is thanking her publicly.

    The Florida State University College of Law is hanging a portrait of Smith-Gordon in its rotunda on Thursday, marking the first Black alumna to be recognized in this fashion.

    A West Palm Beach personal injury trial attorney, Smith-Gordon made a $200,000 gift to the law school to help seed an endowment that will provide scholarships for Black law students and support greater cultural diversity in the college. It is the largest gift a Black alumna has ever given FSU’s law school.

    The mother-daughter duo of Jeraldine Williams and Salesia Smith-Gordon have already made school history. Image via FSU.

    “As an African American female lawyer, I felt it was of the utmost importance to find a way to help ensure that Black students, especially women, had the support and resources needed for academic success,” she said in a prepared statement.

    While Smith-Gordon is the first Black alumna to be recognized with a portrait in the rotunda, she’s already made school history. Her mother, Jeraldine Williams, graduated from FSU Law in 1981. And when Smith-Gordon graduated in 1992 she became a part of school history being one half of the first mother-daughter pair to graduate from the College of Law.

    Smith-Gordon helped launch the Black Alumni Network (BAN) in 2021 with the goal of creating increased opportunities for Black students to attend law school and to increase diversity on the College of Law’s campus.

    FSU College of Law opened in 1966 and the Honorable Zebedee Wright was the first Black person to graduate in 1971. In a promotional video for BAN last year Smith-Gordon said 591 Black students had graduated since.

    “That’s not a small number,” she said at the time. “But it’s not a large number either in comparison.”

    Her goals for BNA in the first year included highlighting the success both in and out of the courtroom that FSU College of Law Black alumni have enjoyed. She also wanted the members of BAN to work to encourage Black students to attend the law school and to provide the support they need to retain them.

    And her last goal?

    “We will have an endowed scholarship to show that we didn’t just walk through these halls but we thrived in spite of them,” she said.

    Mission accomplished.

    ___

    Coming up, the usual assortment of news, intel and observations from the week that was in Florida’s capital city by Peter Schorsch, Drew Wilson, Renzo DowneyChristine Jordan Sexton and the staff of Florida Politics.

    But first …

    Take 5

    The “Takeaway 5” — the Top 5 stories from the week that was:

    Backlash continues over migrant flights — Resistance against Gov. Ron DeSantis’ decision to send flights of immigrants to Martha’s Vineyard continued mounting this week. Venezuelan migrants flown to the Massachusetts island sued DeSantis and the Transportation Secretary on Tuesday for engaging in a “fraudulent and discriminatory scheme” to relocate them. Charlie Crist continued condemning the “political stunt.” Sen. Jason Pizzo filed a lawsuit to block DeSantis from continuing the program. There was also a flare-up over a flight scheduled to land near President Joe Biden’s Delaware home, which DeSantis reportedly canceled to “punk” the media. Although former President Donald Trump dodged a question about the flights, Jared Kushner criticized the move during a Fox News sitdown: “Seeing them being used as political pawns one way or the other is very troubling to me.”

    Judge denies motion to reinstate Andrew Warren — Federal Judge Robert Hinkle on Monday rejected a request from Warren to reinstate him as Hillsborough State Attorney and overturn DeSantis’ move to suspend him from office over a pledge he made not to prosecute abortion-related crimes. While Hinkle rejected the injunction, he scrutinized the state’s argument and opted instead to hold a trial on the matter. Hinkle expressed concern about “yo-yo-ing” the office if he were to reinstate Warren, then DeSantis appeals and the Governor’s chosen replacement, Susan Lopez, is put back in.

    DeSantis wants further crackdown on Chinese influence — DeSantis signed an executive order Thursday prohibiting state agencies from contracting with Chinese-based companies for projects that could allow them to access Floridians’ personal data. It’s part of a broader crackdown on the Chinese government’s attempts to “infiltrate” institutions throughout the country. DeSantis also said he’ll push the Legislature next year to ban gifts from certain “malign” foreign countries, such as China, Russia, Cuba and Iran, to higher education institutions. The proposal follows a law DeSantis promoted for last year’s Legislative Session, which requires universities and colleges to disclose any gifts worth more than $50,000.

