UN Ambassador Nikki Haley is among the 50 most important people in the world

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley (Source: CNN)U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley (Source: CNN)

COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) -

Former South Carolina governor and current UN Ambassador Nikki Haley has been named on a list of 50 most important people in the world.

Bloomberg Businessweek, in their inaugural Bloomberg 50, named Haley at the very top. 

Haley is one of the highest profile and most well-known members of the Donald Trump administration after she resigned from the governor’s chair in 2016 to become his Ambassador to the United Nations. 

The magazine said Haley is speaking for Trump more than any of his other appointees. 

“On Sept. 11, Haley pushed through a Security Council agreement to impose the toughest-ever sanctions on North Korea, limiting the country’s oil imports and banning its textile exports, which will deprive Pyongyang of what Haley estimated is 90 percent of its export revenue,” the magazine wrote.

Copyright 2017 WIS. All rights reserved. 

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    Ernest Finney, the state’s first African-American chief justice, has passed

    Former SC Chief Justice Ernest Finney, Jr. (provided)Former SC Chief Justice Ernest Finney, Jr. (provided)

    COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) -

    Former South Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice Ernest Finney has passed away at 86, several sources close to the family confirm.

    Finney was a giant in the South Carolina legal community, becoming the first African-American to serve as the chief justice on the state’s high court since reconstruction.

    Finney was also a former legislator elected in 1972. 

    Finney’s daughter, Nikki Finney, is an award-winning poet.

    Copyright 2017 WIS. All rights reserved.

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    Spike Lee: still the boldest and brashest auteur in American film | Observer profile

    Thirty one years after the original film was released, Spike Lee’s She’s Gotta Have It has gained a new life as a 10-part series on Netflix. The film and the series form a convenient bridge from which to view not just the director’s career, but also the changing nature of sexual politics and black representation in American cinema.

    For those who have not seen either version, the story concerns a young African American artist called Nola Darling who lives in Brooklyn and much of whose leisure time is spent juggling three male lovers.

    In 1986, it was something of a radical scenario. In the first place, arty black independent films were a rarity and ones focused on a liberated woman and her busy sex life were, until Lee’s debut, nonexistent.

    Shot in moody black and white, She’s Gotta Have It was made for just $175,000 in two weeks and went on to earn 40 times that amount at the box office. Although the film showed distinct traces of its director’s inexperience, it was also stylish, funny, cool and confident.

    It was obvious that a genuine talent had arrived and equally apparent that the person who was most convinced of that opinion was Lee himself. From the outset, he was not prepared to be underestimated or overlooked, a fate, he felt with no little justification, which had been standard for many black film-makers. “Being black,” he said, “means you have to be 10 times better than everybody else.”

    Before Lee, there was blaxploitation, a subgenre that acted as a kind of film backwater for black film-makers who were not going to get mainstream films to direct. It would not be an exaggeration to say that Lee almost singlehandedly changed the image of African Americans behind the camera in Hollywood.

    Another of his achievements with She’s Gotta Have It was putting Brooklyn on the hip map, long before Girls, Master of None, hipsters, gentrification and perfect espressos made it the place to move to in New York. Having grown up in the borough, Lee has remained loyal to the cause of what he often refers to as the “Republic of Brooklyn”, although he now lives on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, where his children attended an elite private school.

    But undoubtedly the film’s boldest statement was to present an independent black woman who, far from clinging hold of her man – an all too familiar cinematic cliche – was uncommitted to three different men. It was, in many respects, a neat reversal of the black-dude-playing-the field stereotype. More than that, perhaps, it depicted African Americans doing things such as kissing and making love, which astonishingly was – and to some extent still is – a less than common cinematic sight.

    However, at the film’s centre was a scene in which Nola (played by Tracy Camilla Johns) tries to reignite her affair with Jamie, seemingly the most sensitive and mature of her lovers. But when her seduction backfires, he rapes her, after which Nola decides to start a monogamous relationship with her rapist.

    Even at the time, it was a disturbing scene, though one sidestepped by many critics. Viewed from today’s perspective, it looks shockingly wrong.

    Lee has always been tremendously defensive of his work, tending to lash out at critics who draw attention to perceived shortcomings. But three years ago, in a conversation with a journalist at the Cannes film festival, Lee said the scene was his biggest regret in his career.

    “If I was able to have any do-overs,” he said, “that would be it. It was just totally… stupid. I was immature. It made light of rape and that’s the one thing I would take back… I can promise you, there will be nothing like that in She’s Gotta Have It, the TV show, that’s for sure.”