    DeSantis floats $1.1B tax cut aimed at kids’ items — Flush with a $20 billion surplus, padded with the federal COVID-19 stimulus, DeSantis wants lawmakers next year to pass another large tax cut plan, which he says will save families $1.1 billion. The proposal largely targets eliminating the sales tax on items for babies and small children, including diapers, toys, cribs, strollers and children’s books. Lawmakers passed a one-year exemption on sales taxes on diapers and clothes for babies this year, but DeSantis wants to make it permanent. That provision is estimated to save consumers $133 million.

    Florida asks SCOTUS to visit social media ruling — Florida is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to protect Florida’s social media “deplatforming” law after appeals courts issued conflicting rulings. Attorney General Ashley Moody filed an appeal on Wednesday asking the Court to overturn a ruling from the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, which in May displaced the law on First Amendment grounds. However, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a conflicting ruling just last week over a similar Texas law, putting the issue on a path destined for the nation’s high court. The internet groups that brought the cases in both states are on board with taking the matter to the high court.

    Young entrepreneurs

    DeSantis awarded $1.9 million to benefit entrepreneurship and training programs at eight state colleges and 17 school districts in the Sunshine State.

    The funding, announced Thursday, will help students learn about how to run a small business and connect them with available opportunities in their area. The awards will create and support programs at colleges, high schools and middle schools.

    “Becoming a business owner is one of the best ways to achieve economic mobility,” DeSantis said in a recorded video, “and in Florida, we have created a climate that allows small businesses to thrive.”

    On top of a booming small business industry, which DeSantis credited to the state’s economic policies since 2020, the Governor touted Florida’s education system as the best in the world for entrepreneurship education and training.

    More than 20,000 Florida students have earned an industry certification in Entrepreneurship and Small Business (ESB), mostly since 2020. Florida represents about half of all ESB certificates earned in the United States since the certificate was first launched in 2017.

    “Under Governor DeSantis’ leadership, Florida has led the way in ensuring our students have adequate skills-based training through Career and Technical Education programs,” Commissioner of Education Manny Díaz said in a prepared statement. “These programs are rigorous, in-demand and allow students the opportunity to dive into a career quickly and without debt.”

    Force quit

    Attorney General Ashley Moody continued her push to silence the annoying robots bugging Floridians around the clock.

    Though not as pesky as the top-of-the-line models from Hyperdyne or Cyberdyne, robocallers have hijacked the U.S. telephone, and the dissolute companies behind them are raking in billions from Americans through fraudulent schemes. They’re costing law enforcement and telecom companies a bundle, too.

    Ashley Moody is as fed up as you are with robocalls. Image via AP.

    Moody is hoping to stop the bots by advocating for more rigorous enforcement by the Federal Communications Commission. So, she joined 50 other Attorneys General this week to support a proposed rule change regarding “gateway providers,” which are essentially the switchboard operators giving bots bogus numbers and an all-access pass to the phone network.

    The new rule would expand a recent FCC change to get the few holdout phone companies that, although largely invisible to the public, are exclusively responsible for routing fraudulent and illegal calls across the U.S. phone network, regardless of where the calls originate.

    The rule would also force companies to respond to law enforcement traceback requests within 24 hours and block illegal traffic as soon as possible.

    “I am joining attorneys general from across the nation urging the FCC to strengthen federal rules to ensure gateway providers are doing everything they can to protect Americans from unlawful robocalls,” Moody said.

    Safe Fiona relief

    Following the devastating effects of Hurricane Fiona on Puerto Rico, Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried is providing tips on how Floridians can safely help support those affected.

    Most charities soliciting within Florida are required to register and file financial information with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). While it is up to donors to determine if their contribution will be spent the way they intend, the department makes it easier for donors to access that information by making registration and financial documentation available online at FloridaConsumerHelp.com.

    U.S. citizens in Puerto Rico need help after Hurricane Fiona. Image via AP.

    Fried and FDACS “encourage Floridians looking to support recovery efforts to review our list of best practices to avoid scams and sham charities so that your generosity can make the most impact possible for our neighbors in need,” she said in a statement.

    FDACS lists a few tips to help donors stay safe, including using its Check-a-Charity tool, googling the organization’s name to check for complaints, scams and reviews, asking how much of the donation goes to administrative costs, paying with a credit card or check and not giving in to pressure to donate immediately — a possible sign of an illegitimate charity.

    “We are praying for the strength and safety of our fellow Americans in Puerto Rico impacted by Hurricane Fiona,” Fried said. “This most recent storm has caused widespread devastation to the island’s infrastructure and residents that are still recovering five years after being struck by Hurricane Maria, a deadly category 5 storm.”

    Storm’s a-brewin’

    With South Florida looking down the barrel of a possible hurricane, it’s time to re-up calls for hurricane preparedness.

    Tropical Storm Ian is expected to strengthen into a hurricane and make landfall in Southwest Florida in the coming days, the tail end of is National Preparedness Month. Floridians hopefully took advantage of the first four weeks of September to do their hurricane prep, but it’s not too late to fill your pantries and gas tanks.

    Jimmy Patronis wants Floridians to protect their lives — and their property.

    On Thursday, back when the tropical system was known as Invest 98L, Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis urged people to begin preparing for the storm, which projections predict will make landfall mid-week.

    “The height of the 2022 Hurricane Season is upon us and right now there are multiple storms brewing in the Atlantic that we are monitoring closely; particularly Invest 98L,” Patronis said in a statement. “I am urging Floridians not to wait until the storm begins to approach the state, but to gather hurricane materials and personal essentials before it’s too late.”

    The 2022 National Preparedness Month theme is “A Lasting Legacy.”

    “Hurricanes are dangerous and unpredictable and that is why you need to prepare now to protect you and your family and leave ‘a lasting legacy’ of preparedness for future generations to follow,” Patronis continued. “When it comes to disasters, having a plan is vital and our Emergency Preparedness Toolkit is designed to help you prepare a home inventory and organize your financial information to ensure you can recover from a storm quickly.”

    PrepareFL.com contains storm resources and preparedness tips like conducting a home inventory, securing flood insurance coverage, ensuring adequate coverage, considering additional living expense coverage and not waiting until storms approach. Property insurance companies do not accept new applications or requests to increase coverage once a hurricane nears Florida, Patronis warned.

    Instagram of the Week

    The Week in Appointments

    Judicial Qualifications Commission — DeSantis named Jonathan Bronitsky and Michelle Montanaro to the commission, which is charged with investigating allegations of misconduct by justices and judges. The Governor must appoint non-attorneys to the fifteen-member commission. Bronitsky, of Delray Beach, is the co-founder and CEO of Athos Media Strategies and is the former chief speechwriter for U.S. Attorney General William Barr and former senior adviser at the U.S. Department of Justice. Montanaro, of Tallahassee, is a paralegal at Shutts & Bowen. She previously served as a judicial assistant at the 2nd Judicial Circuit Court. Both were appointed to serve the remainder of a term expiring Dec. 31, 2026.

    Judicial Nominating Commissions — The Governor made four appointments and reappointments to the state’s Judicial Nominating Commissions. Attorney Shelley Reynolds, of Pensacola, was appointed to the 1st Judicial Circuit JNC. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of West Florida and her law degree from Florida State University. Natalie Christmas, of Tallahassee, was appointed to the 2nd Judicial Circuit JNC. Christmas is the assistant Attorney General of Legal Policy for the Office of the Attorney General. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Florida and her law degree from Vanderbilt University. Shumaker, Loop and Kendrick partner Hunter Norton, of Sarasota, was reappointed to the 12th Judicial Circuit JNC. He received his bachelor’s degree from Regents College and his law degree from the University of Miami. Tyson & Mendes partner Charles Reynolds II, of Tampa, was appointed to the 13th Judicial Circuit JNC. He received his bachelor’s degree and law degree from Mercer University.

    Brevard County Supervisor of Elections — DeSantis appointed Timothy Bobanic as Brevard County Supervisor of Elections, effective Oct. 1. Bobanic, of Melbourne, is the director of information technology and election services for the Brevard County Supervisor of Elections, a position he has held since 2013. He was previously the director of information technology for the Hillsborough County Supervisor of Elections. A master Florida certified election professional, Bobanic earned his bachelor’s degree in management information systems from the University of South Florida.