    And he’s as good as his word. Whereas Lee wrote and directed the original film, the TV series features four women screenwriters, including the Pulitzer prize-winning playwright Lynn Nottage and Lee’s sister, the actress Joie Lee.

    In the TV version, Nola is physically assaulted and catcalled, an event that is treated as a trauma she works through in her art and in therapy. Both takes are self-conscious, partly as a result of the characters occasionally speaking direct to screen, but the TV series seems almost painfully concerned to get its sexual and identity politics absolutely correct.

    At times, it can make for slightly strained viewing, as if its creators had spent too long in a workshop on sex and intersectionality. And while it attempts to do justice to millennial preoccupations and – there is no other phrase – self-obsession, it steers an uncomfortable path between depicting Nola’s scrutiny by the “male gaze” and the camera’s own fixation with her naked body.

    When it comes to identity, Lee has never been in doubt of defining himself as an uncompromising black man from Brooklyn. It has shaped and defined his work as well as his bristling image. When he started out, there was very little promotion money for She’s Gotta Have It, so he made sure that he got attention by promoting himself in a provocative fashion.

    Bringing attention to racism and prejudice can often be seen as a provocative act – if done by a black man. But Lee, who’s been described as a “slight man with thin skin”, was at the beginning a very effective showman. As if to underline the point, he acted in the first 10 films he directed, playing the ridiculous but amusing Mars Blackmon in She’s Gotta Have It.

    Although Lee was born in Atlanta, Georgia, he moved as a child to Brooklyn, where his mother taught art and literature and his father was a jazz musician and composer.

    It was a middle-class upbringing and he attended Atlanta’s Morehouse College, the celebrated black university whose alumni include Martin Luther King and Samuel L Jackson.

    After doing a masters in film back in New York, he made a 60-minute film Joe’s Bed-Stuy Barbershop: We Cut Heads as his degree thesis. After She’s Gotta Have It and School Daze, Lee wrote, produced and directed the film that made his reputation and perhaps still dominates his CV: Do the Right Thing.

    At the time, it was seen as an incendiary piece of film-making, with several critics suggesting that it would provoke riots (the film, set again in Brooklyn, features a riot). “Don’t these folks realise that my whole point was to provoke discussion so that the incident that happens in the film won’t happen in real life?” Lee quite reasonably protested.

    The film was also criticised for its failure to portray the drug problems then afflicting inner-city America. Nonetheless, it was startlingly ambitious, full of energy and shone a light on the simmering racial tensions that had been too often neglected in the cinema.

    For many observers, it also marked Lee’s directorial high point. There have been others, most notably Malcolm X in 1992. In the first episode of She’s Gotta Have It, Lee has his characters complain that Denzel Washington, who played the lead, was robbed for not winning the Oscar for best actor.

    Having never been nominated for a directorial Academy award, Lee has frequently criticised the Academy’s racism. He’s also expended quite a bit of creative energy in spats with Quentin Tarantino (whom he lambasts for his use of the N-word), Clint Eastwood and many others. His tendency to react first and think later has not been softened by the advent of social media.

    In 2012, he used Twitter to circulate the address of George Zimmerman, the man who shot unarmed high-school student Trayvon Martin in a gated community in Florida. Aside from potentially inciting a lynch mob, Lee had got the wrong address and had to pay compensation to the entirely innocent occupants who were forced to leave their home.

    It’s this kind of activism that has led some critics to suggest that Lee’s public persona has come to undermine his cinematic reputation. And although he has been a prolific film-maker, directing more than 35 films and documentaries, and 15 TV shows, as well as producing, screenwriting and acting, while also teaching a film course, it is perhaps fair to say that he hasn’t quite lived up to his extraordinary early promise.

    She’s Gotta Have It will probably not change that judgment, but it will add to an enormously rich and impressively varied body of work.

    THE LEE FILE

    Born Shelton Jackson “Spike” Lee, 20 March 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia, the eldest of four children of an arts teacher and a jazz musician. He moved to Brooklyn as a child.

    Best of times He was nominated for best original screenplay for 1989’s Do the Right Thing, a film that was critically acclaimed and aired a vital debate about race in America.

    Worst of times Lee was offended that Do the Right Thing was not nominated for the best film Oscar, particularly as the award went to Driving Miss Daisy, a film about a black chauffeur and his wealthy white female boss. “That hurt,” said Lee.

    What he says “Black people have to be in control of their own image because film is a powerful medium. We can’t just sit back and let other people define our existence.”

    What others say “The great thing about Lee is that he has not tired or faltered.” David Thomson, editor of The New Biographical Dictionary of Film.

    RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

    Ministers Look to Revive Martin Luther King’s 1968 Poverty Campaign

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    When 12 religious leaders in collars and vestments were arrested last week in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington, they were reading Bible verses about caring for the poor, and doing it so loudly that their voices could be heard at the doors of senators’ office suites nine stories above.

    It was to little avail: The Senate went ahead and passed a tax bill early on Saturday, promoted as relief for the middle class, that mainly benefits corporations and the rich — and that many economists say offers little or nothing for the poor.

    The middle class and its discontents have occupied so much political and media attention lately that poverty has been crowded out. But some prominent religious leaders are gearing up for a campaign to try to put it back on the nation’s agenda in a way that it hasn’t been in decades.

    On Monday, exactly 50 years after the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. began his Poor People’s Campaign, the Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II, a black minister and civil rights leader from North Carolina, and the Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, a white theologian originally from Milwaukee, will announce a revival of Dr. King’s campaign, which stalled when he was assassinated in 1968. Organizers now hope to mount large protests on 40 consecutive days next year, in at least 25 state capitals and other locations, with crowds in the tens of thousands courting arrest.

    “Nothing is going to change until we put a face on it, until we drive the public discourse, until we restart the moral narrative,” Dr. Barber said in an interview.

    Dr. Barber has had some recent success using a sustained campaign of nonviolent civil disobedience at the state level. The Moral Mondays movement in North Carolina that began in 2013 challenged limitations on voting rights and helped to unseat a governor. The new campaign will test whether organizers can take that model nationwide, and whether a multi-faith, multiracial movement can break through the nation’s polarized politics.

    The two ministers have spent the last year visiting churches and union halls to mobilize thousands of activists, including homeless people, veterans, clergy members and students.

    They are aiming to redefine what constitutes a “moral agenda” in politics. Many on the right frame it in narrow terms of opposition to abortion and same-sex marriage. By contrast, the poor people’s campaign’s sprawling agenda includes issues like wages, health care, immigrant rights, gay and transgender rights, criminal justice reform, and clean water and air.

    Valerie Jean Blakely, a mother of five in Detroit, became a local organizer after protesting shut-offs of water service in her neighborhood in 2014. Her husband lost a factory job after the 2008 crash, she said, and now the couple make less than $20,000 a year, she said.

    “This is what we’ve been waiting for, this kind of mass mobilization,” Ms. Blakely said in a telephone interview. “I don’t have any faith in Democrats or Republicans.”

    The campaign, which falls in an especially charged midterm election year, includes plans to converge in a march in Washington in June. Drs. Barber and Theoharis say that the campaign is not a partisan undertaking, and that they will not allow candidates for office to piggyback on its events.

    But in a broader sense, “politics is everything,” Dr. Theoharis said. “We’re making it impossible in the next election cycle for them to get away without talking about poverty.”

    The two ministers have not stayed entirely aloof from electoral politics. They joined last month with clergy members in Alabama to denounce Roy S. Moore, the Republican Senate candidate there, and what Dr. Barber called “the unbearable hypocrisy of Roy Moore’s Christian rhetoric.”

    Organizers of the poor people’s campaign say they have already received support from several religious denominations, including the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.); the United Church of Christ; the Union for Reform Judaism; and Dr. Barber’s denomination, the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Dr. Theoharis, a Presbyterian minister, is co-director of the Kairos Center for Religions, Rights and Social Justice, based at Union Theological Seminary in New York City.

    It remains to be seen whether the campaign can catch fire as the organizers hope. Dr. Barbara Williams-Skinner, a minister, longtime civil rights advocate and co-leader of the National African American Clergy Network, says most churches have remained on the sidelines in the Trump era, and too few have spoken out against the tax bills in Congress, which are expected to lead to significant cuts in the nation’s social safety net.

    Although more than 2,400 leaders of many faiths signed a letter to senators calling the tax bills “fundamentally unjust,” and the nation’s Catholic bishops requested multiple changes to benefit the working poor, their objections have barely registered.

    “You don’t see the outrage of the civil rights movement, or the antiwar movement,” Dr. Williams-Skinner said. “You don’t see that kind of outrageous indignation.”

    “We’re at a very sad state in this country, of almost a shameless disregard for the poor,” she continued. “We’re taking money away from struggling people shamelessly.”

    Dr. Williams-Skinner was one of the religious leaders protesting in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building last week, as part of the evangelical social justice group Sojourners. She read from the Gospel of Matthew: “I was hungry, but you did not give me anything to eat.”