    Cancer Connect

    First Lady and breast cancer survivor Casey DeSantis says Florida’s centralized website for those battling cancer has been updated with a full Spanish translation.

    Florida Cancer Connect now features a translated site plus testimonials from Hispanic cancer survivors, recorded and produced in both Spanish and English. Those videos will premier over the next month, and existing English testimonials will have Spanish subtitles available.

    Casey DeSantis has made her new cancer portal bilingual.

    DeSantis hopes adding a full Spanish translation and Spanish testimonials will allow the webpage to reach more Floridians and spread awareness on the resources available across the state.

    “Florida Cancer Connect is an extension of our longstanding commitment to all Floridians impacted by cancer,” the First Lady said in a statement. “Our goal is to make cancer resources user friendly, which is why I’m excited to announce the addition of readily available Spanish resources to increase the accessibility of support to those in the cancer fight looking for help and hope.”

    Florida, as the third-largest state, is second in the nation for newly diagnosed cancer cases.

    Florida Cancer Connect launched last month as an initiative of the First Lady, who was declared cancer free earlier this year. The website provides information on cancer treatment, caregiver tools and stories from brave Floridians who have fought the disease.

    Take the Power Back

    The Public Service Commission will meet next week to discuss proposed changes to a 30-year-old rule that clean energy advocates say will entrench the harm that causes Floridians’ higher bills.

    The PSC will hold a rulemaking workshop on Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. to hear from stakeholders, the public and power companies regarding its draft rule on setting energy efficiency goals. Clean energy advocates at the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy are billing the meeting as an electric showdown between customers and the state’s biggest power companies, a rage against the machine.

    In the right light, study becomes insight.

    “Thousands of comments have been filed by customers demanding that the commission reform its outdated practices,” said George Cavros, the Florida director and energy policy attorney for the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. “Despite mounting public criticism, the commission’s most recent draft rule would cement the status quo and further burden hard-working Floridians with higher power bills. This workshop is the perfect arena for Florida families to make their voices heard.”

    The current rule, which has been in place since 1993, outlines the process by which utility companies propose 10-year goals and the PSC sets those goals. Among other changes, the proposed rule asks each utility to file a technical potential study that would be used to develop demand-side management, conservation and efficiency benchmarks.

    Know the date

    Florida families can celebrate Gold Star Family Day this Sunday.

    DeSantis this week signed a proclamation declaring the last Sunday of the month Gold Star Family Day honoring the mothers, fathers and siblings of someone who died in the line of duty.

    Since World War I, a “Gold Star Family” has signified a family that has lost one of its members in combat. The family can display a Gold Star Service Flag for any military family members who have died from any honorable cause. Each gold star on the flag signifies a death.

    Gold Star Family Day is an opportunity to honor those who lost loved ones in the line of duty. Image via AP.

    Though not as well known as Memorial Day, Congress in 1936 declared the last Sunday in September as “Gold Star Mother’s Day.” Former President Barack Obama in 2011 amended the declaration, declaring the day to include families as well as mothers.

    Today, the holiday includes any immediate family member and authorizes that person to display the Gold Star Service Flag.

    Florida will fly the Honor and Remember Flag in honor of the state’s Gold Star Families. According to the Governor’s proclamation, there are about 1,200 Gold Star license plates in circulation in the state as of this month.

    “We honor all Gold Star Families and throughout the nation for their courage and tenacity in the face of the tremendous sacrifices made by their loved ones,” the proclamation notes.

    Showered in care

    From 9 a.m. to noon, Rep. Tracie Davis will help Northeast Florida Healthy Start Coalition put on its sixth annual community baby shower in Jacksonville.

    The free event, held at the nonprofit’s The Magnolia Project building near Jacksonville University, will help connect new and expectant mothers with the tools they need to raise happy and healthy kids. The program also seeks to raise awareness for the high infant mortality numbers in Jacksonville.

    Tracie Davis is running for Senate and running a program to help new moms. Image via Colin Hackley.

    In 2019, 136 infants died before their first birthday locally. In 2020, the city’s infant mortality rate was 7.8 — a number higher than the state rate, 5.8, and the national rate, 5.6.

    “Bringing our community together to provide our new and expectant mothers with the tools they need to care for their newborn is invaluable,” Davis said. “For the sixth year in a row, it has been my pleasure to surround these families with the love, education and encouragement that is key to establishing a solid foundation and bright future for all of our children.”

    The baby shower is a free drive-thru and walk up event. The Northeast Florida Healthy Start Coalition is a nonprofit dedicated to reducing infant death and improving the health of pregnant women, babies, fathers and their families.

    Health and wellness

    Rep. Anna V. Eskamani and Orlando City Commissioner Bakari Burns are lending their efforts today to the 19th Annual Caribbean Health Summit, where participants can get screened for blood pressure, cholesterol, body mass index, prostate specific antigen, Alzheimer’s, as well as HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.

    Participants also will be offered dental and vision screenings as well as a mental wellness check.

    Anna V. Eskamani and crew are holding the event from 10 a.m. till 3 p.m.

    “Make Mental Wellness a Lifestyle” is the theme of this year’s event, which is hosted by the Center for Multicultural Wellness and Prevention in collaboration with the Caribbean American Chamber of Commerce of Florida, the Orange County Department of Health, Advent Health and Florida Hospital.

    “This event is the only one of its kind with a crucial focus on the physical and mental health and wellbeing of our community. In Tallahassee and back home in Central Florida, we’re doing everything we can to reduce barriers to accessing healthcare and invite our family, friends, and neighbors to take advantage of this great opportunity for care,” Eskamani said in a prepared statement.

    The free event kicks off at 10 a.m. at the Dr. James R. Smith Center and ends at 3 p.m.

    Self love

    The Capital City now has a “Wall of Honor” celebrating the history of Leon County’s property appraisers.

    “The display honors the past, present, and future achievements of the property appraiser’s office,” Leon County Property Appraiser Akin Akinyemi said at the unveiling. “Each of the individuals depicted on the display have made great contributions through their service to Leon County residents and property owners. Their legacies deserve to be remembered and celebrated.”

    Akin Akinyemi is honoring those who came before him.

    Joining Akinyemi at the unveiling ceremony were former Leon County Property Appraiser Bert Hartsfield and wife, Lin Hartsfield. Nearly 25 years after getting elected, Hatsfield, who is credited with modernizing the office, announced his resignation. Akinyemi was elected his successor in 2016.

    Additionally, Hartsfield’s predecessor, former Leon County Property Appraiser Clarence Cleveland “Dick” Brand also attended the celebration as did former Leon County Court Clerk Dave Lang, city Treasurer-Clerk Jim Cooke and Director of Records Management Matt Lutz.

    The property appraiser’s office is charged with appraising all real and personal property, administering property exemptions and classifications, processing deeds, and sending notices of proposed property taxes. The annual tax roll that is produced is used to develop the budgets of Tallahassee, Leon County, public schools, water management districts and special districts including health care.

    Hall of Fame bound

    Scott Price is a second generation Florida State University College of Business alumnus, and in October will be inducted into its Hall of Fame — one of only three graduates who have received the honor.

    Price, who graduated with his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in accounting from FSU in 1997, recently awarded a $2.7 million gift to the College of Business, of which $2 million will be directed to the Scott G. Price and Family Endowed Scholarship in Accounting.

    Scott Price completed FSU bachelor’s and master’s degrees in accounting during the same year, 1997. Graphic via FSU.

    The endowment will fund nine credit hours to high-performing accounting undergraduates that can be applied toward requirements for both their bachelor’s degree and FSU’s Master of Accounting, or MAcc. It also includes the Scott G. Price MAcc Scholarships, an endowment that will fund eight Price Scholars annually and provide about 50% of their program tuition cost.

    Michael Hartline, dean of the College of Business, said the Price Accounting Scholars Program will allow the college to recruit the best and brightest accounting students. The Department of Accounting already boasts the nation’s No. 21-ranked program among public universities, according to U.S. News and World Report.