    After Capitol Police officers warned the protesters three times by bullhorn to stop, Dr. Williams-Skinner, who is 73, and the others were taken away in plastic handcuffs. She was booked on a charge of disturbing the peace — the first time, she said, that she had ever been arrested at a protest.

    “I decided it’s time to put up or shut up,” she said afterward. “There are not enough people of faith angry about this as a violation of the word of God.”

    Correction: 

    An earlier version of this article misstated part of the name of one of the religious denominations supporting the campaign for the poor. It is the Union for Reform Judaism, not the Union of Reform Judaism.

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    POINT/COUNTERPOINT: Should government require a bakery to design cakes for gay weddings?

    Deb Walker

    It’s not about cake. It’s also not about religious freedom. At its core, the Masterpiece Cakeshop vs. Colorado Civil Rights Commission case that will be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court is about whether businesses should be able to discriminate against people because of who they are and whether all people will be treated equally, as is promised by the Constitution.

    The outcome of this case will be critical to civil rights for all and could undermine protected status under the law for people across the nation who may be subjected to discrimination based on their race, sex, marital status or religion.

    In 2012, newlyweds Charlie Craig and David Mullins were refused service at Masterpiece Cakeshop in Lakewood based solely on their sexual orientation. The Colorado Civil Rights Commission, affirmed by the courts, found that the bakery violated Colorado nondiscrimination law by refusing to sell a wedding cake to the couple. The bakery argues that because of its religious opposition (combined with what it claims is artistic expression in designing cakes), it should be exempted from following Colorado law.

    The U.S. Supreme Court has heard this argument before. After the Civil Rights Act passed in 1964, a restaurant called Piggie Park denied service to black people citing religious opposition. In a decisive vote, it was established that civil rights supersede religious freedom. Businesses that are open to the public to provide commercial services (like selling cake) cannot discriminate based on who the customer is and have an obligation to serve all people on the same terms.

    Simply, the laws that ensure that all people are treated fairly require serving all customers. Those who favor the right to discriminate based on religion would like us to believe that this is an issue of religious conscience. Providing a good or service to a person does not imply approval of his religion, sexual orientation, gender, race or marital status, and validating this assertion could have catastrophic consequences for civil rights. We have seen examples of similar cases of discrimination based on the same argument: a physician who refuses to treat a patient because of HIV status, a funeral home refusing services because the deceased was gay, a pharmacy that refuses to sell birth control to an unmarried woman, or a landlord who will not rent to a person because of his religion. We depend on nondiscrimination laws to ensure that all people are treated fairly, and the Masterpiece case seeks to undermine these protections.

    Central to who we are as Americans is our deep commitment to protecting the religious freedom that is guaranteed to us by the First Amendment. As a committed Christian, my ability to believe, worship and express my faith is protected by the Constitution. What is not protected is the ability to discriminate against others in business.

    Our history is one in which we have progressively achieved greater inclusion and equality for all. We treat people equally irrespective of their sexual orientation, gender, disability, race or religion, and we protect them from discrimination. We must not undo protections that we have in place, and we must continue to require that businesses open to all serve everyone on the same terms.

     

    Mike Jones

    Government out of our bedrooms! Government out of our lives! That was the battle cry of the 1970s and 80s when I was a radical gay rights advocate.

    My name is Mike Jones. You may recall my involvement with the Ted Haggard/New Life Church story in 2006. I know all about gay oppression and discrimination. As Karl Rove pointed out, my story was one of the influences in the 2006 national elections. What I learned and experienced then brings me to where I am today in supporting Jack Phillips of Masterpiece Cakeshop.

    Putting yourself out there for the world to see, judge, and ridicule makes you incredibly vulnerable. The hateful things that are said are exhausting. Jack and I know how hurtful words can be when the people saying them do not even know you.

    When I first heard of Jack’s story, I wanted to know more. Who is the homophobic and hateful man who would not decorate a gay wedding cake?

    On my first visit to Masterpiece, I stood there looking over the goods as a soft-spoken man was attending to another couple. He then came over to me and I asked him if his name was Jack. He affirmed and I extended my hand out and stated I was a gay man. He shook my hand and said, “Welcome,” and “How may I help you?”

    From there, I continued to visit Masterpiece, and each time my conversations were a bit longer and more detailed. His daughter greets me with open arms when I visit. One time Jack wanted a picture of the two of us and he had his daughter take the picture. As we posed, Jack placed his arm around me. I thought to myself, “is this a man who hates gays?”