    Moreover, Price earmarked $700,000 to name a seating area and signature connector in Legacy Hall, the future home of the College of Business, the Scott G. Price and Family Forum Stairs. The $700,000 comes on top of $300,000 Price had already given for Legacy Hall naming.

    Price is able to be generous because he launched A-LIGN, a Tampa-based cybersecurity company that boasts a global workforce of more than 600 employees and has more than 3,500 global clients, including Alloy, Sprint and Raymond James.

    In February, the Seminole 100 recognized A-LIGN — for a fifth straight year — as one of the fastest-growing companies owned or led by an FSU graduate.

    “FSU has been a part of my life and an identity for who I am since I was a child,” Price said. “When you get to a point in your life where you’re able to give back to something that gave you so much, you give back.”

    Rattling docs

    FAMU students Jazlyn Byrd and Shelecia Reid, have been selected for the American Heart Association (AHA) Scholars Program at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

    For the second year in a row, Quest Diagnostics is supporting FAMU students in the program, said Dr. Charlene Walton, director of the HBCU Scholars Program and Collegiate Diversity Partnerships Health Strategies for the AHA Southeast Region.

    “We are honored and excited to play a role in their development as future biomedical, health science and public health leaders,” Walton said in a statement.

    Jazlyn Byrd and Shelecia Reid share the honors and a mentor, FSU College of Medicine professor Dr. Sylvie Naar. Graphic via FAMU.

    Byrd is a junior biology and pre-med student from Tallahassee. She’s a Dean’s List scholar and a member of Teaching Our Youth Science and the National Council of Negro Women.

    Byrd placed third overall out of 10 undergraduate students and two graduate students with her research, completed at FAMU. She is working hard to pursue her goal of becoming an anesthesiologist and “looks forward to building professional bonds with her fellow scholars.”

    Reid is a junior biology student from Lauderhill who hopes to become a dermatologist. She earned a place on the President’s Honor Roll and Dean’s Honor Roll and is a Florida Medallion Scholar and a Frederick A. DeLuca Foundation Scholarship Recipient.

    Her memberships include the National Society of Black Women in Medicine, Big Sister Little Sister Mentoring Program, Caribbean Student Association and Ardent Volunteer under the guidance of the FAMU Efferson Student Union.

    In 2021, Quest Diagnostics supported FAMU inaugural scholars Sapphire Holston and Kerstyn Russell. Quest’s support will allow this year’s scholars to attend the AHA’s International Scientific Sessions, the largest cardiovascular disease conference in the world, held in Chicago in November, and the annual HBCU Scholars Research Symposium in Durham in April.

    Search history

    You don’t truly know someone until you’ve seen their Google search history. Trust us, you don’t want to know most people.

    But in the aggregate, search engine requests can reveal some interesting trends, such as Floridians’ favorite way to lose money. CasinoGrounds recently pulled the search data for various gambling-related terms and created a list of the most popular online casino games by state.

    It was a safe bet to call poker as the No. 1 casino game in Florida.

    According to the database, Florida is kind of basic — the No. 1 search request was poker, which stretches the definition of “casino game” as it is most often played in man caves with ceiling plaster yellowed by cigar smoke. The most popular tack-on to the search was Texas Hold ‘Em, a variation of the game that hit its pop-culture peak when Nickelback and OutKast were relevant.

    No. 2 was blackjack, a casino staple that also serves as a quick lesson on the futility of most types of insurance. The third-place slot went to bingo, which is the game many non-Floridians closely associate with the Sunshine State and, again, is just as common to find in a VFW hall as it is in a casino. No. 4 was baccarat, James Bond’s preferred game despite EON Productions trying its darndest to convince filmgoers otherwise. The list concludes with keno, a game of ancient Asian origin that proves people were praying to RNGesus before the Nazarene had his first follower.

    “It is fascinating to see how many people search for gambling games online. With an average of 30,000 searches each month for ‘online poker’ in the United States, online poker is the most popular online casino game in America, so it’s fascinating to see the variation in interest in classic games across different states,” a CasinoGames spokesperson said. “The internet has brought together people who love gambling in a huge community online, where people can play a vast array of games without having to physically be at a casino.”