    The government has a responsibility to protect all citizens from unjust discrimination. However, we must look at issues in context. Does this story deal with employment, housing, health care, or any other of life’s essential needs? Jack did not say, “Sit at the back of the bus.” He said he would not decorate a cake the way a couple wanted. Aside from the religious freedom argument, how would anyone feel if the government forced you to do something with your skills?

    We must be careful of this slippery slope. Should a Muslim or Jewish bakery have to produce something that is against his or her beliefs? Should an all-women’s art gallery be forced to display a man’s artwork? Should an African-American gallery be forced to accept Caucasians’ work?

    Where does it stop?

    Tolerance and understanding go both ways, and faith is a part of our fabric. If both sides do not infringe on each other’s everyday existence and needs, then we can respect all beliefs.

    I have lost some liberal friends because of my support for Jack, but I am proud to call Jack my friend.

    Deb Walker is the executive director of Citizens Project. She lives in Colorado Springs. Mike Jones works in health care with a focus on dementia and Alzheimer’s care. He lives in Lakewood.

    Fake Roy Moore story just the latest example of attempts to sully media’s credibility

    When the Washington Post reported on Monday that it had been the target of a woman who tried to get the newspaper to publish a fake news story about Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, the revelation came as a surprise to even some of its own reporters.

    They realized Jaime Phillips, whose picture accompanied the story, had in fact been trying to ingratiate herself with a number of Post reporters over several months.

    “This woman, Jaime Phillips, was joining journalism groups and showing up at social events, including some send-offs for Post employees,” said Callum Borchers, who writes for the Post and spoke this week about the troubling story with the CBC’s The Investigators.

    • Watch the full interview with Callum Borchers on The Investigators, Saturday at 9:30 p.m. ET and Sunday at 5:30 p.m. ET on CBC News Network.

    Borchers says it was only when the paper published the details of what it had uncovered about Phillips and her apparent employer, Project Veritas, that the Post realized the scheme to undermine the newspaper’s credibility had been quietly underway for months, as Phillips methodically worked to strike up private friendships with various reporters.

    Post Conservative Group

    James O’Keefe, president of Project Veritas, the conservative group that sent one of its employees to peddle a false story about Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore to the Washington Post. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/The Associated Press)

    “The goal, of course, was to ultimately get records, either on tape or perhaps in written form, of journalists saying incriminating things that would reflect bias in the newsroom,” Borchers said.

    Project Veritas is an organization headed by conservative activist James O’Keefe that attempts to expose liberal bias by staging undercover stings on certain groups and media organizations that it perceives as leftist or corrupt.

    MSNBC also a target of fake news

    As the Post reported, Phillips had recently told one of those reporters an explosive story about Moore, a Republican who is already facing serious allegations about relationships he allegedly had with teenage girls when he was in his 30s.

    Phillips claimed that Moore had impregnated her when she was 15 and driven her across state lines to get an abortion.

    [embedded content]

    But a Post researcher discovered an online posting that suggested Phillips worked for an organization whose stated goal is to discredit the mainstream media, often by trying to trick journalists with false information. The Post reporters who’d been working on the story also realized she had been prompting them to speculate on how damaging the story might be for Moore, in an attempt to get the reporters to discredit the Post’s reporting.

    While the newspaper caught the ruse before it fell victim to it, it’s not the only recent example of attempts to try to damage a news organization’s credibility.

    Borchers recounted the experience of MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow, who revealed that earlier this year she had been sent what appeared to be a confidential national security document that purported to tie the Donald Trump campaign to Russia.

    Callum Borchers

    Washington Post writer Callum Borchers said the woman who carried out the failed sting spent months trying to befriend journalists. with the intention of getting them on tape saying or doing something that reflected liberal bias. (CBC)

    “The idea is that she would be duped into airing a report on this document, and then it would be exposed as a fake later, and it would be this huge embarrassment that would discredit reporting on that same subject,” said Borchers.

    Again, MSNBC caught the fake and instead reported on the effort to dupe the news organization.

    Small newsrooms potentially more vulnerable

    But NBC and the Washington Post are among the largest, best-resourced news organizations in the U.S., in sharp contrast to the many hundreds of smaller newsrooms in that country and Canada. The bylines of four reporters appear on the Washington Post story about the attempt to fool them. 

    That’s more reporters than work in some small-town newsrooms.

    Borchers agrees lack of reporting staff could make small newsrooms more susceptible to publishing or broadcasting stories before realizing the stories are fake, but says the real “payoff” for those trying to plant fake news is in fooling the biggest names in the news media.

    Journalists covering journalists’ misdeeds; Plan to infiltrate Washington Post backfires; Fake health news (The Investigators with Diana Swain)22:21

    “If Project Veritas wants to discredit the mainstream media writ large, you have to go after a big target like us, or the New York Times, or NBC News, or something like that,” Borchers said.

    “That said, though, it doesn’t mean there couldn’t be efforts to dupe smaller news organizations into publishing false material and perhaps chip away at the media’s [collective] credibility.”

    Also this week on The Investigators with Diana Swain: In the wake of recent high-profile dismissals of broadcasters accused of sexual impropriety, the fifth estate‘s Gillian Findlay talks about the challenges of journalists investigating other journalists. And CBC Radio’s Dr. Brian Goldman, host of White Coat, Black Art talks about the undiagnosed problem of fake health news.

    RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

    Extra Virgin Olive Oil Makes a Great Gift for the Holiday Season

    Three superb extra virgin olive oils from Italy, Spain and California now available at the Gourmet Living Amazon Storefront

    Step out of your comfort zone this Christmas and give the healthy gift of extra virgin olive oil. Furthermore, these three great EVOOs will make your foods and salads taste great.”

    — Sheila May

    GREENWICH, CT, UNITED STATES, December 2, 2017 /EINPresswire.com/ — What better way to celebrate the new year than with a holiday gift basket of exceptional extra virgin olive oils from Gourmet Living?

    Consider the company’s special olive oil gift pack which consists of three 500 ml bottles of EVOO from Tuscany, Italy; Penedes, Spain and California. Interested buyers can purchase these exceptional EVOOs at the Gourmet Living storefront on Amazon.com.

    Its three-bottle olive oil gift sampler is priced at $66.50, yet each product is individually packaged. Amazon Prime members receive free shipping. Alternatively, mix and match these oils with balsamic vinegars or the company’s authentic olive wood serving dishes.

    These healthy first-pressed olive oils were chosen by the owners of Gourmet Living for their taste, authenticity and value to consumers.

    Toscano is the classic Italian olive oil blend and of the three main olive varieties from Tuscany: Frantoio (50%), Moraiolo (30%) and Leccino (approximately 20%). This flavorful extra virgin olive oil (“EVOO”) was harvested in late 2016 and will easily last through March, 2019 if unopened.

    The Spanish EVOO was harvested in 2016 and consists of oil pressed from the Arbequina olive. This olive oil has a slightly more pronounced “peppery” aftertaste that Europeans prefer.

    Gourmet Living’s California extra virgin olive oil was harvested in 2016 from the Picual olive. It has a relatively softer taste profile than oils from Europe and is great in salads and for dipping bread.

    Says co-owner Sheila May, “this is a great way to compare authentic extra virgin olive oils from Europe and a bouncy yet superb Californian EVOO harvested from the Picual olive. Americans can now sample the taste of premium olive oils that project their freshness and vitality.”

    The 3 varieties of olives used in Toscano are harvested in the morning and crushed in the afternoon to extract the highest quality of oil and the maximum level of freshness and antioxidant compounds. Olives are typically harvested in Tuscany between the 15th of October and the 20th of November. Green or half-colored olives tend to have the best combination of aroma and color.

    While ripe olive tend to produce a higher yield of oil, its aroma and quality tends to suffer when compared to “younger” olives that have not matured on the tree. In general, 100 kilos of olives, produces 12 kilos of olive oil.

    Extra virgin olive oil is the cornerstone of the Mediterranean diet and many Americans have switched to olive oil because of its special nutritional benefits. The quality of EVOO produced in California has shown marked improvement in recent years as health-conscious Americans often substitute olive oil for butter in their daily cooking.

    The health benefits of using extra virgin olive oil remains a controversial subject. Some suggest that olive oil helps to reduce heart disease and may even control diabetes. Sceptics argue that the“health benefits” of olive oil are not supported by independent studies. Nevertheless, both sides agree that incorporating more fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet (commonly consumed with EVOO) is healthier than consuming processed foods.

    Sold in distinctive 500ml bottles, these olive oils will last at least a year after they have been opened for the first time.

    Whether one is purchasing this olive oil gift set for themselves or others, it provides an excellent opportunity to sample authentic olive oils from Italy, Spain and California.

    Mix or match these great olive oils and delight fellow gourmands with a gift that is sure to please every palate.

    Sheila May
    Gourmet Living
    +1 203-629-1530
    email us here

    Health Benefits of Olive Oil

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    RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

    “Let There Be Reggae” highlights reggae and dancehall at Art Basel

    Art Basel Miami Beach 2017 will be held throughout South Florida from December 7 -10th.

    The count-down has begun to Art Basel Miami Beach 2017 weekend and this year art fans can get ready to soak up the vibes of reggae and dance hall in pictures.