    RIP Antonacci

    Longtime government official Pete Antonacci, who was serving as the head of Florida’s new election police unit, has died after suffering a heart attack.

    DeSantis had named Antonacci, who served multiple Republican administrations — and alongside Democrats — during his lengthy career, to lead the Department of State’s Office of Election Crimes and Security less than four months prior.

    He was in the Capitol when he suffered a heart attack.

    Pete Antonacci was often called a Republican fixer, but he was respected by both sides for his service.

    “730and I are deeply saddened by the passing of Peter Antonacci, Director of the Office of Elections Crimes and Security,” DeSantis said in a statement. “He was a dedicated, tenacious and assiduous public servant, lawyer and respected professional — a friend to all in the State of Florida.”

    At the Department of State, Antonacci worked under Cord Byrd.

    “Pete was a steadfast public servant throughout his career and played an important role at the Florida Department of State having been appointed by Governor Ron DeSantis in July as Director of the Office of Election Crimes and Security,” Byrd said. “My thoughts and prayers and those of the employees who worked closely with Pete are with his family and loved ones.”

    Others in the process also mourned his loss, like his successor as Palm Beach State Attorney, Dave Aronberg. The pair also worked together beginning in 1999 under Democratic Attorney General Bob Butterworth.

    “I never knew he was a Republican working for a Democratic AG, because it didn’t matter,” Aronberg said. “Pete always put public service and the rule of law ahead of partisanship.”

    Crist also had words for Antonacci’s family.

    “Governor Crist extends his deepest condolences to Peter Antonacci’s family, friends, and loved ones,” spokeswoman Samantha Ramirez said. “Peter Antonacci was a dedicated and respected public servant with a long history of working with members from both sides of the aisle to better Florida. May he rest in peace.”

    Campaign Directions

    Ron DeSantis — Crossways — The $12 million question: Are the migrant flights a political win or a loss?

    DeSantis ‘24 — Up arrow — Go ahead and add 99 delegates to the board.

    Perla  Down arrow  Worst. Travel agent. Ever.

    James Montgomerie — Down arrow — Hopefully $1.5M helps the CEO of Vitriol, er, Vertol Systems, sleep at night.

    Jason Pizzo — Up arrow — He has a lot of courtroom experience. And a lot of questions.

    Lauren Poe — Up arrow — Gainesville might need to upgrade its airport, but that’s nothing $12 million wouldn’t solve.

    Andrew Warren — Down arrow — Where’s the Uno reverse card when you need it?

    Jason Brodeur — Crossways arrow — He’s probably going to win another term despite the Orlando Sentinel’s efforts.

    Nikki Fried — Down arrow — Somebody tell her that the 30-day, no-contact rule applies to elections, too.

    Dane Eagle — Up arrow — City & State says he’s more important than Moody and Patronis, so you know it’s true.

    China — Down arrow — Winnie the Pooh is feeling a lot like Eeyore right now.

    Amex, Visa — Down arrow — Is the new purchase category for bonus cash back, or are they just spying on us?

    Facebook, Google, etc. — Crossways arrow — Moody is challenging them to best two out of three.

    Parents with school-aged kids — Up arrow — A year-round sales tax holiday for books, toys and sports gear should help them deal with inflation.

    Freedom Week — Up arrow — What does its name say about the other 51 weeks of the year? Who cares, take the discount.

    Terry Gwinn — Up arrow — Gwinn Brothers Farm is about to become a lot more profitable.

    NIL — Crossways arrow — It’s a more appealing recruit convo than the kinesiology program. Too bad it’s off-limits.

    Jamie Grosshans — Down arrow — She’ll probably be retained. She probably won’t get a fan club.

    Law schools — Down arrow — What would you say … you do here?

    Rocky Hanna — Crossways arrow — We get his point, but it’s the lamest diss track we’ve ever heard.

    FAMU — Down arrow — They could close the gap by slashing the admin budget. Students are handling those functions for them.

    Drew Piers — Up arrow — The youngest partner at Sachs Media is the newest winner of FSU’s Reubin O’D. Askew Young Alumni Award.

    Amazon — Up arrow — Package delayed, but still in transit.


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