    ‘Let There Be Reggae,’ is a unique showcase, curated snapshot of reggae music and dancehall culture that will feature works of Australian artist/illustrator Robin Clare; Jamaican photographer Roy Sweetland; Jamaican-born photographer and current Fort Lauderdale resident, David Muir; ultimate Jamaican Dancehall street sign collector Maxine Walters and founder of Irish and Chin “sound clash promotions,” Garfield “Chin” Bourne.

    The three-day exhibition will begin with an opening reception on Thursday, December 7th, from 6–10 p.m., in the Wynwood section of Miami.

    ‘Let There Be Reggae’ will give art and music lovers a flavor of the Caribbean musical scene while illustrating the odyssey of reggae music and current day dancehall.

    For more information on the event, visit lettherebereggae.com. Art Basel will also feature numerous black artists via ‘Black and Basel.’

    RankTribe™ Black Business Directory News – Arts & Entertainment

    Extraordinary 1890 Baseball Signed Docs for 1st Player Revolt Discovered and to be Auctioned by Memory Lane Inc.

    Remarkable Tim Keefe & Buck Ewing SIGNED ET AL Note Requesting a Special Stockholder Meeting + Acknowledgement + Response

    Leading sports collectibles dealer to auction rare, signed baseball documents that represent the very first player revolt for players’ rights and free agency

    TUSTIN, CALIFORNIA, UNITED STATES, December 1, 2017 /EINPresswire.com/ — Memory Lane Inc., the leading dealer of sports collectibles, today announced the discovery and upcoming auction of historical 1890 baseball Players’ League signed documents that represent the inaugural players revolt against team management for players’ rights formed on Dec. 17, 1889. Including extremely rare signatures of Tim Keefe, Buck Ewing and John Montgomery Ward that have been authenticated by Professional Sports Authenticator (PSA), the world’s largest third-party sports card authentication service, these documents are regarded as one of the most miraculous sports memorabilia discoveries experienced by the notable pastime and will be available for auction in separate lots starting Friday, Dec. 22, 2017 and will close Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018.

    To view the Memory Lane auction starting Friday, Dec. 22, 2017, visit: www.memorylaneinc.com/site/lots/gallery

    Proudly dubbed “The Northeast Find,” a significant number of unique documents relating to the by-gone 1890 Players’ League were rescued decades ago from a desolate New York-based building storage room and were recently brought to Memory Lane’s attention earlier this year by the team’s esteemed consignor. The 1890 Players’ League represented a significant moment in baseball history, preceding the Federal League and professional baseball players eventual challenge to the “reserve clause” that ultimately led to “free agency” and expulsion of the owners’ once tightly secured grip on players’ rights.

    “Unquestionably, no memorabilia offering conjures up the excitement and fascination of newly unearthed artifacts,” said JP Cohen, President of Memory Lane Inc. “Considering its one-of-a-kind stature, we are sure the vast array of documents presented as separate lots in this auction, will capture the hearts of a myriad of elite hobbyists.”

    Auction Highlights:
    Extremely rare signatures from noteworthy individuals in the design of the Player’s League and Hall of Fame icons Tim Keefe, Buck Ewing and John Montgomery Ward
    An extraordinary, single-page document signed by both Tim Keefe and Buck Ewing
    Unique Player’s League Articles of Agreement, Constitution and By-laws
    Signed agreements for several Players’ League teams detailing salary-related bonds
    Signed documents detailing the sale of the Cincinnati National League franchise to the Player’s League
    And so much more on memorylaneinc.com

    “Collecting 19th century baseball autographs is one of the toughest endeavors in the entire hobby. Not only was the practice of acquiring them uncommon, but many of the autographs signed during the period were discarded over time,” said Joe Orlando, CEO of Collectors Universe and President of PSA and PSA/DNA Authentication Services. “Opportunities to add the autograph of players like Buck Ewing, Tim Keefe and John Montgomery Ward do not come around often, but the combination of their scarcity coupled with the importance of these documents makes this opportunity even more enticing for the advanced hobbyist. Content can play a significant role in the appeal of an autograph, especially when it is related to the sport that made each signer famous. The fact that these elusive signatures are connected to such historical documents takes the intrigue to a whole new level.” 

    After first seeing the signed documents of Keefe, Ward and Ewing, PSA/DNA Authentication Services’ head autograph authenticator Kevin Keating perfectly summed up their incredible existence by stating, “Simply mind blowing!”

    Dates & Availability
    Collectors will have a once-in-a-lifetime chance to secure these highly-historical relics in a multiple auction lot sale starting Friday, Dec. 22, 2017 and ending Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018.

    To visit the auction starting Friday, Dec. 22, 2017, visit: www.memorylaneinc.com/site/lots/gallery

    About Memory Lane Inc.
    Founded in 2000, Memory Lane Inc. is the leading dealer of sports collectibles with over 120 combined years of sports collecting experience and knowledge. Memory Lane has sold more than $100 million in collectibles since its inception and is an authorized dealer of Professional Sports Authenticator (PSA) and Sportscard Guaranty (SGC). For more information about Memory Lane, visit www.memorylaneinc.com or follow on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook.

    Media Contact:
    Kaycie East
    Memory Lane Inc.
    kaycie.east@gmail.com

    Kaycie East
    Memory Lane Inc.
    8776065263
    email us here

    Dr. Linda Rozell-Shannon of the Vascular Birthmarks Foundation to be Featured on CUTV News Radio

    I hope and pray that I live to see the day that the foundation is no longer needed, because that would mean we have fulfilled our mission to get babies accurately diagnosed and treated early.”

    — Dr. Linda Rozell-Shannon

    LATHAM, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES, December 1, 2017 /EINPresswire.com/ — Vascular birthmarks, most commonly known as hemangiomas, are the most common birth defect of the skin in infants. People know them by their generic terms: strawberry, port wine stain, angel kiss, stork bite. Ninety percent of vascular birthmarks are benign and insignificant, however there are 40,000 babies born each year with vascular birthmarks that can become disfiguring, obstructive and life-threatening.

    Dr. Linda Rozell-Shannon is the President and Founder of the Vascular Birthmarks Foundation. She is the world’s leading lay expert in the field of vascular birthmarks.

    “In medicine, if 90 percent of the time an illness resolves itself, the protocol is to ignore it. It’s called the benign neglect philosophy,” says Dr. Linda. “But that ten percent, which does not resolve on its own is of critical importance to the parents of infants born with these lesions. The benign neglect philosophy should not apply to pediatricians and neonatologists, who are the first physicians to see these babies.”

    Dr. Linda knows firsthand. Her daughter was born with a hemangioma on her lower lip the size of a golf ball. It interfered with her speech and her feeding, but the doctors insisted it would go away and needed no treatment.

    “I couldn’t believe that they could do a heart transplant, yet they didn’t know how to take care of a benign tumor on a baby,” recalls Dr. Linda.

    That’s when a chance encounter led her to Dr. Milton Waner of Arkansas Children’s Hospital.

    “He said, ‘I can have your daughter looking normal in a two-hour outpatient procedure,’” she recalls. “We flew down and he removed her hemangioma. In the recovery room, I looked at him and I said, “Dr. Waner, you’re the one that’s going to write the book with me. I’m starting a foundation and I’d like you to be the medical director.”

    That was 23 years ago. Today, Dr. Waner is an internationally recognized authority on the diagnosis and treatment of hemangiomas and vascular malformations. Their book, Birthmarks: A Guide to Hemangiomas & Vascular Malformations was published in 1997.

    Since its inception, VBF has successfully networked thousands of children and adults into treatment, sponsored significant research, educated physicians and affected family members about the diagnosis and treatment of vascular birthmarks. In December of last year, VBF celebrated its 100,000th patient successfully networked into treatment.

    “Doctors weren’t educating each other concerning this subject,” says Dr. Linda. “I knew right from the beginning that VBF would become the educational foundation. Pediatricians and parents both need to be educated about treatment options.”

    For parents, VBF is the first point of contact. VBF’s website lists 40 physicians who are experts on hemangiomas and vascular malformations and they are available to answer questions from all over the world. VBF’s website receives three million visits each month.

    “All we are trying to do is raise awareness that all vascular birthmarks should not be ignored. The problem is that most pediatricians don’t see enough hemangiomas to become experts. That’s why I have been working with the AAP to educate primary care doctors to refer these infants and that’s why we just launched the first ever on-line course in vascular anomalies” says Dr. Linda. “I hope and pray that I live to see the day that the foundation is no longer needed, because that would mean we have fulfilled our mission to get babies accurately diagnosed and treated early.”

    CUTV News Radio will feature Dr. Linda Rozell-Shannon in an interview with Doug Llewelyn on December 5th at 3pm EST.

    Listen to the show on BlogTalkRadio.

    If you have a question for our guest, call (347) 996-3389.

    For more information, visit http://www.birthmark.org.

    Lou Ceparano
    CUTV News
    (631) 850-3314
    email us here